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Discussion Starter #1
Just recently I went to the dealer and got the snow tires taken off the family hauler. Was talking to their service adviser and the topic of new cars using 0W-20 motor oil came up. He said, it's so thin, it's like water. I thought to myself, interesting, what's the viscosity of water?

So just for giggles I looked it up when I got home. This is what I dug up...

At 68.4 degrees Fahrenheit, WATER has a kinematic viscosity of 1.0 Centistokes (cSt).

At 68.4 degrees Fahrenheit, 0W-20 MOTOR OIL has a kinematic viscosity of 105.68 Centistokes (cSt).

By comparison, at 68.4 degrees Fahrenheit, 10W-30 MOTOR OIL has a kinematic viscosity of 160.11 Centistokes (cSt).

Looks like 0W-20 has long way to go to before "it's like water".

Thought I'd share since I've heard the "water" distinction repeated many times over whether or not it's a literal or arbitrary school of thought.
 

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You can take it literally or comparatively. I would hope most of us would do the later.
 

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And at 100 degrees Fahrenheit, Blackstrap Molasses weighs in at a minimum of 2630 cSt. "Thick as molasses" as a comparative analogy is very relative.:cool: So, as a relative comparison, 0W-20 may "seem like water" to those used to dealing with the somewhat more viscous standard weights of oil.

Having been in the printing industry for 30 years, it was always something to deal with the viscosity of printing inks. We would have some inks that had a very low viscosity coming out of the can ("like water" was a common euphemism to describe them) that developed completely contrary characteristics once you had them in the inking rollers and broken into a film (add the heat and friction coefficient). Other inks that were like road tar in the can would break down and be really "soft" on press. We learned never to judge the characteristics of inks just by their "ink-can" attributes. :)
 

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Compare 10W-30 motor oil and 75W-90 gear lube. The viscosities are surprisingly similar, different grading system used.
 

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Just to add a little fat to the fire, I use Mobil One 0W40 in my 2003, and I don't even know what the viscosity is!

I also use it in my BMW, Mercedes, and my Ford.
 

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Just to add a little fat to the fire, I use Mobil One 0W40 in my 2003, and I don't even know what the viscosity is!

I also use it in my BMW, Mercedes, and my Ford.
The same oil I used in all three of our 3.8 liter vans, our Audi A4 2.8 Quattro, and both of my (former) BMWs. This is really-really good oil. :)
 

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Just to add a little fat to the fire, I use Mobil One 0W40 in my 2003, and I don't even know what the viscosity is!

I also use it in my BMW, Mercedes, and my Ford.
The sooner 3.8L Owners get away from the 20 grade, the better (IMHO), and likely less oil consumption as well. 0W-30, 0W-40, 5W-30 and 10W-30 sound good to me. The 0W-30 and 0W-40 would be "no wax" synthetic oils, ie from Group lV base stocks.

My 2007 GC had 5W-30 in it for the past winter. Looks like I will be changing it soon with just over 7,000 kms on it. Very close to the add mark now, so that works for me. A litre was added at 3800 kms. Not bad for a 3.8L I'm thinking. Let's see how it does on the Valvoline Premium Conventional 10W-30 I recently purchased for $2.72 a litre (Walmart roll back price on 4L jugs at $10.88).
 
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Speaking of adding Fuel to the Fire:


We must remember that Viscosity and Pour-ability do not necessarily affect Protection.


< ducks >
 

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Discussion Starter #12
A little comparison...

This is how I’m breaking down things...

We know that for a time Chrysler engineers specified 5W-30 as the preferred choice for 3.3L and 3.8L engines.

We also know that in order for a motor oil that starts with any (W) rating and ends with a 30, (for example 0W-30, 5W-30, 10W-30) all have to have an operational viscosity of between 9.3-to-12.49 at 212 degrees Fahrenheit.

We can also take it a step further an look at the High Temperature/High Shear(HT/HS) rating at 302 degrees Fahrenheit to see how much protection we’re getting at the hottest points in our engine like the piston ring packs for example.

For comparison we have the published operating and HT/HS figures from the oil companies as well as calculated numbers from Widman of our oils at 68.4 degrees Fahrenheit.

So let’s imagine going out and starting our vehicle on a mild 68.4(F) degree morning. To get optimal protection here we want the closest figure to the operating viscosity of between 9.3-to-12.49. As you can see no oil in our comparison as well as any currently available on the market comes close to this. So any oil we buy is a compromise. However some are a little less of compromise than others. In order to get the least amount of compromise for our cold engine start-up at only 68.4(F), the 0W-20s are the clear winners here because their viscosities are the closest to operational viscosity.

We also notice that the premium 0W-20 synthetics listed below are a scant 0.6 of a viscosity point away from the minimum operational viscosity of xyW-30 grade motor oils, while the 5W-20s are around 0.5-to-0.2 away.

How about HT/HS, if one compares Amsoil 0W-20 to 5W-30 Castrol GTX, we’re only talking 0.1 of a viscosity point away.

So when we’re talking about the use of a 0W-20 or 5W-20, the figures are vary nil in may cases to what the engineers originally specified when they said 5W-30.

The benefit of using let’s say a 0W-20 over a 5W-30 will be for the stop-and-go drivers where the engine is operated systematically before given a chance to warm up fully. For these types of drivers, the annual savings in fuel expense will add up while the gas tank to gas tank savings probably won’t be too spectacular, but still there nonetheless.

So will a 0W-20 protect an engine well? Will a 0W-40 protect the same engine as well? There is no simple answer to this. The only way to know for sure is trend some Used Oil Analysis reports given ones equipment and driving habits.


Motor Oil..........Viscosity @ 68.4(F)..........Viscosity @ Operating Temp.........HTHS Viscosity @ 302(F)

0W-20
Amsoil 0W-20.................114.42..................8.7.................................2.8
Mobil 0W-20...................104.54...................8.7.................................2.7

5W-20
Castrol GTX 5W-20..........147.29...................9.1................................2.6
Amsoil 5W-20(ALM)..........126.58..................8.8................................2.8
Mobil 1 5W-20................122.63...................8.9...............................2.75

0W-30
Amsoil 0W-30(AZO)..........144.10.................10.5..............................3.1
Mobil 1 0W-30.................155.96..................10.9..............................3.0

5W-30
Castrol GTX 5W-30..........153.1....................10.7.............................2.9
Amsoil 5W-30(ASL)..........149.41..................10.5..............................3.2
Mobil 1 5W-30.................150.07..................11.0..............................3.1

10W-30
Castrol GTX 10W-30.......155.89..................11.31............................2.9
Amsoil 10W-30(ATM)......158.59.................10.5...............................3.2
Mobil 1 10W-30............166.31...................10.1...............................3.0

40 Grades
Mobil 1 0W-40................179.06...................13.5...............................3.8
Amsoil 5W-40(DEO) ........221.00..................14.5...............................4.0
Castrol GTX 10W-40.......172.86..................14.3...............................2.9
Amsoil 10W-40(AMO).......236.97.................14.5...............................4.3
 

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Speaking of adding Fuel to the Fire:


We must remember that Viscosity and Pour-ability do not necessarily affect Protection.


< ducks >
:) I think that is what Valvoline "sort of" told Mobil about their Mobil 1 5W-30 back in late 2008 :thumb:
According to a letter Valvoline marketers received, the result from Valvoline's testing indicate:

Valvoline SynPower's 5W-30 wear performance is at least four times better than Mobil 1 5W-30
Mobil 1 5W-30 does not meet minimum API SM or ILSAC GF-4 specification because of its inferior performance in the Sequence IVA wear test

The letter reportedly goes on to say that Valvoline notified ExxonMobil of the failed test results in September and that the company take appropriate action regarding their claim that Mobil 1 meets ILSAC GF-4 and API SM specifications, or provide substantiation that they in fact meet these specifications.
http://www.jobbersworld.com/December 11, 2008.htm
No doubt the additive package is the big source of the actual protection for wear, temperature stability and cleanliness. Flowability just helps the additives make their rounds.
 

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I wonder when they will bring out a 5W-10 and expect it to perform with the big dogs. Every little bit of extra viscosity seems to extend the life of the engine and especially so as the engine gets older and more worn. I don't think one should be timid about using a xW-30 or 40 in the 3.3L and 3.8L engine. 0W-20 or 5W-20 may not be as thin as water but are thin enough to increase engine wear compared to heavier grades.

This article, from "Machinery Lubrication" is interesting reading: http://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/518/motor-oils
Any abrasive particles equal to or larger than the oil film thickness will cause wear. Filters are necessary to keep contaminants small. The other side of the equation is oil film thickness. Thicker oil films can accommodate larger contaminants.

Temperature has a big effect on viscosity and film thickness. As a point of reference, one SAE grade increase in viscosity is necessary to overcome the influence of a 20°F increase in engine temperature. At a given reference point, there is approximately a 20°F. difference between viscosity grades SAE 30, 40 and 50. SAE 20 is somewhat closer to 30 than the other jumps, because SAE 30 must be 30°F higher than SAE 20 to be roughly the equivalent viscosity.

In other words, an SAE 20 at 190°F is about the same kinematic viscosity as an SAE 30 at 220°F, which is about the same viscosity as an SAE 40 at 240°F. This approximation works well in the 190°F to 260°F temperature range. One might be surprised at the slight amount of difference between straight viscosity vs. multiviscosity oils with the same back number (for example, SAE 30, SAE 5W-30, and SAE 10W-30).

If an SAE 50 oil at 260°F is as thin as an SAE 20 oil at 190°F, imagine how thin the oil film becomes when you are using an SAE 5W-20 and your engine overheats. When an engine overheats, the oil film becomes dangerously thin and can rupture.
Ford is bumping up against its CAFE requirements and recommends SAE 5W-20 oil for most of its engines in the United States. It claims SAE 5W-20 is optimal for fuel efficiency and wear.

To determine if SAE 5W-20 oils provide the same level of protection as SAE 5W-30 oils, Dagenham Motors in England, one of the largest Ford dealers in Europe, was consulted. SAE 5W-30 is required for warranty purposes in England, and SAE 5W-20 is not even available. If SAE 5W-20 were better for both fuel economy and wear, why would Ford not recommend it for its same engines in Europe?
High-mileage oils are a relatively new category of passenger car motor oils. These products typically contain more detergent/ dispersant and antiwear additives than new car oils. They typically contain a seal swell agent and are available in thicker viscosity grades than most new cars recommend. “High mileage” seems to be defined by “as soon as your car is out of warranty.”
With no CAFE requirements, would there also be no 5W-20? So when is 5W-10 going to become available? That has to be next. Just like with the limbo stick - how low can you go? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The real data helps...

I wonder when they will bring out a 5W-10 and expect it to perform with the big dogs. Every little bit of extra viscosity seems to extend the life of the engine and especially so as the engine gets older and more worn. I don't think one should be timid about using a xW-30 or 40 in the 3.3L and 3.8L engine. 0W-20 or 5W-20 may not be as thin as water but are thin enough to increase engine wear compared to heavier grades.

This article, from "Machinery Lubrication" is interesting reading: http://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/518/motor-oils




With no CAFE requirements, would there also be no 5W-20? So when is 5W-10 going to become available? That has to be next. Just like with the limbo stick - how low can you go? :)
The absolute statement keeps arising that the use of 5W-20 and 0W-20 WILL increase engine wear in a specific engine type but with no actual proof or data to support it.

Now, I don’t know the answer myself but will be at a better position once I see some Used Oil Analysis reports trended back to back of which WILL be real world data, not hearsay in an internet forum or oil temperatures published in a publication.

Question: Does anyone know the actual motor oil operating temperature of their personal vehicle when they’re (A) city driving; when they’re (B) highway driving?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ford Motor Company and their retroactive 5W-20 spec.

It’s interesting to note that this conversation has essentially been going on for over a decade when Ford Motor Company issued the first TSBs on this issue. Well, the recommendation still stands today and Ford seems to be doing well not having gone broke over fixings millions of vehicles due to an over sight on motor oil film strength.

After a quick Google search, I found this post below from another forum thread. Keep in mind the informant is a bit dated as we are now talking about ILSAC GF-5 and not the GF-2 and GF-3 as referenced therein. However it does still seem somewhat pertinent to our discussion here.

This question comes up regularly. It is not just Ford that recommends 5W20. Honda and Toyota (some vehicles) do also. It is unlikely that using 5W30 oil will invalidate your warranty. You would have to have an oil related failure that Ford could prove was the result of using 5W30. However, if you go to Ford and complain about lifter noise, or piston slap, or other engine complaints, one of the first things they are likely to ask you is "Are you using 5W20 Oil?" It should also be noted that the 5W20 oil is not a blanket recommendation for all Ford engines. The 4.0L V-6 in Mustangs and Explorers still requires 5W30 Oil. Here is some old verbiage on the subject from a prior post (some of the info is getting old):

There have been a number of SAE papers by US and Japanese engineers on the subject of 5W20 motor oil. Not one found that it caused durability problems. GM engineers had one paper that found that the 5W20 oil had slightly reduced bearing oil film thickness compared to 5W30, but the difference was trivial and the paper was actually describing a measurement technique. Toyota and Honda engineers have published papers that were positive about the use of 5W20. These papers claimed that their were no reliability problems associated with the switch to 5W20 oil. Here is what Ford had to say when the 5W20 was initially released (2001):

TSB 01-4-7

ISSUE:

Engine oil recommended for use in 2001 vehicles is SAE 5W-20 motor oil. This oil has an improved formulation to improve fuel economy. This oil can also be used to service some previous model year vehicles.

ACTION:

Use SAE 5W-20 engine oil at recommended oil change intervals for 2001 vehicles, with the exception of the following vehicles listed in the "Exception 2001 Vehicles" chart. All 2001 vehicles other than those listed in the "Exception 2001 Vehicles" chart are being filled with SAE 5W-20 motor oil at the factory and should also be serviced with SAE 5W-20 oil.

Vehicle Application Listing Approved For SAE 5W-20 Motor Oil:
1995-2000 2.5L Contour/Mystique
1999-2001 2.5L Cougar 1996-2001 3.0L 4V Taurus/Sable
1999-2001 3.0L (Vulcan) Ranger (Flexible Fuel and Gas), Windstar,
Taurus/Sable (Flexible Fuel and Gas)
1996-1997 3.8L Thunderbird/Cougar
1996-2001 3.8L Mustang and 3.8L SPI Windstar
1997-2001 4.2L (SPI) F-150 (under 8500 GVW only), Econoline
1996-2001 4.6L 2V Mustang
1992-2001 4.6L Crown Victoria/Grand Marquis
1991-2001 4.6L Town Car
1994-1997 4.6L 2V Thunderbird/Cougar
1996-2001 4.6L 4V Mustang Cobra
1995-2001 4.6L Continental
1993-1998 4.6L 4V Mark VIII
1998-2001 5.4L 2V/4V Navigator
1997-2001 4.6L 2V Triton F-150/250 (under 8500 GVW only), Econoline,
Expedition
1997-2001 5.4L 2V F-150/250 (under 8500 GVW only), Expedition,
E-150/250/350, E-350 Chassis/RV/Cutaway
1997-2001 6.8L E-250/350, E-350 Chassis/RV/Cutaway
1999-2001 6.8L Super Duty F-Series 250 HD/350/450/550 Motorhome
2001 2.0L Zetec/2.0L SPI Focus
2001 2.0L Zetec/3.0L Escape
2001 2.0L SPI Escort
2000-2001 5.4L/6.8L Excursion
2000-2001 3.0L Lincoln LS
2001 2.0L Zetec Escort ZX2

NOTE: THE "EXCEPTION 2001 VEHICLES" SHOULD BE SERVICED WITH SAE 5W-30 MOTOR OIL.

Exception 2001 Vehicles:
Engine Vehicle
2.5L Ranger
3.3L Villager
3.9L Lincoln LS
4.0L Ranger, Explorer/Mountaineer, Explorer Sport, and Explorer Sport Trac
5.0L Explorer/Mountaineer
NOTE: IF VEHICLE IS NOT LISTED IN THIS APPLICATION, SAE 5W-30 OIL IS
RECOMMENDED. REFER TO TSB 99-8-16.

The following Q&A's were originally posted to the Mustang newsgroup several years ago -

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS REGARDING MOTOR OIL .... [ info on ATF deleted ]


Q. Why did Motorcraft release SAE 5W-20 motor oil?
A. It was the right thing to do for the consumer and for the environment. It was one of Ford's first steps in improving the fuel economy of our SUVs by 25% by the 2005 calendar year. SAE 5W-20 improves fuel consumption by approximately 0.6 percent. For the 2001 fleet, this amounts to reducing fuel usage by more than 21 million gallons per year. This reduction in gasoline consumption leads to a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 190,000 metric tons per year, which is equivalent to taking nearly 23,100 cars and trucks off the road each year.

Q. Is there really a difference in quality between 5W-20 and 5W-30?
A. It is important to separate the differences in viscosity grade, and also the differences in the performance standards set by the International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee (ILSAC) and the accompanying American Petroleum Institute (API) performance categories to answer this question. First, SAE 5W-20 oils are slightly less viscous at operating temperature than SAE 5W-30 oils. This reduction in viscous drag contributes to reduced friction in the engine and thus improved fuel economy for an SAE 5W-20. Second, there are differences between the present ILSAC GF-2 standard (GF stands for gasoline fueled) and the soon to be commercialized GF-3 standard. The performance of a GF-3 oil will be significantly improved over a GF-2 oil. When Motorcraft released it's SAE 5W-20 formulation we wanted it to perform at the GF-3 level; but the GF-3 spec had not been finalized, so we 'guesstimated' what GF-3 would look like. In so doing we doubled the length of the standard dynamometer Sequence IIIE test (which duplicates high temperature trailer towing) which increases wear protection and reduces oil thickening. While GF-3 also improves on the standard GF-2 Sequence IIIE test, it went nowhere near as far as Ford did. This provides Motorcraft SAE 5W-20 with a significant increase over 'standard' GF-3 oils, which most SAE 5W-30 oils will meet. Taking all this into account, the Motorcraft SAE 5W-20 will be a significant improvement over most SAE 5W-30 oils.

Q. Does the difference in price between Motorcraft SAE 5W-20 and SAE 5W-30
really reflect a better oil?
A. Yes. The better base oils, and increased additives such as friction modifiers and anti oxidants used to formulate for the performance levels in the SAE 5W-20 do cost more, but reflect the significant increase in performance.

Q. What Ford and Lincoln/Mercury vehicles use SAE 5W-20 oil?
A. Approximately 80% of 2001 models should be serviced with SAE 5W-20 oils. By 2003 model year all Ford and Lincoln Mercury vehicles will be filled with SAE 5W-20 at the factory. But there are a significant number of older vehicles, some as old as 1991 models where Ford now recommends servicing with SAE 5W-20. Refer to the chart listed in Technical Service Bulletin Article No. 01-4-7 for details of which older models should use SAE 5W-20 and for the 2001 'exception' models which should continue to use SAE 5W-30.

Q. What happens if someone uses SAE 5W-20 in older vehicles?
A. As stated before some older vehicles have been approved for SAE 5W-20. However, there are many older vehicles not covered by TSB 01-4-7, and Ford is presently testing these to determine whether durability and performance would be compromised if SAE 5W-20 was used. Until this testing is successfully completed (and a TSB is published to this effect), it is not recommended using SAE 5W-20 in an older model unless specifically mentioned in TSB 01-4-7.

Q. Is Motorcraft the only brand for SAE 5W-20 motor oil?
A. No. Although SAE 5W-20 is not yet a popular viscosity grade, major marketers including Pennzoil, Quaker State, Valvoline, Exxon and others have either already begun marketing an SAE 5W-20 or have plans to do so. Customers should find this viscosity grade increasingly available in coming months, including at some retail outlets.

Q. Will SAE 5W-20 provide longer oil change intervals?
A. At the present time Ford recommends no change to the existing drain interval for SAE 5W-20. However, Ford is investigating allowing longer drain intervals since the performance level of Motorcraft SAE 5W-20 is significantly better than today's GF-2 oils.

Q. Why does Wal-Mart have Motorcraft SAE 5W-20 so much cheaper than dealers can now buy it?
A. Oil and Filter change is the number one Do-It-Yourself repair. Many Ford Motor Company customers are avid Do-It-Yourselfers. Some may purchase required products from our franchised dealerships, however, most prefer to purchase products available at mass merchandisers. If our product is not available they will buy other brands available at these retailers. Ford Motor Company has an obligation to the EPA to ensure all of our customers have access to this new oil and Wal-Mart is one of several retailers carrying Motorcraft products. Wal-Mart bought several truckloads of Motorcraft SAE 5W-20 at the original introductory price. These original quantities are still available at Wal-Mart. As Wal-Mart re-orders Motorcraft SAE 5W-20 in the future they will purchase it at the increased price. Cited at this link: http://www.mombu.com/ford/ford/t-why-5w20-oil-961624.html
 

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I'm using Toyota 0W-20 (formulated by Mobil) on my Hybrid. Perfect application for it considering the sheer number of start/stop cycles it goes through in normal usage. Definitely runs smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
0W-20: And then the real world data comes in...

What's this! 0W-20 in a high performance Lamborghini!!!

Vehicle: 2004 Lamborghini Murciélago

Engine: 572 Horsepower 6.2L V12

Location: Sarasota, Florida

Ambient Temperatures: Highs 91(F), Lows 52(F), Average 82(F)

Noted driving habits: “My wife is a high rev person, more than me, but she shifts. I sometimes run for a mile at top RPM in first gear. At other times I will run in top gear just idling at 35 MPH.”

Motor oil: The factory fill 5W-40 Agip motor oil was initially drained out and replaced with Mobil 1 0W-30 before going to Renewable Lubricants Inc. 0W-20... Yes, that’s right 0W-20 in the Lamborghini and it’s backed up by Used Oil Analysis found here - Lambo Murcielago RLI at 1,800 mi., 0W-20 – Link

"I personally used 0W-20 Mobil 1 in the 575 Maranello and for the first oil change I drained the Murcielago’s (OEM) 5W-40 Agip and replaced it with 0W-30 Mobil 1. The engine became much quieter. A valve tappet noise disappeared. I then used the 5W-20 Red Line in the Lamborghini. Used oil analysis showed that this oil worked well for my non racetrack application. The same oil went into my Maybach 57. My Enzo Ferrari calls for the Shell Helix Ultra racing 10W-60 but I have used the Castrol Syntec European Formula 0W-30. This is different than the easy to find plain 0W-30 Syntec. It MUST say European Formula across the front of the label. I buy it at AutoZone stores but it is often mixed with the plain stuff. I am now using Renewable Lubricants Inc. (RLI) 0W-30 in the Enzo and 0W-20 RLI in the new Maybach 57s AMG." Cited: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/motor-oil-106/
Now of course if he's going to go racing, he'll use a thicker oil, but for thrashing around town, the less viscous oils have proved themselves well in these high performance exotics that originally came with thicker motor oils from the factory.
 

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What's this! 0W-20 in a high performance Lamborghini!!!

Vehicle: 2004 Lamborghini Murciélago

Engine: 572 Horsepower 6.2L V12

Location: Sarasota, Florida

Ambient Temperatures: Highs 91(F), Lows 52(F), Average 82(F)

Noted driving habits: “My wife is a high rev person, more than me, but she shifts. I sometimes run for a mile at top RPM in first gear. At other times I will run in top gear just idling at 35 MPH.”

Motor oil: The factory fill 5W-40 Agip motor oil was initially drained out and replaced with Mobil 1 0W-30 before going to Renewable Lubricants Inc. 0W-20... Yes, that’s right 0W-20 in the Lamborghini and it’s backed up by Used Oil Analysis found here - Lambo Murcielago RLI at 1,800 mi., 0W-20 – Link

Now of course if he's going to go racing, he'll use a thicker oil, but for thrashing around town, the less viscous oils have proved themselves well in these high performance exotics that originally came with thicker motor oils from the factory.
Using non European 0W-20 in a 572 Horsepower 6.2L V12 engine that has a factory fill of 5W-40 says something for that guy's intelligence. Why bother changing out the 0W-20 when going racing?

As we know there's lots of hype around motor oils so one has a lot of information to consider and a lot to disbelieve. In the long term, there could be durability problems with using the 20 grade oil for the life of the engine, the engine does wear, the efficiency gains will disappear with wear and heavier is better with a worn engine.

The true test would be comparing engines for a period of 200,000 - 300,000 miles.

Synlube says: http://www.synlube.com/sae5w-20.htm
Should you use it (5W-20) in your vehicle?

The answer is simple:
You get about 1% better fuel economy, but you get 30% shorter engine life !

The above statement is based on real life experience and is comparison to SAE 5W-30 Motor Oil.
Well, I would like to see that "real life" data for sure. Now, who believes those marketeers? May as well believe Mobil 1, Pennzoil and the rest of them. :)

If 5W-20's main claim to fame is to possibly save 1% in fuel consumption, I can do better than that by wearing sneakers rather than work boots. :) If drivers were concerned about saving 1% in fuel mileage, they would ask that the speed limits be reduced or modify their driving habits. There are better ways than thinning out the motor oil. That's like sending a worm to attack an elephant.

I like this info from AMSOIL re use of 30 weight oil: http://www.worldsbestoil.ca/which-30-weight-oil.php
Which 30 Weight Oil Do I Use, 0W-30, 5W-30 or 10W-30?
All three oils are excellent motor oils and ANY one can be used in a vehicle which requires either a 0W-30, 5W-30 or 10W-30 oil as well as in several other engine applications including an engine which recommends a 5W- 20 oil.
Bottom line for me is: I don't know what the previous Owner used in my 2007 GC SXT for the first 60,000 kms, but it will never see a 0W-20 or 5W-20 during my Ownership. There are better, more logical choices out there with a m u c h longer performance record. For me, "0W-20 is like water". :lol:
 
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