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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2.5 which had a cylinder head failure. I replaced the cylinder head. The engine is now sipping coolant (#1), but only when warm.

I'm thinking of using one of the "glass" sealers to see if I can seal what is apparently a hairline crack.

Any ideas, comments or testimonials?
 

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I have a 2.5 which had a cylinder head failure. I replaced the cylinder head. The engine is now sipping coolant (#1), but only when warm.

I'm thinking of using one of the "glass" sealers to see if I can seal what is apparently a hairline crack.

Any ideas, comments or testimonials?
Glass sealer will never work, could be a failed head gasket!!:eekkkk:You might have better luck replacing a head gasket, but if I were you I would have the head checked. Where did you get the head, new or used. It don't much matter, I had the same thing happen to me and it was a new head that I had to remove again and replace. Had to do the same job twice because they didn't check their replacement heads and that was a reputable shop. Do it right and watch the problem go away.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Head was new. Gasket was new. I've done about 14 cyl head replacements / head gaskets on 2.5 and similar engines, and never had a gasket fail on install.

Prior to the new cylinder head, the water loss was significant, and was also ending up in the crankcase. After the new cylinder head, the water loss is only at operating temperature, and there is no apparent contamination of the crankcase oil.
 

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Head was new. Gasket was new. I've done about 14 cyl head replacements / head gaskets on 2.5 and similar engines, and never had a gasket fail on install.

Prior to the new cylinder head, the water loss was significant, and was also ending up in the crankcase. After the new cylinder head, the water loss is only at operating temperature, and there is no apparent contamination of the crankcase oil.
Cracked block on that little tractor engine not at all common. Block deck may be warped. I have seen that. You say head was "new?". Was it checked on a surface block prior to install? Still could be the culprit. Did you use NEW head bolts? If not could be issue also.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cracked block on that little tractor engine not at all common. Block deck may be warped. I have seen that. You say head was "new?". Was it checked on a surface block prior to install? Still could be the culprit. Did you use NEW head bolts? If not could be issue also.
The head was a new casting, an bought from a reputable supplier. All parts on it were new.

I routinely check cylinder heads with a bar and feeler gauge, nowever it was not surface block verified by me. I would assume it was during manufacture, but do not definitively know.

I did use new headbolts, as they are a torque to yield bolt. I purchased a Felpro gasket set, with bolts, and used the supplied head gasket and bolts.


Other than cleaning, and a quick check with a bar, after cleaning, I did not check the block extensively. There was a failure in the CH gasket form #1 to #2, and the piston top for #1 was scoured clean. #2 was mostly clean.

There was coolant in the crankcase oil, and it was a uniform slurry, so I assumed there was a coolant to crankcase (likely oil return galley) breach in the cylinder head. I did not turn the crank over, to examine the cylinder walls, and it remained at TDC, which obscured the #1 cylinder walls. The coolant remained in the block, but was down a bit over 1" from the top of the block. Since the car was driven home (-8F weather) when the failure occurred, the level seemed plausable.

Again, leakage is only occuring now once the engine is to temperature, and there is no sign of contamination of the engine oil in the crankcase.
 

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The head was a new casting, an bought from a reputable supplier. All parts on it were new.

I routinely check cylinder heads with a bar and feeler gauge, nowever it was not surface block verified by me. I would assume it was during manufacture, but do not definitively know.

I did use new headbolts, as they are a torque to yield bolt. I purchased a Felpro gasket set, with bolts, and used the supplied head gasket and bolts.


Other than cleaning, and a quick check with a bar, after cleaning, I did not check the block extensively. There was a failure in the CH gasket form #1 to #2, and the piston top for #1 was scoured clean. #2 was mostly clean.

There was coolant in the crankcase oil, and it was a uniform slurry, so I assumed there was a coolant to crankcase (likely oil return galley) breach in the cylinder head. I did not turn the crank over, to examine the cylinder walls, and it remained at TDC, which obscured the #1 cylinder walls. The coolant remained in the block, but was down a bit over 1" from the top of the block. Since the car was driven home (-8F weather) when the failure occurred, the level seemed plausable.

Again, leakage is only occuring now once the engine is to temperature, and there is no sign of contamination of the engine oil in the crankcase.
Is the thermostat new and installed right side up, how old is the radiator. Was there any sealant added to the cooling system.
 

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A leakdown test will tell whats going on. E.g. http://www.vmaxoutlaw.com/tech/leakdown_tester.htm

just google leakdown test for more info

The head was a new casting, an bought from a reputable supplier. All parts on it were new.

... snipped ...

Again, leakage is only occuring now once the engine is to temperature, and there is no sign of contamination of the engine oil in the crankcase.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I did a compression test, and a differential leakdown test. (Have equipment.) No problems found.

I talked with friend who has rebuilt more motors than I've ever touched...he said that he thinks the catalytic converter and muffler are full of coolant, and that is why I have white smoke. His suggestion is to take it on a 30 mile drive. We agreed to something more conservative...and that is to idle it in the driveway for 30 or 45 minutes.

He said he had a 6 cyl motorcycle with a blown head gasket, and it took 30 miles of riding it before the exhaust was normal.

So his opinion is attractive, and I will give it a try this weekend.
 

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Although I'm never really comfortable using products like this, Bar's stop Leak has work for me before and never caused any problems. I'd try them before tearing the motor apart again.
 

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Although I'm never really comfortable using products like this, Bar's stop Leak has work for me before and never caused any problems. I'd try them before tearing the motor apart again.
:Wow1: I did 0nce and it plugged up my heater core!
 

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I have a 2.5 which had a cylinder head failure. I replaced the cylinder head. The engine is now sipping coolant (#1), but only when warm.

I'm thinking of using one of the "glass" sealers to see if I can seal what is apparently a hairline crack.

Any ideas, comments or testimonials?
I thought you said the engine was sipping coolant which relates to a loss of coolant in the system. Your friend is right if there is no coolant loss.
 

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I think if it;s showing symptoms and the test didnt find any problem,
then there must be something wrong with the test. Like the link says,
the crank should be turned over (by hand) to expose a cylinder crack,
since the pistons have to travel along the cylinder, one by one, while
air is pumped into it. Compression test is of little value, although that's
what I started out with a long time ago.

I had coolant in the oil in my maxima, but that was b/c the water pump
was leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It's difficult to do a leakdown test in this vehicle. Automatic transmission doesn't help. To control each piston's position becomes even more difficult, coupled with valve position.

I did say sipping coolant, because the coolant level was going down a small amount, while testing the vehicle. However, that could also be air purging from the system, while it ran. Hard to say.

Also, to be clear on the stop leak formulations: there are two different types. Perhaps more. Some rely on small particles jambing into leaks. This need to be replenished when coolant is removed from teh system. Also this type _does_ tend to clog heater cores. Had a family member's car clog up after they used this kind, and I ended up using a garden hose in 10F weather to get the heater core flowing again. The other type uses a silicate which turns to "glass" when exposed to air. A local farmer who I consulted with, said he has used the latter when there are small, unknown source leaks, and he has had good luck. One road vehicle he used it on was a car, which he continued to own and use for 3 years, until sold.

After I try flushing out the exhaust...I'll post a follow-up. But at this point, the opinion is that the block is not cracked, and that I am just seeing residual coolant in the exhaust system boil off.
 

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Some of the shifty car lots use headgasket sealer additives, although its not really honest when selling a car, the stuff does work well if you want to keep an older car on the road or you don't have the money to repair it.
 
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