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Our 2010 DGC 4.0 V6 just crossed 101,000 miles so it was high time to replace the timing belt, and spark plugs while I was in there. Turns out, removing the spark plugs while doing the belt service makes it that much easier.

There's not much on the old intarwebs about the 4.0 V6. There's a bit about the 3.5 V6, but most of what you find is the longitudinally mounted version in the Charger / 300, so that doesn't apply to us in the FWD minivans.

Before we get started, here's a tip: Get a box of ziplock bags and a sharpie. As bolts / nuts are removed, put them in a new bag and write on the bag where they go. Another tip is to write the nut sizes on the bag as well. This makes re-assembly so much easier.



Park the van in neutral, and disconnect the battery.



Here's the engine, minus the cover:




First step, unbolt the PS reservoir (10MM)


Remove the air box, upper and lower sections.


Remove the eight 10mm bolts to the upper intake plenum. Also two nuts and two studs on the front leading edge holding on the PS hose, two screws at the back holding on an EGR tube, and of course, several vacuum hoses.






Continued next post...
 

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Underside of the plenum. Didn't realize it was a variable runner length intake until I saw the IMRC valves underneath.


Jacked up the van, pulled off the right front wheel, and pulled back the fender liner. Moving the fender liner is not necessary, but I did anyway for more access.



Remove the serpentine belt, then the alternator.



Three bolts for the PS pump. Note the holes in the pulley to gain access to the bolts.



PS pump moved aside and alternator removed.



We are about to remove one of the engine mounts, so support the passenger side of the engine with a jack.


Some youtube videos I saw recommended loosening the engine brace that runs underneath, and I did, but I don't think it was necessary.



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Engine mount removed, and harmonic balancer / crank pulley removed as well.



I used a tool like this one from Advance Auto's tool rental program, and it worked great. Mind you I have an impact gun to loosen the pulley so it came off easily with that.

Shot from the wheel well at this point.



Nearly everything I've removed at this point:



Remove the front bank's timing cover (this is what the alternator bolts to). The timing belt sees the sun for the first time in many moons. Note the rubber dust covering everything inside.



Lower cover removed. Full belt revealed!



Water pump looks decent. No leaks.



Somehow the day before as my wife drove the van in the garage the day before, she shut off the engine exactly at TDC!



There's a mark on each cam gear that lines up with a mark above them, and the crank has an arrow on it pointing to a spot on the block. So you have three reference points to check for TDC.

If your engine didn't land at TDC, no worries. We've got the intake plenum off, so just remove the coil on plugs (COP) and the spark plugs, and the engine will turn easily since it's not compressing against six spark plugs.

Find the ballcock on the radiator, slide up a bucket, and drain the radiator.



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Remove the tensioner.



You may have to turn the axle shaft a bit to get enough room for the tensioner to slip out, but it will come out with the axle shaft still in place. You did remember to park the van in neutral, right?

Timing belt should slip off easily.

Looks like this was the original belt since it was a Mopar / Gates part.



Old belt on the left, new on the right.







I've changed a few water pumps in my years as a shadetree mechanic, and lots of them have bolts that are different lengths. This was no different. I drew an outline of the WP on a piece of cardboard with holes for each bolt to help me remember where each one went.



Sure enough, there were some bolts longer than others.



Got the pump off, and took a closer look at the gasket. It probably was going to start weeping soon. Notice the gasket is shifted a bit near the bolt hole, compared to the new one.



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A closer look.



I start to put the new water pump on, and then promptly break one of the bolts off into the block. :angry1:



I took the pump back off, put some vice grips on the chunk of the bolt sticking out, and find it's fairly loose in the block. It came out with some slow turning. WHEW! :headbange Off to Lowes for a stainless steel bolt.

I took off the timing belt tensioner, and discover replacement pulley my kit came with is different.



Back out to Advance for a chat with them. They suggest calling the Dayco support line. I get in touch with them, and they've never seen a pulley like this. :jpshakehe They offered no help. I decided to grind down the bolt I removed to shorten it about an inch.

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Installed the new tensioner.



After installing the new belt and getting everything tight, the instruction says to turn the engine two revolutions back to TDC and compare the crank marks to the cam gear TDC marks. My rear bank cam was about 2 teeth off, so I had to remove the belt and try again.

This time I discovered I could put longer flat blade screwdrivers along the belt path to hold them taught while I get the loose side of the belt arranged properly. This worked much better than just trying to install it without something holding the belt tight in places where it should be.





That was all of the pictures that I took, so reassembly was just reversing my steps. Overall, not the most difficult job, but it was simplified by air tools (impact gun, ratchet) and the smaller Chrysler style harmonic balancer puller.
 

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Thanks awesome write up and pics. How long did this take? When is the next time you are in Toronto Ontario Canada so you can do mine?
 

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thanks for the heads up. I'll have to challenge my mechanic about it. he think it's a timing chain in that motor.
 

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Thanks awesome write up and pics. How long did this take? When is the next time you are in Toronto Ontario Canada so you can do mine?
Thanks. I took my time and it took me about 12 hours total time to complete. However, this was with me taking a lunch break, and futzing around with Advance Auto on the wrong pulley which included a couple of trips back to the store, and time spent grinding down the bolt. I had a week of vacation to burn, so I wasn't in a huge hurry to get it done in one day.

I'd say this saved me $300 or so vs having a shop do it. Probably closer to $500 compared to having a dealer do it. The kit I got from Advance was $180, and it included a belt, water pump, gasket, tensioner, and tensioner pulley. I think the Mopar belt alone from the dealer is close to $200 just for the part!
 

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Excellent write-up! :thumb: Thank you!
 

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Does anyone know if this would be the identical procedure for 2008 T&C with the 4.0?
Most likely would be considering that it's in the same generation van and the exact same engine and mounting positions, etc...
 

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thanks for this write up, my water pump has started leaking so it looks like ill be taking this job on in the very near future :angrya::mad:
2010 T&C with 83K maybe I'll do plugs too :thumb:
 

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Great write up, lots of good pics. Definitely saving and subscribing for when it's time to do this job.

Was it really even necessary to use a new tensioner and pulley? Years ago when I helped a friend do the timing belt on a 3.5L intrepid, we re-used both the pulley and the tensioner. We retracted the tensioner in a bench vise and then just stuck a little drill bit on the hole to hold the center piece down until we were ready to put tension on the new belt. I didn't think these were wear items.

I've also heard of people counting the number of grooves in the old timing belt between the two cams so that they know about where the new belt has to be to get the timing marks to line up.
 

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Definetely change the tensioner. I have read a post where it was not changed, when it failed it took out the new belt and the interference engine.
 

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Definetely change the tensioner. I have read a post where it was not changed, when it failed it took out the new belt and the interference engine.
I've seen more belts go, and the valves along with them, caused by the tensioner pulley bearing failing, than the belt failing.
 

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Was it really even necessary to use a new tensioner and pulley?
Yes. The tensioner is similar to a strut or a shock absorber. It contains pressurized gas that can eventually leak or degrade in performance over time. Kinda silly to ignore it when you're that far into the engine for just a few more bucks.
 
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