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After installing the new belt and getting everything tight, the instruction says to turn the engine two revolutions back to TDC and compare the crank marks to the cam gear TDC marks. My rear bank cam was about 2 teeth off, so I had to remove the belt and try again.

Thanks for the great write up! I have a question about 1 cam being off while the other cam and crankshaft are TDC.

We got a new timing belt on, did 2 turns and the front Cam was 1 tooth off. BUT it gets worse... We took the belt off to adjust the front Cam, I assumed I could just put a socket on that Cam and give a little turn which I did but it ended up 'jumping' quite a bit and went about 1/4 of a turn clockwise! So now, the Rear Cam and Crankshaft are TDC and the front Cam is off by about 1/4 of a turn.

I'm guessing this isn't a freewheeling engine, so doesn't this mean I'll have to remove the valve cover/valve train rocker and remove the bolts on the Cam to turn in back 1/4 of a turn back to TDC??
Basically I'm looking for info on how to get that front Cam back in sync with the other Cam and Crankshaft.

Here's an example, the Red line shows where my front Cam's TDC mark is sitting now.




Thanks!
 

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Thanks for the great write up! I have a question about 1 cam being off while the other cam and crankshaft are TDC.

We got a new timing belt on, did 2 turns and the front Cam was 1 tooth off. BUT it gets worse... We took the belt off to adjust the front Cam, I assumed I could just put a socket on that Cam and give a little turn which I did but it ended up 'jumping' quite a bit and went about 1/4 of a turn clockwise! So now, the Rear Cam and Crankshaft are TDC and the front Cam is off by about 1/4 of a turn.

I'm guessing this isn't a freewheeling engine, so doesn't this mean I'll have to remove the valve cover/valve train rocker and remove the bolts on the Cam to turn in back 1/4 of a turn back to TDC??
Basically I'm looking for info on how to get that front Cam back in sync with the other Cam and Crankshaft.

Here's an example, the Red line shows where my front Cam's TDC mark is sitting now.




Thanks!
Just rotate front camshaft backwards to line it up. Don't use a ratchet.
 

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Just rotate front camshaft backwards to line it up. Don't use a ratchet.
Thank you for the quick reply!!

Don't use a ratchet & I don't need to remove the valve cover to loosen the Cam? So just use my hands on the Cam sprocket? I have already tried turning it back, it feels springy, it sort of bounces. It does this clockwise and counter clockwise. I felt like I was putting a decent amount of pressure on it, to the point that I worried I might break something trying to turn it back... Is this not the case? It's safe to just turn it back, even if it's requiring a decent amount of force?

I'm curious why to not use a ratchet? Just to ensure I don't use too much force and go too far the other way?

Thanks again.
 

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Valve springs are being compressed by the camshaft lobes as it's rotated. It will tend to bump ahead or back as you try to align it... You can use your socket on the camshaft bolt, but it may run away from you if using a ratchet. You'll have more control with a non-ratcheting socket driver such as a breaker bar, or a closed-end wrench.
 

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Valve springs are being compressed by the camshaft lobes as it's rotated. It will tend to bump ahead or back as you try to align it... You can use your socket on the camshaft bolt, but it may run away from you if using a ratchet. You'll have more control with a non-ratcheting socket driver such as a breaker bar, or a closed-end wrench.
Understood! Thank you very much!!
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Valve springs are being compressed by the camshaft lobes as it's rotated. It will tend to bump ahead or back as you try to align it... You can use your socket on the camshaft bolt, but it may run away from you if using a ratchet. You'll have more control with a non-ratcheting socket driver such as a breaker bar, or a closed-end wrench.
Umm, I would definitely not use a wrench on that bolt as it may loosen the cam sprocket bolt. You should be able to wedge something in the gear for leverage and rotate it that way, then wedge a screwdriver or something else against the gear and timing cover to hold it in place while you position the belt.
 

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Umm, I would definitely not use a wrench on that bolt as it may loosen the cam sprocket bolt. You should be able to wedge something in the gear for leverage and rotate it that way, then wedge a screwdriver or something else against the gear and timing cover to hold it in place while you position the belt.
I don't believe you would be able to do it that way, due to the pressure on the cam lobes, cam will rotate very quickly not allowing you to properly set the timing. A socket/wrench must be used, just try to go clockwise direction.
 

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Thank you for the quick reply!!

Don't use a ratchet & I don't need to remove the valve cover to loosen the Cam? So just use my hands on the Cam sprocket? I have already tried turning it back, it feels springy, it sort of bounces. It does this clockwise and counter clockwise. I felt like I was putting a decent amount of pressure on it, to the point that I worried I might break something trying to turn it back... Is this not the case? It's safe to just turn it back, even if it's requiring a decent amount of force?

I'm curious why to not use a ratchet? Just to ensure I don't use too much force and go too far the other way?

Thanks again.
Umm, I would definitely not use a wrench on that bolt as it may loosen the cam sprocket bolt. You should be able to wedge something in the gear for leverage and rotate it that way, then wedge a screwdriver or something else against the gear and timing cover to hold it in place while you position the belt.
The cam will turn with much less force then the torque on that cam bolt, your not going to loosen it.

You can use a large set of pliers on the hex flats of the cam gear:


There are tools, I have this one:


You can make them:


No need to remove the valve cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
The cam will turn with much less force then the torque on that cam bolt, your not going to loosen it.

You can use a large set of pliers on the hex flats of the cam gear:


There are tools, I have this one:


You can make them:


No need to remove the valve cover.
Your pictures kinda proved my point for me. They are turning the cam by the cam gear and not the cam gear bolt which can loosen. Is the cam gear keyed so it fits on the cam only one way? Probably, but I don't want to be a dummy and loosen a bolt that I don't have to.
 

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Just curious, if I wanted to only replace the timing belt, does the intake still need to be take off?
It wouldn't be impossible without removing intake plenum, but easier if you do... You can then also access your spark plugs.

... There's a mark on each cam gear that lines up with a mark above them, and the crank has an arrow on it pointing to a spot on the block. So you have three reference points to check for TDC.

If your engine didn't land at TDC, no worries. We've got the intake plenum off, so just remove the coil on plugs (COP) and the spark plugs, and the engine will turn easily since it's not compressing against six spark plugs.
 

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Rainy day project- not for beginners

My 2010 4.0L T&C just hit 95k and we had a nice weekend here where it was supposed to rain all weekend. So I decided to tackle the project. I did my homework on the project, laid out all my tools the day before, and double checked the parts before beginning. The write-up and a video were very helpful in providing a definitive way to disassemble. The project took roughly 8 hours to complete by myself and that was hustling.

The belt is tough to get on and tight. I used the screw driver method and clips which made it easy. There was also a lot of doubt when I installed it as it was 1/2 tooth off even after the hydraulic tensioner was released. There is a video out there that a guy explains do not worry about the 1/2 tooth because that is due to the tensioner not fully engaged. So I tried not to worry.

There were a few errors along the way. I had a bad thread on my power steering pump that I had to fix, the harmonic balancer installtion tool was the wrong thread pitch from O'riley's so I made a homemade one with 3.5" M12 x 1.75 pitch screw+nut, and after startup, I had a rough idle which was fixed because my throttle position sensor was not plugged in. fEWWWW thought first the timing was off.

I guess I realized no matter how prepped you are you will always encounter the unexpected. So make sure you have ample time.

:headbange:headbange:headbange:headbange:headbange
 

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Can someone update the pictures on the original posts? All the pictures are gone. I need to do this to my van soon and would like the pictures to go with the descriptions.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Thanks for the link to the Chrome extension. Photobucket destroyed nearly every car forum out there when they stopped allowing third party hosting.
 

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Thanks for the link to the Chrome extension. Photobucket destroyed nearly every car forum out there when they stopped allowing third party hosting.
No problem, I believe it was posted a couple of times before, but always gets lost in the crowd. Since day one I knew it had to be a workaround, Google results always showed images intact, so it was just a matter of time before someone discover Google's secrets.

Don't blame photobucket either. Many business were using their service commercially without paying any fees, they just had to do something about it.

Hope it worked for you.
 

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Thank you SO much for this post. I was able to replace the timing belt on my 2009 Dodge Grand Caravan with help from this post.

When I was done, I noticed the idle was a little rough (it was very smooth before). I took it all apart and it looked like the timing belt was off by a tooth so I re-positioned it. All three marks were TDC. However, the idle is still a little rough!

The crankshaft pulley kinda looks like it's wobbling, but I don't know how it looked before. I did hit it with a rubber mallet to get it on the snout because I couldn't find a installer tool or bolt long enough to reach the threads. Here's a video of the wobble:


The EGR and spark plugs are all relatively new. I replaced the air filter, PCV valve, and cleaned the throttle body. I've looked for vacuum leaks with brake cleaner fluid, but didn't find any.

Any ideas? I don't know what to check next.
 

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I did this job a few months ago and don't remember exactly how I put the crank pulley back on.

I used the Autozone rental puller to get it out. I believe I used a bolt that was longer than the OEM one to get it to push the pulley back in. It does look like the pulley in your video is not seated correctly.
 
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