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2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 4.0
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (4.0) with just over 126k miles. A few months ago the engine shut off while backing into a parking spot. Happened again one more time and then went incident free for a couple months. Just over a week ago the engine began to die while driving. It's always been on local roads, while traveling at low speeds. The electrical system stays on, but the traction control light illuminates, power steering goes out and engine stops. Once I pull off the road and put the vehicle in park, it starts right back up. I see similar stories posted, lots of suggestions as to what may be causing the issue, but no actual resolution. My van was part of the recall for the ignition issue, and this was replaced by the dealer. I had it at the mechanic after the stalling began. He checked for codes (there were none) and cleaned the carbon build up from the trottle body.
 

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Remote start? Aftermarket?
Security system? Aftermarket?
 

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2009 GCV SE
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Sounds to me like the throttle body was gunked up and was sticky, as all the times you have described were with the pedal at idle or almost. If the body is sticky enough the moment you add gas and it sticks it will probably stall out the vehicle.

I've had it happen to my F150, backing up and the moment I added gas it stalled. Did it 3 times and I then cleaned the throttle body, never came back since.

As for the loss of power steering, the pump will only work as long as the engine is running, so the moment the engine stops so does the pump.
 

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It does have factory remote start, which I almost never use. No security system.
Problems with remote start can cause an engine to shut down while driving. Can you turn yours off?

Check for recalls for your 2010. The ignition switch can wiggle its way to the accessories position per this Post:

 
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2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 4.0
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sounds to me like the throttle body was gunked up and was sticky, as all the times you have described were with the pedal at idle or almost. If the body is sticky enough the moment you add gas and it sticks it will probably stall out the vehicle.

I've had it happen to my F150, backing up and the moment I added gas it stalled. Did it 3 times and I then cleaned the throttle body, never came back since.

As for the loss of power steering, the pump will only work as long as the engine is running, so the moment the engine stops so does the pump.
Thanks, though the mechanic cleaned the rhrottle body after the problem started, infortunately it is still happening.
 

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2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 4.0
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Problems with remote start can cause an engine to shut down while driving. Can you turn yours off?

Check for recalls for your 2010. The ignition switch can wiggle its way to the accessories position per this Post:

I'll look into shutting off remote start. As for the ignition recall, the dealership swapped that out several years ago.
 

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Maybe wear. Lots of weight on your key chain can do ii. Perhaps the replacement part is not much better than the original.
Is the ignition going into the accessory position?
 

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2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 4.0
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Maybe wear. Lots of weight on your key chain can do ii. Perhaps the replacement part is not much better than the original.
Is the ignition going into the accessory position?
ACC and ON are so close together, I dont think it's possible to tell. I'll pay closer attention next time.
 

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ACC and ON are so close together, I dont think it's possible to tell. I'll pay closer attention next time.
If the car is in ACC, all the dash lights will turn off and gauges will be all at 0, climate control will turn off as well.

in run the lights are on and gauges will be at their respective values climate on. So if your fuel gauge drops to 0 you know you're no longer in the run position.
 

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2009 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (3.8); 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan eL (3.8)
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Ima put my money on failing EGR...... All 4.0s do it at some point in their lives, usually not long after 100k miles.
Now that you mention it I do recall several threads where a bad EGR valve on the 4.0L caused stalling. I believe in at least one case they attributed the bad EGR valve to a leaky heater wye spraying coolant into the valve.
 

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2009 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (3.8); 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan eL (3.8)
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Here's recent confirmation that the EGR valve can cause stalling:
2009 Grand Caravan 4.0L with 135,000 began randomly stalling while driving about 6 months ago. As time went on this became more frequent. I did notice it was always after a cold start and always around the same climbing engine temp. It would just die, with no stuttering or anything else. I was able to shift to neutral and immediately restart, but it was both annoying and rather sporty to deal with when it happened in the middle of a turn. It would only die once and would not happen when the vehicle was already at operating temperature. Was starting to think the TIPM was bad, since it never set a fault code. Finally, two weeks ago it set a P406. Changed out the EGR valve and it hasn't stalled since then.
 

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EGR valve is part of the emissions system. Any time I have had an EGR problem, which hasn't been recently, there was a code confirming it.
EGR issue causing stalling while driving sounds like Russian Roulette.

Just over a week ago the engine began to die while driving. It's always been on local roads, while traveling at low speeds. The electrical system stays on, but the traction control light illuminates, power steering goes out and engine stops.
The clue is there, one would think. Local roads could be bumpy. Something electrical, I'm guessing. If it's ignition going to the accessories mode, due to wear and/or a heavy key chain, plus a bumpy ride, then it would restart right away for sure.

A battery disconnect, computer reboot might clear up glitches. Always good to do in any event.
 
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EGR valve is part of the emissions system. Any time I have had an EGR problem, which hasn't been recently, there was a code confirming it.
EGR issue causing stalling while driving sounds like Russian Roulette.



The clue is there, one would think. Local roads could be bumpy. Something electrical, I'm guessing. If it's ignition going to the accessories mode, due to wear and/or a heavy key chain, plus a bumpy ride, then it would restart right away for sure.

A battery disconnect, computer reboot might clear up glitches. Always good to do in any event.
EGR failures on 5th gens RARELY cause a code until the van is dying so often it's undriveable.
 

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1997 Plymouth Grand Voyager Rallye
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There's a lot of sensors and emissions equipment on any modern engine, but very few of them have the power to kill the engine while driving at speed and under load. EGR, MAP, TPS, CTS, Knock Sensor, IAT, O2 sensors, none of these should be able to stop the engine while it's under load, only make it run poorly. If the EGR malfunctions, it should only cause issues at low throttle and low engine speeds, since all it does is allow a small amount of air into the intake. If it gets stuck open or closed, it could swamp or starve an engine at idle, but if it gets stuck while the engine is at moderate load, it's only going to throw off the air to fuel ratio a tiny bit.

The van needs to be checked for stored diagnostic codes, just because the check engine light is off doesn't mean that there aren't active or previous codes. Camshaft or crankshaft position sensors will rarely cause an illuminated check engine light, and they're the only two sensors that the engine can't run without. Most Cam and Crank sensor codes can be pulled with an OBD2 scanner even though they don't light up the Check Engine Light.
If the Cam or Crank sensor has a fault, 99% of the time that fault will kill the engine. While the engine is off, and the key is in run (like right before you hit the starter or right after the engine stalls), all of the dash lights are supposed to illuminate to prove that the system they represent is powered on and the idiot light on the dash works. So when a cam or crank sensor malfunctions, the engine will almost always shut down, and you're back to all of the dash lights being on. If that fault is intermittent, the engine will fire right back up and the check engine light will go off, because restarting the engine wiped the active codes and the cam/crank sensor is now working. Since the engine can't run without it, it's nearly impossible for the sensor to be malfunctioning while the engine is running, which means the check engine light won't be on while the engine is running if it's faulty, because it must be working at the moment for the engine to run. Hopefully that makes sense, I could of worded it better and not had a big circular logic explanation.


AutoZone, O'Reilly's, or any of the other major national parts stores should be able to pull codes for you from the OBD2 port and print off a list of what they find with possible causes, and they do it for free.

Fuel pump, maybe. Odd that it would immediately start back up every time, I'd also think if it was failing in such an odd way that there'd be a sudden drop in fuel pressure so as to generate a check engine light for random cylinder misfire.

Something could be triggering the auto-shutdown. We have a relay specifically called the Auto-Shut-Down-Relay on the older vans, not sure if the 5th gens do to but regardless all modern vehicles have a means to immediately kill the fuel supply and engine electrical power in the event of a crash. If the Airbag control module, engine immobilizer circuit, or some other safety system saw something it didn't like for a split second, it's definitely possible for it to kill the motor.
 
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