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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just completed the read rotor/pad replacement on a 2010 T&C, but the new pads didn't feature the two "tabs" that are supposed to engage the caliper piston, nor did the old pads that were supposedly installed by a dealer!

Was there some kind of change in the pad-maker's/service protocol "opinion" that the tabs were no longer relevant?
 

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I did brakes on my 2014 a few days ago. The OE rears had a single pin per side, as did the PowerStop replacements. However, the FSM implies not all pads will have a pin:

Gesture Font Drawing Circle Diagram
 

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I did brakes on my 2014 a few days ago. The OE rears had a single pin per side, as did the PowerStop replacements. However, the FSM implies not all pads will have a pin:

View attachment 67397
Worked on a 2013 Honda CRV that had a "drum in hat" rear ebrake. No pin required there. Perhaps some Chryslers are the same. Certainly applies to the 4th Generation vans.

Back to OP: Inner and outer pads maybe? Wear indicators on "leading" edge?


"The leading edge of a brake pad is the one that may be thought of as first touching the rotor as it turns. If your calipers are mounted behind the wheel axis, the bottom pad edges will lead."

"As a rule of thumb, the wear indicator should be placed so that it faces the leading edge of the spinning rotor. For example, on the drivers side, the wheel is spinning counter clockwise (as you face it), so the wear indicator is placed on the right side of the caliper. Note that this could be facing either up or down, depending on the position the caliper is mounted to the axle (forward or behind the axle)."
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Worked on a 2013 Honda CRV that had a "drum in hat" rear ebrake. No pin required there. Perhaps some Chryslers are the same. Certainly applies to the 4th Generation vans.

Back to OP: Inner and outer pads maybe? Wear indicators on "leading" edge?


"The leading edge of a brake pad is the one that may be thought of as first touching the rotor as it turns. If your calipers are mounted behind the wheel axis, the bottom pad edges will lead."

"As a rule of thumb, the wear indicator should be placed so that it faces the leading edge of the spinning rotor. For example, on the drivers side, the wheel is spinning counter clockwise (as you face it), so the wear indicator is placed on the right side of the caliper. Note that this could be facing either up or down, depending on the position the caliper is mounted to the axle (forward or behind the axle)."
Nope, neither the original inboard or outboard pads had pins (yes, the wear indicators were on the inboard pads). It could be that data over time showed that the pins on the pad really served no useful purpose.
 

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No purpose for pins on the back of the pad. Just adds to installation complexity and confusion, and source of error if not aligned. They are not going anywhere.
 

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But ..... there are large slots, or spaces, on the piston to take a "not necessary" tab, right? That adds 5 cents to the cost of the piston. The beancounters wouldn't go for that extra, redundant expense, when it's totalled up, would they? :)

The Raybestos R-Line rear pads, that I used on the 2016 last year, had a tab on the back. Good thing my caliper pistons had a slotted space for the tabs to fit in.

Some blame General Motors for introducing or designing the integrated parking brake caliper for cars.

Anyway, without tabs = easier installation. Wonder why they were necessaery all the years previous.
 

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The slots in the caliper piston are there to accommodate the reset tool - not the inboard pad.
 

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I think the intent was to keep the piston from rotating when the park brake actuating screw inside the caliper turns to push the piston out to apply the park brake. If the piston turns with the screw it won’t move out and put pressure on the pad. The piston seal and boot do a pretty good job of keeping the piston from rotating, so maybe they decided the pins aren’t needed.
 
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