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Discussion Starter #1
My dad's caravan with almost 95,000 miles has had issues for a few months when in reverse. It start out being kind of jerky going backwards, and now it can't go up hills in reverse and the throttle seems to do nothing to make it go faster. There was a code for an issue with the VSS so I replaced it which seemed to make the issue a little better (but really could have just been a placebo) but it didn't go away completely. I tried disconnecting the battery to reset the controller as suggested on a thread where someone posted about having a similar issue. The trans fluid has also been changed since the issues started happening, and it now has the same code about the VSS as before. What else can I do from here to try to diagnose the issue?
 

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Since you said the fluid was changed, I'm going to assume the filter was too. About how much fluid did you put back into it? It was ATF+4, right?

If the problem existed before the fluid change and that didn't help much, you'll need to check the solenoids that control reverse. I'm at work right now and don't have time to look it over, but here's the fluid path diagram for reverse.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Since you said the fluid was changed, I'm going to assume the filter was too. About how much fluid did you put back into it? It was ATF+4, right?

If the problem existed before the fluid change and that didn't help much, you'll need to check the solenoids that control reverse. I'm at work right now and don't have time to look it over, but here's the fluid path diagram for reverse.
Thanks for the reply.
It was our mechanic who changed the fluid, I trust that he put in the right amount though. I have no idea how to check the solenoids, that PDF might as well be hieroglyphics to me.

EDIT: just found this. https://gearsmagazine.com/magazine/saving-some-dollars-rebuilding-62te-solenoid-packs/. I'll check the resistance either tomorrow or sunday.
 

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It would be best to do the whole valve body because there could be wear in the bores from the lack of fluid pressure. But if you are on a tight budget doing just the bad solenoid may buy you some time until you are able to afford the whole thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It would be best to do the whole valve body because there could be wear in the bores from the lack of fluid pressure. But if you are on a tight budget doing just the bad solenoid may buy you some time until you are able to afford the whole thing.
thank you. I'll post again when I've tested the solenoids.
 

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All solenoids read 2 ohms? Did you check the resistance between your leads and subtract that from the measured value?

I haven't had any reason to check mine, so I don't know if that .2 ohms is a big enough difference to cause an issue or if it's normal. I'd tend to agree that such difference is likely fine, which puts us back to a fluid pressure problem. I don't know of any affordable tools to check that.

Does your mechanic have a good scanner that can monitor transmission live data? If so, have him monitor line pressure and clutch actuation to see if anything looks abnormal.
 

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Some ohm meters aren't very accurate when it comes to very low impedance, that might be the case here. I'd think those numbers wouldn't be worth worrying about.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
All solenoids read 2 ohms? Did you check the resistance between your leads and subtract that from the measured value?

I haven't had any reason to check mine, so I don't know if that .2 ohms is a big enough difference to cause an issue or if it's normal. I'd tend to agree that such difference is likely fine, which puts us back to a fluid pressure problem. I don't know of any affordable tools to check that.

Does your mechanic have a good scanner that can monitor transmission live data? If so, have him monitor line pressure and clutch actuation to see if anything looks abnormal.
only tested the reverse solenoid. I'll have to talk to my mechanic about that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So my dad scanned for codes and said that there was just something for the speed sensor, but I just scanned for codes and got these:
IMG_20200320_180918727.jpg
57647
57648
57649
 

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Yep, that intermediate shaft speed sensor code is typical of a compounder failure. That and the reverse ratio code spell doom. TCC solenoid probably fried trying to lock up when it didn't have enough fluid flowing due to the trans's mechanical condition.

Sadly, it is rebuild time. If you can afford it, Jasper sells a beefed up remanufactured transmission for around $3,500 with a good warranty. The build them with the Ram Promaster in mind. That's the way I'll go whenever I end up needing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So I'm thinking about either rebuilding or replacing the transmission myself, I found what seems to be a good video about how to remove and replace it.
Trying to figure out what tools I need. And once I have it out, this guy seems to know what he's doing and have a series of videos where he rebuild a 62te (though the video quality is pretty bad). If I were to rebuild, would it be best to jut go with the mopar master rebuild kit? And what about getting a low millage transmission from a salvage yard? A transmission at my local pull-a-part is only $87.31 plus tax and the core charge.
 

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If you're going to rebuild it yourself, might as well get a master rebuild kit. I would avoid incomplete kits. As for brand, I don't know what if any difference in quality it would make going Mopar or aftermarket.

How low of mileage are you talking about? If it's over 100k it could potentially have issues, since people tend to not change their transmission fluid as they should. If you do go that route it might be worth keeping your old one and rebuilding it for when the junkyard trans dies.

And if you are doing this yourself and you have a friend that has a lift and trans jack, do it on the lift. It's SO much easier on a lift. Sure it can be done with a regular hoist, but it will take nearly twice as long and be significantly harder.
 
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