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2014 T&C - Transmission Oil Cooler Lines?

14115 Views 16 Replies 10 Participants Last post by  keep_hope
I have a 2014 T&C with leaking transmission oil cooler lines. As a hobby, this year I started doing a lot of my own auto repairs, so I was thinking of replacing the lines myself. Surprisingly the lines are very accessible and it doesn't look like there's too much to the job. Having never done it though, I wanted to ask those that have... Is there anything specific to watch out for on this job? (Short of replacing any lost fluid) Do these lines need to be bled or anything after replacing them? Or does it not matter if air enters the system? Thanks in advance for any feedback!
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I have a 2014 T&C with leaking transmission oil cooler lines. As a hobby, this year I started doing a lot of my own auto repairs, so I was thinking of replacing the lines myself. Surprisingly the lines are very accessible and it doesn't look like there's too much to the job.
You could zip-cut off the crimped aluminum hose ends to replace just the rubber hoses and use hose clamps... You could also get new lines from Rock Auto already, but they won't be any better than the crimped originals.

I have always used bulk 5/16" fuel injection hose from the auto parts store. It never leaks, no cracking and the hose doesn't get soft.
I have only ever found trans cooler/power steering bulk hose in 3/8" and 11/32".
Good advice and I think that I'll do this... Just to confirm though... I shouldn't need to bleed/purge the system after replacing the hoses, correct? My limited understanding is that the transmission will self-purge out any air.
Yes, it will vent. The transmission is vented for normal operation and in case it heats up.
Welcome to the site amish_electrician.

This is a very straight forward job, a good one to start with if your are new to auto repairs.

While you can do this job using a small pick to remove the "Jiffy tite" wire retainers, there is special tool made for it if you are interested:
Font Metal Wood


When you are done, there are few special steps you will need to do to check the fluid level:
https://forum.chryslerminivan.net/s...built-in-temp-indicator-you-can-make-yourself

A factory set of these lines are cheap from Ebay, no need to mess around trying to repair yours.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/08-18-Chry...639266&hash=item4d8feb506b:g:f80AAOSwLF1YBnSG
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...While you can do this job using a small pick to remove the "Jiffy tite" wire retainers, there is special tool made for it if you are interested:
View attachment 53967
I used a tool like that when I replaced the cooler lines in my 2009, it was Lisle tool #22930.

A factory set of these lines are cheap from Ebay, no need to mess around trying to repair yours. https://www.ebay.com/itm/08-18-Chry...639266&hash=item4d8feb506b:g:f80AAOSwLF1YBnSG
That's what I thought the first time I replaced mine, the second time I cut the old rubber lines off, flared the ends of the steel lines slightly, and clamped on new rubber hoses. That repair has gone leak free longer than either set of OEM lines.
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I just replaced both lincooleres today as they were both leaking at the crimped portion. The lines were surprisingly cheap from the dealer. The hardest part of the job is accessing the ends that are attached at the a/c condenser (the a/c condensers upper section is the transmission cooler). I removed the 2 bolts and 2 plastic pins along the upper grill under the hood and removed the metal brace that runs above the radiator for access to the connectors. The other option would be to remove the grille from the bumper skin but then risk breaking the plastic tabs. Remember to reinstall the c clips first before pushing in the new hoses. Much easier than trying to push them in with the hoses attached. The job took me an hour. Easy.
I have a 2014 T&C with leaking transmission oil cooler lines. As a hobby, this year I started doing a lot of my own auto repairs, so I was thinking of replacing the lines myself. Surprisingly the lines are very accessible and it doesn't look like there's too much to the job. Having never done it though, I wanted to ask those that have... Is there anything specific to watch out for on this job? (Short of replacing any lost fluid) Do these lines need to be bled or anything after replacing them? Or does it not matter if air enters the system? Thanks in advance for any feedback!
If your selling the car cutting and crimping is a good option to save some cash, Myself i would buy New crimped hoses to avoid leaking issues down the road I've never had good luck doing that. I buy all my O.E. parts from https://www.moparpartsgiant.com/ this site can always save me a lot of cash and no need to bleed your lines either but good luck anyway you go with your diy repair.
Make sure the lines are not loose before going any farther.
Make sure the lines are not loose before going any farther.
Loose where? The jiffy tite connections will always swivel as they ride on an O'ring and are only held in with a wire clip.
My shop has good success just replacing the hoses. Use high quality hose and high pressure clamps (not gear type clamps)
Hey Craig, do you have any specifics on the size/type of hose needed? Any clamps that you would recommend?
we use high quality fuel line, and high pressure hose clamps, 2 at each end

clamp - https://www.napacanada.com/en/p/BKB7051227
You can buy transmission cooler hose, I used 3/8" diameter, and I used the high pressure clamps like the ones wcknight suggested.
You can buy transmission cooler hose, I used 3/8" diameter, and I used the high pressure clamps like the ones wcknight suggested.
I assume you cut off "above" the crimped section and then slip the hose onto the resulting steel tubing...? Is it necessary to flare the end of the tubing?
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I assume you cut off "above" the crimped section and then slip the hose onto the resulting steel tubing...? Is it necessary to flare the end of the tubing?
I used a cutoff wheel to slit both sides of the crimps then pried them off. I flared the ends to help keep the hose from being able to slide off, you might be fine without flares but I would use two clamps.

Also be sure to thoroughly clean the lines (inside and out) before you replace them, you don't want to introduce any foreign matter into your transmission.







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Lots of awesome info in the thread so major thanks to all of you.

Last night I was stopped at a light and smoke started coming up in front of the windshield. At first I suspected I was overheating but one quick glance at the temp gauge and then checking the digital readout revealed that all was good.

This made me assume something was leaking onto something hot. Sure enough, a quick glance underneath today revealed red fluid. That said, I’m having a difficult time figuring out where it’s coming from and these lines were my first thought. Power steering reservoir is exactly where the level has always been but I was curious for those of you that had these lines fail, where did you see fluid and was there any smoke during the failure?
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