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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few weeks ago I noticed transmission fluid dripping from the driver's rear corner of the transmission pan. I originally thought it was a trans pan gasket leak. After spraying stuff down with brake clean and watching it for awhile, I confirmed the fluid was coming from one of the trans cooler lines.

I replaced both lines today. The lines I used were Mopar P/N: 0500-5204-AG. The lines are held in place on both the cooler and onto the transmission via easy to remove and reusable clips. David Pike (Youtube Channel: MotorCity Mechanic) has a great Youtube video on how to remove the clips without only a small pick you can find at Harbor Freight for a couple dollars.

The connections on the top of the transmission are very accessible. The lines connected to the cooler require you to loosen the top of the front bumper and move the black metal covering that protects the transmission cooler/AC condenser/radiator. I also had to move the hood latch. Removing everything is pretty straightforward.

SAFETY WARNING: Be sure to disconnect the battery before moving the black metal covering around. It would be very easy to touch the positive battery terminal with the metal covering and a ground - making for a bad day.

The hood latch is held on by two 10mm bolts. I removed them and zip tied the hood latch assembly out of the way.

Underneath the hood, the plastic front bumper covering is fastened to the vehicle by two bolts and two plastic clips. The two bolts and two clips are in the open and easy to remove. This Youtube video shows where the two bolts and clips are located.

The black metal covering is held on by six 10mm bolts. Four of the bolts are easily accessible and the other two are found behind the grill by pulling back the grill/bumper after it has been loosened.

After removing the black metal covering and loosening the front bumper, the trans cooler lines are readily accessible.

Both lines are connected to the trans cooler in a vertical formation. The upper trans cooler line didn't have any transmission fluid drain out after I popped it out of the trans cooler (using the procedure shown in MotorCity Mechanic's video referenced above). The bottom line only had a couple tablespoons drip out when I popped it out of the trans cooler.

Fortunately I didn't need them, but I also placed lots of towels underneath the trans cooler connections. The towels weren't intended to catch fluid, they were there to catch the clips if I dropped them.

The job took me about 90 minutes. I was very deliberate and didn't rush or hurry in any way.
 

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A few weeks ago I noticed transmission fluid dripping from the driver's rear corner of the transmission pan. I originally thought it was a trans pan gasket leak. After spraying stuff down with brake clean and watching it for awhile, I confirmed the fluid was coming from one of the trans cooler lines.

I replaced both lines today. The lines I used were Mopar P/N: 0500-5204-AG. The lines are held in place on both the cooler and onto the transmission via easy to remove and reusable clips. David Pike (Youtube Channel: MotorCity Mechanic) has a great Youtube video on how to remove the clips without only a small pick you can find at Harbor Freight for a couple dollars.

The connections on the top of the transmission are very accessible. The lines connected to the cooler require you to loosen the top of the front bumper and move the black metal covering that protects the transmission cooler/AC condenser/radiator. I also had to move the hood latch. Removing everything is pretty straightforward.

SAFETY WARNING: Be sure to disconnect the battery before moving the black metal covering around. It would be very easy to touch the positive battery terminal with the metal covering and a ground - making for a bad day.

The hood latch is held on by two 10mm bolts. I removed them and zip tied the hood latch assembly out of the way.

Underneath the hood, the plastic front bumper covering is fastened to the vehicle by two bolts and two plastic clips. The two bolts and two clips are in the open and easy to remove. This Youtube video shows where the two bolts and clips are located.

The black metal covering is held on by six 10mm bolts. Four of the bolts are easily accessible and the other two are found behind the grill by pulling back the grill/bumper after it has been loosened.

After removing the black metal covering and loosening the front bumper, the trans cooler lines are readily accessible.

Both lines are connected to the trans cooler in a vertical formation. The upper trans cooler line didn't have any transmission fluid drain out after I popped it out of the trans cooler (using the procedure shown in MotorCity Mechanic's video referenced above). The bottom line only had a couple tablespoons drip out when I popped it out of the trans cooler.

Fortunately I didn't need them, but I also placed lots of towels underneath the trans cooler connections. The towels weren't intended to catch fluid, they were there to catch the clips if I dropped them.

The job took me about 90 minutes. I was very deliberate and didn't rush or hurry in any way.
Nice job. Great tutorial. (y) Motor City Mechanic is great. I've watched several of his videos.
 
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Haha. Noticed about 2 days ago a weird pattern of drops of ATF in the snow just under my front bumper. 4 little dots in a straight line. Not coming from my pan. Not coming from the metal valve body cover or rtv seal. I discovered big drips on the underside of the trans cooler lines. Fluid was dripping on to and saturating the fiber valve body cover then dripping from there. Picked up a Dorman set of lines. Hope to install them this evening.

61332
 
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Got mine installed tonight. I posted a thread. Question for you beretta96...Am I correct in assuming that the fluid through the transmission cooler is non-directional? Can't be guaranteed that I put the lines back on correctly. I got distracted during the job and couldn't recall if the upper rad connection connected to the fore or aft connection on the transmission. The line lengths look correct and the hose positioning looks identical to the old hoses I removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
...Am I correct in assuming that the fluid through the transmission cooler is non-directional? Can't be guaranteed that I put the lines back on correctly....
@06DGC I’m not certain but I wouldn’t guess that’s a safe assumption.

I’m essentially a parts changer. Although I’m working to learn and apply the ‘cause and effect’ aspects of auto engineering, I’m not very far along that path.

If someone hasn’t done so beforehand, I’ll go out to see how the trans cooler lines are oriented and post here to let you know.
 

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Thanks man! That would be great! If you could just let me know, for example, if say the top hose on the rad goes to the back fitting on the trans. If I do have it reverses, it would be a very quick fix. Both lines are very similar in length and shape.
 
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just late to this thread but just noticed some ATF on the line, so just ordered some dorman replacement. Did not notice any puddle under the car but some ATF is on the transmission pan. I will check level to make sure it is safe to drive, since I have not had any transmission symptoms. How much fluid did you have to add after replacing the lines?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I didn’t add any. Primarily because I planned to change my trans fluid shortly thereafter and knew I hadn’t lost a ton of fluid.

I replaced the OEM pan with the Dorman pan that uses a drain plug.

After dropping the OEM pan and with the two other subsequent drains, I poured in exactly whatever amount of trans fluid that was drained - usually ~5.5 quarts.

After each drain/refill, the trans fluid always read as “full” when I checked using the assumed temperature and dipstick levels described by Motor City Mechanic (David Pike) in one of his videos.

If you’d like, I’ll look up at what mileage I replaced the trans cooler lines and let you know how many miles we’ve put on the van since swapping those lines. We’ve traveled quite a bit since swapping those lines - it’ll be quite a few miles.
 

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Thanks , I did change the transmission cooling line yesterday, and thanks to your detailed process and a video from David pike on how to remove the clips holding the lines, I was done in under one hour. Checked the fluid level and it was all good, I probably only lost about 1/4 cup fluid when changing the lines. I had to be quite forceful to remove them but it went well. Used Dorman replacement lines since the Mopar one were over 100 $ at the dealership. As a side note, I had the transmission changed 24000 miles ago at the dealership under warranty. The transmission fluid that leaked when changing the line looks really good.
 
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