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Discussion Starter #1
Garage asked if car had lost power recently. Couldnt even give me 10 day extension. cars auto stop start system failed a few months ago but i ignored it because i dont really care to have it. over the last 2 weeks the remote start hasnt been working. it will beep twice, i see the brake lights come on for a brief second when its about to start, i think the car makes a clicking sound but it doesnt start up. could these issues all be battery related? would these things cause the car to fail inspection? are these things fixable under warranty? the car is a lease and going back in a month and a half and have no interest in spending any money on it. any thoughts??

Thanks
 

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I would think any issues would still be covered under an '18 model's bumper to bumper warranty, unless it has a ton of miles.

Were the failure of remote start and stop/start the reasons it fails inspection? They didn't give you any trouble codes or anything?
 

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My wife went and the only thing the garage asked her was if the car had died recently. Based on everything I've read with regards to a failed Auto stop system, it seems to be battery related. I'm guessing that maybe a low battery could cause a failed inspection?
 

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A low enough battery could have set an engine code and possibly some communication codes with other modules. Depending on what they are looking for during inspection, it's possible it might fail from that.

Can't you ask the garage that tested it why it failed?
 

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A low enough battery could have set an engine code and possibly some communication codes with other modules. Depending on what they are looking for during inspection, it's possible it might fail from that.

Can't you ask the garage that tested it why it failed?
They probably asked if vehicle lost power because they suspect owner is trying to cheat.

By law, they should provide a report if why this vehicle failed inspection, so problem can be fixed.
 

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I believe the issue was that there was no data for the inspection machine to read. That's why he asked if the battery recently died. He said to my wife to drive it on the highway for at least twenty minutes so there would be info on the computer regarding emissions. Im just curious if my symptoms of dead Auto start and not remote starting are signs of a bad battery which in turn could have deleted emissions information thus causing it to fail inspection.
 

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I believe the issue was that there was no data for the inspection machine to read. That's why he asked if the battery recently died. He said to my wife to drive it on the highway for at least twenty minutes so there would be info on the computer regarding emissions. Im just curious if my symptoms of dead Auto start and not remote starting are signs of a bad battery which in turn could have deleted emissions information thus causing it to fail inspection.

In the past, people would disconnect the battery before they take the vehicle for emissions testing so codes would be erased and the vehicle pass the test.

Now, if you disconnect the battery, you need to drive your vehicle for some preset time for the emission tests to complete. If test are not completed by the time you take your vehicle for emissions testing, they will see "not ready".

Most likely they though you are trying to cheat. They usually don't give extensions to cheaters.

We don't like cheaters either.




Take your vehicle to your dealer for inspection, they shall be able to make it pass the inspection or give you an extension until they fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Unfortunately I already paid for the inspection at this place and would have to lose that money if I then took it to the dealer....
 

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Unfortunately I already paid for the inspection at this place and would have to lose that money if I then took it to the dealer....
I don't think so.

Your vehicle's warranty should cover whatever is need to pass inspection, dealer might wave the cost of the inspection, unless battery was disconnected before inspection (dealers don't like cheaters either) 😄

At least try.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I will try. Now I need to find a dealer. I leased the car through a leasing agency and they got the car a bit far from me. Hoping the nearest dealer helps me out.
 

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So, did the shop actually fail your Pacifica, or said to drive it and bring it back again? Do you have a check engine light on?
If not don't worry about it. Just drive it for few days and take it back to the same inspection place.

Also, did you check battery terminals? They might be loose. A weak battery should not reset the emission check codes, but one that has a loose connection might.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I ended up driving around for the day and went to a friend with a shop and it passed right away. All good for now. Next question is whether or not I need to fix the remote start and Auto stop issues not working before returning the lease. Would rather not deal with it.
 

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In the past, people would disconnect the battery before they take the vehicle for emissions testing so codes would be erased and the vehicle pass the test.

Now, if you disconnect the battery, you need to drive your vehicle for some preset time for the emission tests to complete. If test are not completed by the time you take your vehicle for emissions testing, they will see "not ready".
Since OBDII was introduced in 1996, you always had to drive it a certain amount to get rid of "not ready" status after a battery disconnect. I think you mean some jurisdictions' test may have been just a light check, but have smartened up and now do a proper scan.
 

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Since OBDII was introduced in 1996, you always had to drive it a certain amount to get rid of "not ready" status after a battery disconnect. I think you mean some jurisdictions' test may have been just a light check, but have smartened up and now do a proper scan.
In USA, back then most states would not check for monitor readiness. It took several years before a monitor readiness check was mandated. California was the first state to implement it.

Even now, many states doesn't care about it, Texas being one of them. In Texas, just a few counties do an emissions check.

Right where I live, no emissions check is required. As long as no engine light is on, you'll be ok.

Only Texas counties that perform emissions test:

57346
 
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