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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got rid of a 5th gen that had rust at the bottom of the quarter panel, in front of the rear wheel (oddly enough, driver side only, passenger side still rust free).
I am looking to buy a newer 5th gen that hasn't rusted yet and do a thorough preventive program. Questions for those who have been through this:
1. Can you gain access to the area between outer and inner sheetmetal, from the top, by removing interior panels? Anyone have pictures of that area? Can you actually see in there, or at least sneak a borescope in?
2. Is there foam in there?
3. Are there drain holes at the bottom? If not, is there a way to get a drill in there and drill some holes, from the outside or from the inside?
Any other tricks/hints?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I couldn't find any useful info anywhere so I decided to look into it myself. This is the passenger side.

After removing the large quarter interior panel, you see this foam cover directly behind (meaning toward the interior of the van) the dogleg area.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The cover pops out and you see a good size cavity filled with foam. You can easily remove the foam with your bare hand and/or plastic spatula, etc. Plenty room to stick a vacuum hose and clean out the crumbs. This is what the cavity looks like after removing all the foam.
Hole A is the key here. After clearing the foam from this hole, you can stick various objects in there and probe the space beyond the hole (meaning between inner and outer sheetmetal in the dogleg). Unfortunately I found that the space is also filled with foam.
As there is no way to extract the foam from that space, I don't see any way of introducing any rustproofing fluid into that space. Perhaps some cleverer dude can prove me wrong and we can all benefit :)

For spatial reference, Hole B is the hole you see in the rear of the door opening, with a hole plug.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
One thing you can do if you've gotten this far is to spray something into the seam where the inner panel meets the wheelwell. That's what I did here. I suspect this is of very limited benefit.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
LAST RESORT SOLUTION

This is a low-odds solution, but it costs nothing and can't do any harm.

I got a long straw for the Fluid Film aerosol can. You can buy these straws in something like 50" lengths for a couple of bucks and cut them down to whatever size you need. I found I needed it about 20" long. Attach the new straw to a can of FF or your favorite rustproofing aerosol can.
Take the end of the straw and stick it through Hole A in my picture, angled toward the fender lip. Work it a little back and forth. The straw is thin/sharp enough to pierce the foam easily. You will feel it hit the fender lip, about 2-3" in. Spray liberally.

The hope here is that the foam does not fill 100% the cavity between inner and outer sheetmetal and some voids do exist along the edge of the wheel arch. As said, not a high odds solution but basically free and I can't see any other solutions.
 

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Sounds good to me. I have actually pushed or drilled through the foam on the 4th Generations and applied product.

Perhaps just spraying at the top, like Krown does apparently, and letting the product find its way down like condensation does, will eventually find its way to the bottom. I must ask the Krown guy the next time I see him.
 

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I have been tempted to drill a hole up in wheel well and then plug it. Doesn't have to be 1/2" for a wand or straw. Plug could be Christmas tree of blob of silicone sealant or both..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
drill a hole up in wheel well
It's easy to make generic statements. The devil is in the details. As in WHERE to drill the hole(s).
Study it carefully for a while (and remove the quarter trim so you can see behind) and then drill the hole(s) as you propose and post the results. I think you will find reality to be different from what you think.
The size of the hole you drill is irrelevant.
 

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Some members on here, myself included, have removed the paneling inside the vehicle, including speakers, to apply lots of product above the rear wheel wells and beyond.

A hole, if I drilled one for the rear wheel well, would most likely be directly above the axle. The L shaped head at the end of one of my wands, will fit through a 1/4" diameter hole, can then spray in all directions when in there.

Might be a tad unsightly, but a hole could be drilled from the outside, to gain access, better/neater than a rust hole. :)

Actually I don't need to do all that if I used a piece of copper tubing, or steel brake line, on the end of my sprayer, using access through the tail light area.
 
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