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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not going to the dealership. A mechanic I went to found my ABS may need replaced. I did my emissions in my state and passed even with a loud muffler. I've drove fine for a few years with the ABS light going on. I sometimes worry the computer under the tire may go out. As I had thought was the original issue. I don't want to put a anymore 馃 into this van. I'm trying to hold in there till I find something better than a Chrysler. The air bag light is on as well. I'm wondering if it has to do with the tire sensor all of this? Some mechanics look at me like wtf you doing with a Chrysler lol.
 

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Well, it could be worse. How about a popular 2021 Ford F150 with their newish 10 speed automatic transmission? Even the expensive Toyota Sienna has some bad years between 2004 and 2011.
Get things probably checked out as to what is really going on
Every manufacturer has a fix and stockpile of parts to respond to an air bag light. If your horn doesn't work either, look at a clock spring replacement. I have had one air bag related failure (Jeep) that I can ever remember, they are that good.
ABS isn't essential to reliable transportation. A new wheel sensor has fixed the single sole ABS problem I have had since owning 5 Chrysler minivans over tens of thousands of miles. They are that good.
Chryslers have their problems, just like other manufacturers. Your problems seem minor.
What's the year and mileage of your van? Do you keep on top of maintenance?
 

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Your "ABS" probably doesn't need to be replaced. If they mean the ABS controller, that's not the first place to look. Check out the wheel speed sensors first, and the wires going to them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mine is the LX. Two years ago the van completely died. No choice but take it to the dealership then. It needed a new battery and a few other things which was likely just the dealer skirting several bucks from me. After about a year it died again this time it was the computer under the driver tire. Can't think of the name of part right now lol. But a mechanic that owned a newer model of the Chrysler had ordered the computer on eBay and tada it worked like new again. Saved money under $500. The mechanic even offered me not to pay them if part didn't work. It did though.

These vans suck in winter though. These mini vans suck going up roads that have hills or entrances with hills with ice. Never make it up them. With a Chevy truck I could drive on ice with ease.
 

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If the ABS and/or the airbag light is on there will be dtc's (diagnostic trouble codes) set. These codes will greatly assist in determining what the issues are. You will need a higher end handheld scanner to be able to pull the codes from the SRS/airbag and ABS modules. Not certain if auto parts stores will pull codes from the SRS, ABS is possible since they can sell you parts.

My opinion, the ABS issue is a concern but the brakes will still work. The SRS/airbag issue is a major concern. If you are in an accident, one or more of the airbags may not deploy properly putting you or your passengers in harms way.
 

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These vans suck in winter though. These mini vans suck going up roads that have hills or entrances with hills with ice. Never make it up them. With a Chevy truck I could drive on ice with ease.
Unbelievable. My 4WD Jeep does extremely well in snow, but with the lighter back end, can spin out easily on ice. Most vehicles do that to a more or less degree. Ice, by Nature's design, is intended to be very slippery. Is this your truck? :)
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Hood


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My 5 different Chrysler minivans have always done well in Winter with half decent winter tires (more than 50% tread depth left) or even some new all season tires, that had open tread blocks for grabbing the road surface in snow/slush.

Traction = road condition + tire type/condition + # of drive wheels + weight (according to science).

I assume your Chev truck is 4WD and loaded down in the back. That will work. Otherwise there's no comparison. As a general rule, light trucks suck on ice/slippery conditions.
 
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