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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone

I have a question, not sure if it is related to the one of the air blend actuator? But I have this noise coming from the cover of the A/C system blower, located behind the glove compartment
When I start the fan with the control panel, the cover come down and close but the system keeps trying to close it anyway so it does tac,tac,tac … for a while than stop (look at the video)


Is it the actuator on the left side of the blower?
Need to reset (unplug battery)?

My van is:
Dodge Caravan 2010
V6-3.3L
Dual zone

Can’t find any picture about the blower area with instruction in my Haynes book?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was able to solve the issue anyway, I change the actuator = very simple and case close they are all the same on Dodge Caravan 2010 (3.3L)
Purchase mine at RockAuto parts: Air vent actuator

But calibration need to be done after replacement and cannot be done like previous year 2009 and less.
Calibration of 2010 model and up need a scan tool and guest what, only by Dodge Chrysler dealer, I’ve tried a few local garage and none was able to do it …. The money I save by changing the part myself was invest in the $80 / hour super mechanic from Dodge Chrysler ….

If by any luck someone know how to calibrate without the scan tool let me know for future reference

Thanks
Thierry
 

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Old thread but I'm experiencing the same thing. That is, when my recirc air door is in the full fresh air inlet position, the motor actuator stays powered and continues to drive the air door against its seat. And in so doing, it makes that same noise. I gather the gear teeth are loosing engagement because of the excessive force and hopping from tooth to tooth. Eventually, it stops trying, for some unknown reason, and the actuator motor de-energizes. For reasons I don't understand, the problem does not present when the door is against the full recirc seat.

I imagine, that for the recirc air door actuator, the calibration must result in turning off the power to the actuator motor when the air door reaches the full fresh air position seat and. when travelling in the other direction, when the air door reaches the full recirc air position seat. Anybody know how that is achieved?

I've read elsewhere that the actuator drive gear tooth gap must be aligned with a mark on the case. That, if this is done, no calibration is necessary. Any theories out there on this?
 

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Does this actuator have 2 electrical connections or 4+? If it has 4+, it contains a circular resistive sensor with a wiper brush contacting it. This gives feed back to the computer as to it's position. The brush and or circular sensor may be dirty. Clean the contact surfaces.

Another possible fix. Once apart, the position of the output pin/driver in relation to the brush/wiper feedback mechanism can be changed by removing and re-inserting one of the gears. This would be a trial and error procedure. You would have to study the relative positions to understand how it works.

I have worked on a few of these but not this exact one. They can usually be taken apart by partially drilling out some melted plastic pins that travel form one half of the case to the other. Re-assembly by drilling small pilot holes and using self taping screws to hold the case together.

Another guess...with the actuator removed, drive it with the 9 volt batter to a slightly different position and re-install. Again trail and error.
 

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The actuator has two electrical connections. For my 2008 Dodge Caravan, all of the HVAC air doors are driven by the same actuator part number. I copied and pasted the following from an Automotive AC Repair Shop's web site:

Two wire actuators create electrical pulses when the commutator rotates across the brushes of the motor. The HVAC control head, which has pre-programmed logic and actuator end point references, counts the electrical pulses as the motor moves the door through its sweep from one end to the other end.

Kind of makes sense...although I have not been able to confirm that this is how the dodge actuators work.
 

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The actuator has two electrical connections. For my 2008 Dodge Caravan, all of the HVAC air doors are driven by the same actuator part number. I copied and pasted the following from an Automotive AC Repair Shop's web site:

Two wire actuators create electrical pulses when the commutator rotates across the brushes of the motor. The HVAC control head, which has pre-programmed logic and actuator end point references, counts the electrical pulses as the motor moves the door through its sweep from one end to the other end.

Kind of makes sense...although I have not been able to confirm that this is how the dodge actuators work.
Well that makes sense. Ya learn something everyday.
Here's a shot in the dark with this new information. Perhaps conductive dirt between the commutator segments weakens the pulse signal. I've had a few of these apart and noticed the brushes and commutator wear resulting in a commutator that looks dirty and "smeared" for lack of a better word. I was taught years ago, whenever I had a motor apart with a segmented commutator, to clean the commutator and dig out the dirt that fills in between the segments with a fine pick. These actuators have small motors that can be disassembled and the commutators can be cleaned. If you do this, mark/scribe a line on the can of the motor so the lid and can are re-installed in the same position.
Most of these Chrysler actuators use the same motor. If you have another actuator, you may be able to swap motors.

or buy a new actuator.....or ....find out how to perform an actuator calibration.
 

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I did buy a brand new, made in China, Mopar actuator but have not yet installed. When I do and am satisfied that its working to my satisfaction, I'll take apart the old actuator's motor and examine the brushes and commutator. Time for a DC motor review anyway.
A friend, who's car knowledge I have almost 100% faith, said that he thought the motor would just stall and stay energized when the air door is against its seat. That the small motor would not draw enough current for overheating to be a concern. But, he also thought the commutator pulse theory made sense.
Thanks Elvis for your comments.
 

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One means of determining the motor/door position is to pulse the door 1 or more times than necessary to positively set the door position. After that, only the needed pulses are necessary to properly move/set the door. This is typically the process used during calibration.

Another method is detecting the increased current draw when the motor/door hits the end of travel to set the door/motor position. This is how an auto-down window mechanism knows when to cut the power after the window is full down.
 

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I'm having the same problem and have a couple quick questions:

Would letting this go result in any additional damage to parts that would not be replaced? ( E.g the door or it's seat). I'm thinking of waiting until spring and making my son do it, but don't want to create a bigger problem.

How hard is it to get to the actuator? Any guide?
 

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I'm having the same problem and have a couple quick questions:

Would letting this go result in any additional damage to parts that would not be replaced? ( E.g the door or it's seat). I'm thinking of waiting until spring and making my son do it, but don't want to create a bigger problem.

How hard is it to get to the actuator? Any guide?
You won't damage anything by waiting, and as for how hard it is, it's doable within 30 minutes for someone who has no idea what they are doing. The actuator sits in a tight spot but is reachable, held on by 2 T20 bolts.
 

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If it is the recirculation door actuator the door may be stuck in the recirc mode and not allow dry outside air in. This may cause your windows to fog over due to excessive interior moisture. Heat is still there but no means to reduce the moisture.
 

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If it is the recirculation door actuator the door may be stuck in the recirc mode and not allow dry outside air in. This may cause your windows to fog over due to excessive interior moisture. Heat is still there but no means to reduce the moisture.
I don't remember how the recirculation housing works, I think it has a plastic swivel piece which is how the entire unit turns. I imagine those can go bad, yes. Is the AC working? If the ac in your vehicle isn't working this adds to your fogging issue. Anytime you go to defrost mode, even if you press the ac button to be off, the ac stays on to remove moisture from the air. This is also true for floor and defrost mode.
 
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