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Gives new meaning to "pedal pushers" or "people power". :Wow1:
 

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Something's not right about that... reminds me of the HP2G thing.

"It puts out 50 times more effort than you put in." Kinda a wild claim, ain't it?

I call BS. So does the law of Conservation of Energy.
 

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Something's not right about that... reminds me of the HP2G thing.

"It puts out 50 times more effort than you put in." Kinda a wild claim, ain't it?

I call BS. So does the law of Conservation of Energy.
I'm not so sure about that.

I have an 800 watt DC to AC inverter with I attach to my 12v van battery in order to run a 240v 350 watt vacuum pump for 30 minutes. The inverter has a safety cut-out which trips when the input source - my van battery - drops to 10v.

So that's 240v @ 350w for 30 minutes from 2v. If I attach the inverter to a 12v dynamo instead of the battery, it will run for as long as the dynamo is turning.

There are inverters which pump out over 5kw from a 12v DC source - more than enough to power a bike at 50mph.
 

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"It puts out 50 times more effort than you put in." Kinda a wild claim, ain't it?

I call BS. So does the law of Conservation of Energy.
C',mon, what about the 100-MPG carburetor? Or for that matter, the 39 MPG CAFE average we'll have right here in what, 6 years?

Oh wait, that's right, it's an oil industry conspiracy thing; I forgot!

:lol:
 

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I'm not so sure about that.

I have an 800 watt DC to AC inverter with I attach to my 12v van battery in order to run a 240v 350 watt vacuum pump for 30 minutes. The inverter has a safety cut-out which trips when the input source - my van battery - drops to 10v.

So that's 240v @ 350w for 30 minutes from 2v. If I attach the inverter to a 12v dynamo instead of the battery, it will run for as long as the dynamo is turning.

There are inverters which pump out over 5kw from a 12v DC source - more than enough to power a bike at 50mph.
Energy can not be created, nor destroyed. Only transported. Transportation is never 100% efficient.

The average human can not produce more than 150watts pedaling. Olympic cyclists can produce ~200w for 20 mins at 12 mph.

Assuming you're an olympian, and you produce the theoretical maximum of 200w, for 20 mins, you've produced ~ 60Wh...

Put another way, it takes approx 1HP (.75kW to make the most aero-dynamic cars out there (Solar test cars) go 60 MPH. A bike certainly isn't as aerodynamic as a solar car, and Olympic cyclists only produce about 0.125HP.

The math doesn't support it, it's false. There is an external power source, or it's BS.
 

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I'm not so sure about that.

I have an 800 watt DC to AC inverter with I attach to my 12v van battery in order to run a 240v 350 watt vacuum pump for 30 minutes. The inverter has a safety cut-out which trips when the input source - my van battery - drops to 10v.

So that's 240v @ 350w for 30 minutes from 2v. If I attach the inverter to a 12v dynamo instead of the battery, it will run for as long as the dynamo is turning.

There are inverters which pump out over 5kw from a 12v DC source - more than enough to power a bike at 50mph.
Now to actually take care of what you're saying here.

Yes, you can pump out a nearly UNLIMITED amount of watts from ANY voltage source.

But, if you have a 12v source running at 60 amps, you have access to 720watts, or close to 1HP.

If that same 12V source drops to 30 amps, you now only have 360W available.

If you must up your 12V to 24V, you'll halve your amps, so now you have 24V15A, or 360W, or ~0.4HP.

W = V*A

Now, you're running 350W/240V = ~1.5A

5000watts/240V = 20.8A

If you draw 5kW from 12V, you end up with 5kW/12V = 416A.

Think your feet can produce [email protected]?

Said another way, 5000 watts = 6.70511045 horsepower. You can't do it.

In order to correctly visualize this, you have to understand that Amperage is the power, Voltage is the gear ratio, and Watts are the actual drive force.

So if you want to make 60 watts of power at 12V, you need 5 amps.

Inversely, if you apply 10 amps to a 120V circuit, you have the potential for 1200W (about 1.8HP).
 

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What you're forgetting is that the "E-Rocket" does have a battery. You charge it as you cycle along, and the motor discharges it as you need acceleration. Similar to the Prius (with gas generator), just much lighter.
 

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No, I'm not forgetting that.

I'm aware that it has a battery, but the fact is that you can't keep it charged enough for it to not discharge trying to keep you at 50 MPH all the time.

I'm not saying that a human can't go 50 on a bike people do it all the time... I'm saying that you can't go 50, and maintain 50 on this bike.

The numbers don't add up. They just don't.

Even if the bike has a battery that accelerates it to speed, and you keep pedaling normally just to keep the speed (which would still require power, it's not freewheeling to keep a brick in the wind going 50 MPH), you'll eventually wear out, and the battery probably won't be recharged by then, so the next cycle gets shorter, shorter, shorter, etc. You'll eventually have to ride slowly for hours to recharge the (now dead) battery.


Even the max output of to make 200W @ 12V, the current is ~17A not counting losses. It probably takes at least that to keep the bike moving at 50mph, which means there isn't much (if any) energy left to charge the battery at speed.

Keep in mind, also, that the best permanent magnet generators only have ~80% efficiency... and the best bearing/drive systems are only ~95% efficient.

If you're making 200W (theoretical human max) of power, you're pushing it through a generator to charge a battery at 80%... so now only 160W is getting through... then you have the bearing/drive system as well, so now it's only 152W total...

And that's what you're putting out total, to charge the battery and keep the bike moving at 50 MPH.

Lets also remember that the video claims that the bike puts out 50X what you put in... that means that it's putting out 1kW for every 200W you put into it... 1kW at 12V is 83A... That's alot of power, right there.
 
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