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Discussion Starter #1
Got this from the Yahoo! minivan forum.

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/524517/double_your_gas_mileage_2x/

I can appreciate that it would work, but what effect could it have on the engine and fuel system ? Would it 'gum-up' the valves ? Would it damage 'O' rings or eat through fuel lines ? Maybe even more important - will it damage the Catalytic Converter or pump toxic fumes out of the tailpipe ?

If anybody knows the answer, I'll be talking to my contacts in the printing trade - they use acetone in 5 gallon drums.
 

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PT Driver
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Cool now where can you buy Acetone? I'm willing to try because I want to save money where ever I can. :)
 

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Acetone = Snake Oil

I got involved in a debate over this issue a couple of years back on a different board and against my better judgement I decided to test it myself. Why? Because the Acetone booster crowd was so noisy and annoying, zealous even, that if nothing else I decided to do it to shut them up (assuming it didn't work). At the time I had a very consistent commute and was getting a very consistent OBC measurement of fuel economy per tank (almost bang on 22.5 every tank).

The most scientific of the individuals advocating acetone as an additive stated very clearly that it WOULD NOT work as intended on fuel with 10% ethanol, and so as any good pilot running MOGAS would do, I tested the fuel at all of my usual filling stations and came up negative (turns out that New England had no ethanol infrastructure at the time, since remedied).

I then systematically "eased" the fuel system of our 1998 3.8 liter DGC into the acetone regemine and tested a couple of tanks at each level of dilution recommended. The "claims" were that I was gaurenteed to instantly see "at least" a 15% increase in fuel economy (no mere blip on the radar screen) and most likely as much as 35%. Well, sorry to say, my mileage went DOWN by as much as 7.3% (although the average drop was about 6%). I reported my findings every time I filled over about a 2,300 mile test distance before I decided to terminate the test.

When I posted my summary the "scientific" advocate wrote back something like, "Well, I've heard from other folks that the Dodge Caravan doesn't do well with acetone."

Gee thanks. My bet is that no car benefits from the addition of acetone. The fact is that acetone has been tested as a fuel additive for many decades and it has NEVER been scientifically show to be effective at aiding in fuel economy or power delivery, quite to the contrary really.

The above said, I still have about three quarters of a gallon of high quality acetone that I will give away to anybody who wants to try it out themselves.

FWIW, given all of the internet hype a couple of years ago, the show MythBusters did a segment on acetone as a fuel additive and came up with much the same results as I did.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Some say Yay, Some Nay.

Having re-read the arcticle, I noticed the Acetone was tested in fuel rated as 85 - 87 Octane. UK petrol is 95 - 98 Octane, so the higher rated fuel may wipe out any advantage gained by adding Acetone.

Think I'll just stick with the LPG. (LPG = 40p/litre, Petrol = 98p/litre)
 

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1) MythBusters shows it's bunk.
2) People who tout acetone's benefits say it even cured the rod knock they had in the engine (bunk).
3) If it really worked, it'd WOULD be an additive in gasoline. Can you imagine the marketing value if ExxonMobil claimed that you could get 25% better mileage by using their AceGas?
4) If acetone were safe for fuel systems, you'd see it allowed in owner's manuals. Every owner's manual I've read not only suggests that fuel additives will not improve performance, but actually recommends AGAINST using them, going on to claim that any damages from the use of such additives are not warranted.

I'll continue to use straight pump gas.
 

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Some say Yay, Some Nay.

Having re-read the arcticle, I noticed the Acetone was tested in fuel rated as 85 - 87 Octane. UK petrol is 95 - 98 Octane, so the higher rated fuel may wipe out any advantage gained by adding Acetone.

Think I'll just stick with the LPG. (LPG = 40p/litre, Petrol = 98p/litre)
You can look into the archives of both the NACA and ASE and find scientific publications where acetone was used in various amounts for test purposes on the efficacy of using it as a fuel additive. To the best of my knowledge there has never been even a single certified scientific study that has shown acetone in fuel does anything more than REDUCE fuel economy.

If you find one, please enlighten me as I would LOVE to read it. That said, all of the "science" surrounding this issue that I've seen so far is at the very best, junk science and not repeatable in proper lab.

Edit: Octane ratings here in North America do not correlate to octane ratings over in the U.K. and in Europe. IIRC, on your side of the pond y'all use the Research Octane Number (RON), while we use an average of RON plus MON (Motor Octane Number) and we call it the Anti Knock Index (AKI). Typically AKI is usually 4 points below the RON rating that y'all use.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
AKI = 4 points below RON.

That means your 'high' octane is about 91 RON - still way below our 'low' octane at 95.:shakin:
 

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AKI = 4 points below RON.

That means your 'high' octane is about 91 RON - still way below our 'low' octane at 95.:shakin:
I'm not sure of your question. What I meant is that if you were to take the exact same high octane fuel you are able to buy over there and put it in one of our pumps, the proper label would be somewhere between 91 and 92. Same fuel, just different ways of expressing its ability to resist detonation.
 

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Acetone

Gas mileage X2.
Secrets the gas and oil companies don't want you to know.
Standard snake oil pitch.
It's like adding fuel injector cleaner to your gas tank.
Does it do any good? Oil based. Foul your plugs?

To each their own.

Vtech
 

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new member's personal experience with acetone and turpatene

Hi guys, I'm a new member who joined to find out more about fuel modifications for our beloved minivans. I have 1996 and 1999 Plymouth vans. Both are very high mileage: the '96 has 285,000 and still running hard, and the '99 flexfuel has 188,000 and running well. I'm interested in changing the '96 to a small turbodiesel and running biodiesel/veggie oil.

My experience with running acetone and turpatene (a synthetic turpentine) has nothing to do with these vans. I, however, ran turpatene in my '66 Mustang 289 and acetone in my '89 hi-perf Mustang.

The pros: noticeable power increases, especially with turpatene. Turpatene is chemically very similar to the racing octane boosters and power adders that are very pricey to buy. The cons: worse gas mileage; running hot; oil dilution; extreme solvent action; and a blown head gasket on the '66.

I don't remember the ratio of acetone to fuel in my '89. It ran well for a few months, then I started having plug and oil problems, with extreme oil dilution and some soft, leaky gaskets.

The ratio in my '66 was gradually increased until I reached 1 pint per full tank, or about 17 gals, I think. It ran like a scalded cat, albeit a full five degrees hotter, around 218 or so. My 289 was a 9:1 compression motor with a 650 four barrel, mild street torque cam, headers, and a 3.7? something rear end. My thinking was, this is really good, what could a 1/2 pint more hurt? Wow, 2 pints is even better! I blew a head gasket on a 100 degree day and the car spent six months in the driveway while I surreptiously rebuilt the top end. Nosy neighbors and a storm trooper "no car work" clause caused me no end of grief.

Be very, very careful with this stuff. Both are corrosive, water-loving, very solvent (absolutely loves certain gaskets and o-rings), and has a low flash point. Leaving a tin of turpatene in your trunk on a very hot day might find your car burning merrily. If either catch fire, you can barely see the flames. I won't use either anymore.

Just my 2 cents. Jim
 

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I did some research and also did some testing with my 99 Dodge Caravan with 3.3 L. I ran acetone in two tanks of gasoline. I was averaging 18.6 overall mpg, I added 3 ounces for 20 gallons of gas (just regular 87 octane). My mileage did go up to 19.9 mpg. Of course I also do not carry a spare tire or Jack. My van is a wheelchair conversion so there is extra weight, actually quite a bit. Now for the down side they do say acetone will eat up rubber, i.e. all fuel lines, rings and I would imagine possibly even your fuel cell after prolonged use. I do know you cannot store it in anything plastic and it does damage plastic bottles funnels. I would say it would need to be tested over a prolonged period to see what damages if any would occur, I'm not willing to do that! On the other side this is definitely something I would not expect the gas companies to use even if it did work, why would they want us to get better gas mileage and use less of their product? The automakers could not back this because simply the liability issue of just getting it on your paint. Trust me if you get it on the paint you're going to have a bare metal spot.
 

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I did some research and also did some testing with my 99 Dodge Caravan with 3.3 L. I ran acetone in two tanks of gasoline. I was averaging 18.6 overall mpg, I added 3 ounces for 20 gallons of gas (just regular 87 octane). My mileage did go up to 19.9 mpg. Of course I also do not carry a spare tire or Jack. My van is a wheelchair conversion so there is extra weight, actually quite a bit. Now for the down side they do say acetone will eat up rubber, i.e. all fuel lines, rings and I would imagine possibly even your fuel cell after prolonged use. I do know you cannot store it in anything plastic and it does damage plastic bottles funnels. I would say it would need to be tested over a prolonged period to see what damages if any would occur, I'm not willing to do that! On the other side this is definitely something I would not expect the gas companies to use even if it did work, why would they want us to get better gas mileage and use less of their product? The automakers could not back this because simply the liability issue of just getting it on your paint. Trust me if you get it on the paint you're going to have a bare metal spot.
Sorry, your anecdotal test is no indication that acetone does anything for fuel economy (except maybe drop it). Acetone has been tested as a fuel additive since at least the 1930s, and in every published scientific test for the last seventy to eighty years, acetone has reduced the brake specific horsepower ratings of every engine it's been used in.

Long story short, if the mileage runs you did with acetone in your tank had been run with straight gasoline, you would probably have gotten even better mileage.
 

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What Jason said a while ago. If it worked, it would already be an additive.

It's just like the claims any of any other "mileage booster". Think about it:wouldn't such a 'find' be valuable to a fuel or car company? Look at the dollars flying around lately to increase mileage... such as designing whole new fleets of hybrid cars? (Gee, Chrysler, didn't you know all you had to do was load up on ACETONE?)

And even if it did work in the area of improving mileage, the dark side is apparently reduced life of seals, gaskets, etc. Add up those repairs and see if you would rather have just paid for the "Extra" gasoline.
 

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I tried acitone a decade ago with no results measurable.

I tried it again a year or so ago when I got desperate (10% ethanol hit me for 15% to 25% LOSS in fuel economy)

The acetone worked !! I got almost all my MPG back.

Then it stopped working. Then it worked. They I discovered it was not working at all that I was just getting gas from different stations and it "worked" at the stations that were NOT yet using ethanol.

Once we went all ethanol around here it stopped having any effect IE it never worked. I never saw a loss in economy but any gain was small enough to be ignored as math/fill error margin. Its a pity its so cheap (walmart paint stripper isle)
 
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