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Hi all,
A little over a year ago, I noticed the headliner in my 2001 Chrysler Town & Country was sagging a bit over the driver seat. I'm disabled and cannot fix it myself otherwise I would've taken care of it right away. I asked a couple of friends to help fix it but they were always too busy. Anyway, now almost the entire headliner is sagging and looks like it's separated from the vent that's over the passenger side sliding door. I see there are quite a few adhesives on the market to repair headliners, is there one y'all would recommend? To apply the adhesives, does the foam backing have to be removed from the van first? Any idea on how much it would cost to have it repaired professionally, to be brought back to as newish looking as possible?

Thanks in advance for any info!
 

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Nothing works, replace it.

Those ugly things are, well, very ugly.

56446


I wouldn't use them, and to be honest, I don't believe anyone on his right mind will use them.
 

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I think those are a great idea, and better than the upholstery tacks that I have been using.

Anyway, eyes on the road and not on the headliner!
 

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Levy is right. There is no "repairing" the headliner material; it must be replaced. The headliner material itself is foam-backed cloth. Time and temperature eventually cause the foam to disintegrate, leaving the cloth sagging and flapping in the breeze.

To correctly repair, the headliner must be removed and all traces of old cloth, foam, and adhesive have to be cleaned from the headliner board. Many use a stiff brush and a shop vac for this. New headliner material (available at almost any fabric store) is then glued to the board with spray adhesive and all wrinkles are smoothed away. A bit of trimming and marking of holes and it's ready to reinstall.

There are a few You Tube videos on how to remove the headliner board. It is not at all difficult, just a bit time consuming and somewhat clumsy. The board is slightly larger than 4 x 8 once removed.

I removed my headliner board a few years ago in my SWB Caravan. Took about an hour with a second set of hands to help. A local upholsterer did the cleaning and applied the new fabric (I changed the color to dark charcoal from light grey). Cost $125.00. Re-installation took another hour.

Before handling the R&R myself, I received quotes in the neighborhood of $300.00 for a shop to do the whole thing. Was definitely worth my time to do the work myself.

Pins, clips, etc. are nothing but band-aids
 

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Mine were on for over 6 years, with no problems. Again, I wouldn't spend $300 on a cosmetic repair on a 15 year old van. I would use that money on new headlights, however.

Eyes on the road, and don't look up!
 

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My headliner is starting to sag right at the front (top of the windshield), and my plan is to keep my eyes off the headliner until the headliner can't keep off my eyes!
 

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My headliner is starting to sag right at the front (top of the windshield), and my plan is to keep my eyes off the headliner until the headliner can't keep off my eyes!
if its just a small part you can use a spray adhesive or hair spray to keep it up, be gentile and don't tug on it
 

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$225 at a shop outside New Bern, NC, about 3 years ago. Complete.

When pricing the job, it was an additional $75 if the vehicle had rear A/C vents.

Member ItsAllGood did a write up instruction w/ pictures about the complete job and an online source for all the materials.
I don't know how to link it on this new forum... Or even find it for that matter.
One day i'll learn the new environment, here.
 

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I have also seen little clear buttons with a little wire corkscrew that would look better than the pictured ones above.
I suppose they are specifically for this purpose, headliner secure.

Upholstery "twist pins" at Walmart $7

I'm with Levy on this though, life is so much better having just done it right.

If you do it though, what will almost make it acceptable, is to measure and install them even and neatly. Random installation will make your van look so devalued and shabby.
déclassé
 

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$225 at a shop outside New Bern, NC, about 3 years ago. Complete.

When pricing the job, it was an additional $75 if the vehicle had rear A/C vents.

Member ItsAllGood did a write up instruction w/ pictures about the complete job and an online source for all the materials.
I don't know how to link it on this new forum... Or even find it for that matter.
One day i'll learn the new environment, here.
Here? https://www.chryslerminivan.net/threads/headliner-coming-undone.169777/#post-1694853
 

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If Levy is right, then I'm moving to Mexico!

What I don't understand is that this headliner problem has been with us for many years, as my '81 Chevy Caprice had the same issue. Why, Oh why, are they still using the same type of fabric, is a question as old as Jeepman! Note, I'm 73, and am I the oldest forum member?

Better yet, why are they still using plastic headlight lenses that get cataracts (cloud up). Of note, we could actually go back to glass and eliminate the problem.

Will all the old guys please stand up!
 

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Why, Oh why, are they still using the same type of fabric, is a question as old as Jeepman! Note, I'm 73, and am I the oldest forum member?

Better yet, why are they still using plastic headlight lenses that get cataracts (cloud up). Of note, we could actually go back to glass and eliminate the problem.

Will all the old guys please stand up!
I'm 53 going on 70. I'd stand, but my hips are breaking...

The foam backed cloth for the headliners, it is used because it hides imperfections in the board and the installation, and I suppose as insulation to a point.

I floated an idea about ozone causing the deterioration. A detailer may use an ozone generator to remediate odors, such as smoking inside the vehicle. I wondered if cars that had been subjected to the ozone treatment, perhaps purchased from a used car lot, would drop their headliners sooner than a vehicle that was original owner.
 

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If Levy is right, then I'm moving to Mexico!

What I don't understand is that this headliner problem has been with us for many years, as my '81 Chevy Caprice had the same issue. Why, Oh why, are they still using the same type of fabric, is a question as old as Jeepman! Note, I'm 73, and am I the oldest forum member?

Better yet, why are they still using plastic headlight lenses that get cataracts (cloud up). Of note, we could actually go back to glass and eliminate the problem.

Will all the old guys please stand up!
Hey Junior, 73, I wish, broke my hip joint downhill skiing 2 days before my 75th birthday. With a pin, rod, some screws and a couple of windings of wire, I was mended up. No hip replacement required. I was back skiing this past season. Skiing too fast, so they keep telling me. How are you suppose to slow those things down? ;)
 

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I would use the screw-ins. If done nice, it might look like an upgrade. But, my wife is fussy and said "don't touch it", but I didn't like it touching my hair and would only get worse. You can't re-attach it since the foam is degraded. While my wife was out of the country, I replaced it in our 2002 T&C. It has rear climate so many components and wiring in the headliner. I had previously done the one in our 1996 Voyager, which was a basic van. I was surprised to find the wiring harnesses all over glued to the headliner, and there is no main connect, just a wiring bundle up from the floor on one side. Do not cut that. I disconnected each termination and pulled all the wiring off. A little tricky to work the headliner out (and back in) without bending it too much. Once out, you can scrape off all the remaining gooey foam, clean (alcohol & maybe acetone, forget), then glue new material back. I found it at Joan's Fabrics much cheaper than ebay (maybe $25). You will need 2 cans of spray adhesive if a full-size van. Buy the good "for headliners" adhesive which is pricey ($12/can or more, forget) and follow the instructions perfectly. You get one chance to stick the fabric, so need helping hands. Work it into the deep concave sections (above front seats) first so it won't be too tight there. Even then, it might later separate there, as mine did (touch-up glue).

In my 1996, the headliner body was a bit degraded at the edges, so I got the bright idea to cover it with woven fiberglass-epoxy (like a boat). Even though I have done fiberglass before, that proved very tedious since it wouldn't lie flat in the curves. Perhaps if you used mat instead it would sit better. I had to cut-out raised areas. You also must do in many passes since little time before the epoxy sets, and I was doing this in the winter and refrigerated the epoxy and hardener first, but still ~5 min working time. I went cheap and used light brown sheet from a thrift store. It was hard to find one long enough for this basic van, so unlikely for a long wheel-base van. The cloth actually looks nice, not as good as the factory foam, but I don't have to worry about foam degrading later (it gets to 115 F here). Fairly thin cloth, but soft w/ slight fuzz, stretchy yet strong, so worked in the concave areas without wrinkles. Only one wrinkle where my teenage helper was a bit careless lowering it down and no re-do's possible w/ the spray adhesive. I recall the sheet is cotton w/ a high thread count.
 
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