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Personal experience with brake pads.
Original (1990's vintage) Performance Friction Carbon Metallic pads - great stuff. Loved them on my '91 SHO. Switched to EBC RedStuff after trying the latest PFCM pads and they didn't stop well.
Current version PFCM - based on the old 'Z' pads, these are not as grabby at low temperatures, but provide smooth brake response on the GC.
Bosch pads (front) - Performs adequately, but still unable to avoid a deer that I had plenty of time otherwise to miss.
Wagner Thermo-Quiet - Have them on the rears, same pads as front of my '01 Stratus ES Sedan. Terrible on Stratus, just slightly better than OEM on rear of GC.
Green Stuffs on '01 Stratus - After break-in, they were about the same as the OEM (Not Value Pads).
Napa Adaptive (Dual material pads) on Stratus were about the same as Wagners for performance and wore quickly.

So, if I get my 301 code fixed, I need to buy brakes all around. Suspension is solid.
Trying to decide between EBC YellowStuffs all around, if they make them for the rear, or Redstuffs which should be slightly better than OEM.
Read https://forum.chryslerminivan.net/showthread.php/76313-SLH-(-kind-of)-Brake-upgrade/ for more detail
In the end:
Slotted rotors seem to be necessary.
SS lines - The GC does have the originals on it!
Never heard of Akebono pads - Anyone else compare them to EBC or PFCM?
And no, I can never get the GC to trigger the ABS either with the 16" Michelin Defenders or 15" Blizzak in the dry with an empty van. With that deer incident, the family was in it along with our shopping, which of course adds considerable weight.

Are there ways to tweak the proportioning valve? Or, change it so it takes advantage of the ABS better?
Just trying for ideas.
 

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Been using the Power Stop pad and drilled/slotted rotor sets. Not necessarily the most grip/performance in the world; however, at least they don't generate a mess like some of the other brake pads I've used. Funny thing is the rear cross-drilled rotors cause an odd cyclical "clicking" sound on braking... sorta like having cards in your bicycle spokes when you were a kid. Believe it's caused by heating of the air in the drill holes as they pass between the pads. While between the pads, the holes are closed and the air expands due to heating... generating pressure that is then relieved when the hole exits the pads. This doesn't happen up front because the front rotors are two metal layers/plates with hollow between so the air is not trapped up front like it is in the single layer/plate rear rotor.

Regardless of which pads you use, I think the smartest thing you can do during a brake servicing is replace the rubber "slide boots" on the caliper at each servicing, clean/polish/replace the slide pins as necessary, and lube up properly with a silicone product such a Sil-Glyde. Fancier lubes can swell the rubber and dirty slides keep you from getting maximum stopping power due to binding. Binding also promotes un-even wear of your pads so you find yourself servicing your brakes more often than you should have to. That's one reason I like the power stop kits. They've got everything you need, except for a proper "daily driver" lube. They do come with a fancier high-performance lube, usually a ceramic blend or something; however, I just chuck that crap. Unless you're racing your van and really generating a lot of heat then that high-tech lube is simply more trouble than good. Racing folks service their brakes much more often so it's OK for them as the hardware gets changed out much more often; however, for your daily driver just recommend sticking with the simple and proven silicone only lubricants.
 

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fix it if you can
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Personal experience with brake pads.
...
Are there ways to tweak the proportioning valve? Or, change it so it takes advantage of the ABS better?
Just trying for ideas.
If your van has proportioning valve, it does not have ABS and rears are plain drums...
If it has ABS, there's no proportioning valve - ABS valve body takes care of it all.

FWIW, anything drilled or slotted is a rust trap in our 'rust belt'. I have to do brakes every 2-3 years because the rotors start to rot (corrode away), the pads usually have between 60-80% left (but pad life would depend on driving 'style'...)
P.E.:
that out of the way, In the fall (~November) I put on a set of Raybestos coated rotors and hybrid pads up front (I knew it wouldn't pass inspection in the spring with old rotors doing another 4months in the bryne). Nothing fancy, the 'daily driver' type china made rotors - driver's side is close to rust free, passenger side is getting light coating in the cooling 'veins' (after just one winter season).

Just last week I had to do the rears - one of the Centric 'premium' semi-metallic pads decided to shed the friction material at ~65% material left... I put on another set of coated rotors from the same company and another set of 'hybrid' pads. ($17.37 per rotor and $13.81 for pads, thanks to RockAuto) Did the parking brakes (take apart, clean, lube, reassemble) and most importantly bled the rears again (after changing the fluid in reservoir) - the whole system was bled in the fall.

Took it for a test on a rural 2 lane, after couple 'bed in' runs, accelerate to 50 and slam on the brakes to test - van was empty, instant response with ABS kicking in from 30 to 0 and visible tire marks on the dry pavement - no gaps in the marks, solid tread lines, so ABS was just relieving wheels that were starting to slip. This is on '05 Limited with all the "bells and lead weights" for convenience and Firestone Precision Touring (nearly new - 1st rotation of rears to the front).
 

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Personal experience with brake pads.
Original (1990's vintage) Performance Friction Carbon Metallic pads - great stuff. Loved them on my '91 SHO. Switched to EBC RedStuff after trying the latest PFCM pads and they didn't stop well.
Current version PFCM - based on the old 'Z' pads, these are not as grabby at low temperatures, but provide smooth brake response on the GC.
Bosch pads (front) - Performs adequately, but still unable to avoid a deer that I had plenty of time otherwise to miss.
Wagner Thermo-Quiet - Have them on the rears, same pads as front of my '01 Stratus ES Sedan. Terrible on Stratus, just slightly better than OEM on rear of GC.
Green Stuffs on '01 Stratus - After break-in, they were about the same as the OEM (Not Value Pads).
Napa Adaptive (Dual material pads) on Stratus were about the same as Wagners for performance and wore quickly.

So, if I get my 301 code fixed, I need to buy brakes all around. Suspension is solid.
Trying to decide between EBC YellowStuffs all around, if they make them for the rear, or Redstuffs which should be slightly better than OEM.
Read https://forum.chryslerminivan.net/showthread.php/76313-SLH-(-kind-of)-Brake-upgrade/ for more detail
In the end:
Slotted rotors seem to be necessary.
SS lines - The GC does have the originals on it!
Never heard of Akebono pads - Anyone else compare them to EBC or PFCM?
And no, I can never get the GC to trigger the ABS either with the 16" Michelin Defenders or 15" Blizzak in the dry with an empty van. With that deer incident, the family was in it along with our shopping, which of course adds considerable weight.

Are there ways to tweak the proportioning valve? Or, change it so it takes advantage of the ABS better?
Just trying for ideas.
Like Atoman stated, keeping those guides from binding makes a huge difference. I tend to check mine much more often than the average driver. WHY? brake drag often lessens MPG and the pads wear faster.

Keep it all clean and no rusty rusty stuff either.
 

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3rd gen > all others
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Akebono actually makes the pads for OEM, so they are what you would get from the dealer.

My 2000 T&C has rear drums and ABS, but no proportioning valve. It looks like that aluminum junction block back there is just an "orifice block" designed to limit fluid flow to the rear in order to actuate the front brakes first. Maybe they were different on 4th gen? If not, you could experiment with an extra block by drilling out the orifaces slightly bigger.

Rotors - I don't believe in the slotted/drilled stuff for our application. It takes away mass and friction area on an already undersized rotor. The rears are solid, unvented rotors so should NOT be drilled or even need slots. On the van I have typical OE rotors in good shape. I have Satisfied G6 Carbon Ceramic front pads that are 7 years old and maybe half worn down? Stops good when the rotors are clean (no flash rust). On other cars I have used the Duralast coated rotors, which is nothing more than a fancy paint. They WILL start to rust after one winter (as our rear Sienna rotors are). We had a Dodge Magnum R/T that I used the Centric PLATED rotors on, and those DID stay clean through a couple of winters, and still looked good when we sold it. I'll be going with those rotors again in the future. So coated = bad, plated = good.

If you don't mind a little extra pedal travel but want more clamping force, you could swap a 3rd gen brake master cylinder in. My 2000 kept the master cylinder, but I swapped 4th gen front suspension and brakes (from the 4 disc setup with the larger front caliper pistons) onto it, and kept the rear drum brakes. The pedal does travel farther, but it stops SO much better and can still fit 15" wheels or larger over it. For the first time I was able to get the front tires to chirp during a hard stop! A good safety improvement. So because of that, I've wondered if the 3rd gen master cylinder could handle the 4 disc setup of a 4th gen van.

For replacement hard brake line, use Nicop (a nickel/copper alloy that won't rust). Easy to work with and will stay clean. You can buy it by the 25 foot roll.

Other than that, the caliper slides have been covered by others. I use synthetic high-temp brake grease on them and the pad ears, and file the pad ears to slide in the brackets/holders upon installation. Keep your parking brake cleaned and lubed (the pivot arm on the backing plate likes to rust up and stick) and the brakes will be reliable.
 

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Akebono actually makes the pads for OEM, so they are what you would get from the dealer.
Not necessarily, part manufacturers have contracts with vehicle manufacturers, they often can not sell the very same part to others. Vehicle manufacturers often provide the specs of what they need. Parts manufacturers cannot fabricate same part for others during certain number of years. They have to change something, it can be for the worst but it can also be of better quality.
 

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Tires are very important, and once they start to slip and the ABS kicks in, your stops will take longer.

Slotted and drilled rotors are good if you're racing or doing heavy towing in the mountains, as they dissipate heat better.

Racing pads work well once they warm up, which is why race cars do warm up laps before the race starts.

OEM, or equivalent pads, are probably best for the average motorist. That said, I used and was happy with Akebono ceramic pads front and rear. I also used plain jane Centric rotors without a problem.
 

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I’ve had very good luck with Centric premium rotors (plain, slotted, cryo, or some combo). They are a heavy, high carbon high strength iron (G3000 composition or something, don’t quote me, this is off the top of my head). I think that’s the way to go for max heat absorption and resisting warpage. Most customers are very happy with their Posi-Quiet line of brake pads. I use the fleet or StopTech for those that want performance pads. Centric website has good info.
I would also look at Hawk or anybody else using that G3000 composition rotor like centric premium.
I only use moly lubes for brakes. Nothing else is still there by the time the brake pads aren’t anymore.
Note: I’m in the SW USA. We have lots of heat and no snow/rust.
 
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