The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a clunking in the front suspension of my ‘05 T&C. It is as I go over bumps and as I turned the wheels. Replacing the upper mounts fixed the steering clunk, as expected, but not the bump clunk. I had my son wiggle the steering wheel as I was underneath, and I found play where the left inner tie rod is, although it was hard to be precise with boot in place. Replacing the inner tie rod had no effect on the clunk. Because when I bought this van last fall, it came with two inner tie rod ends, I’m gonna replace the second one this morning with no expectation of improvement, then set the toe-in to spec. It needed aligning anyway as the steering wheel is at an angle when driving straight. The sway bar links were recently replaced.

Thoughts about the source of the clunking? Can struts with new mounts clunk?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,630 Posts
Just for fun, lubricate the sway bar bushings with some type of runny silicone lubricant, or just for a test, WD40 will work. But as the lubricant needs to run into the bushing, you'll need to wait a few hours. You can always loosen the bushing and spray away.

I once had these bushing making so much noise, I thought the suspension was falling apart.
 

·
3rd gen > all others
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Check all the nuts on the sway bar end links. They can get loose while "breaking in" and cause a clunk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Went through it all with my 2005. The clunking lasted for years. Replaced struts, end links (OEM and Moog greaseable), bushings (sleeved and non-sleeved), inner and outer ends...and still had the clunking! In July of 2017 I took a chance on the Dorman sway bar bracket & bushing kit (p/n 928-306). Quiet as a mouse since. Best $25.00 ever spent on this van!
57323
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,871 Posts
Check all the nuts on the sway bar end links. They can get loose while "breaking in" and cause a clunk.
Road Ripper is right. The sway bar link nuts back off, especially if not tighnened up properly. Clunking is a good description for the sound.

The stud has to be totally static while the nut is torqued to spec.

Keep in mind that there is a twisting force on that connection, to the strut body, as wheels get turned i.e. the strut rotates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have a clunking in the front suspension of my ‘05 T&C. It is as I go over bumps and as I turned the wheels. Replacing the upper mounts fixed the steering clunk, as expected, but not the bump clunk. I had my son wiggle the steering wheel as I was underneath, and I found play where the left inner tie rod is, although it was hard to be precise with boot in place. Replacing the inner tie rod had no effect on the clunk. Because when I bought this van last fall, it came with two inner tie rod ends, I’m gonna replace the second one this morning with no expectation of improvement, then set the toe-in to spec. It needed aligning anyway as the steering wheel is at an angle when driving straight. The sway bar links were recently replaced.

Thoughts about the source of the clunking? Can struts with new mounts clunk?
The front stabilizer bar has two bushings one on the passenger side and one on the drivers side. These need to be replaced. I’ve done mine twice on my 2004 grand caravan.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,871 Posts
The front stabilizer bar has two bushings one on the passenger side and one on the drivers side. These need to be replaced. I’ve done mine twice on my 2004 grand caravan.
Yes, the sway bar bushings can loosen up or wear to the point of severe noises like squeaks, clicking noises, or clunks. Chrysler has tried some redesigns of the bushings over the years but none of those redesigns have been 100% effective. The bushing appears to be too small for the amount of twisting it's expected to take. New brackets may make a difference.

Chrysler redesigns include a hard bushing, designed to slip, a bushing with a fabric insert vulcanized in to grab the sway bar to prevent slippage, and a bushing with a nylon insert.

MOOG has a regular black bushing, a blue "Problem Solver" bushing, and a fat bushing with nylon insert to try to address the problem.

Although the system was designed for the bushing to grab the sway bar (compression bonding), lubricating the bushing, so it can easily slip, sometimes solves the noise problem for awhile.

However, If the clunking noise didn't exist before the strut replacement, but appeared after, then the end link connection to the strut is the likely problem, rather than the bushing. Some connections have a habit of loosening up due to twisting forces, this is one of them.

Sheldon's experience with noisy sway bar bushings. Shop said it was the struts. :)
Fluid Film to the rescue:

Various sway bar bushing designs: Sway Bar Bushing Replacement
1. STABILIZER BAR WITH CONVENTIONAL BUSHING Note: Bar is loose within the bushing, decreasing the effectiveness of the bar.
Also, the roll stiffness of the stabilizer bar with the conventional bushing is 17.7 N/ mm.
2. STABILIZER BAR WITH GRIPPY FLAT BUSHING Note: Flat surfaces on bar and bushing to create grip. Causes stress concentrations.
3. STABILIZER BAR WITH UPSET RING
4. STABILIZER BAR WITH CHEMICALLY BONDED BUSHING
5. STABILIZER BAR WITH COMPRESSIVELY BONDED BUSHING Note: That appears to be what we have.
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'll pick up a pair of bushings and give them a try. The sway bar end links couldn't be rattled or turned easily by hand when I checked them when first replacing the strut mounts, then replacing the inner tie rod ends. I'll let you know the results. I'm gonna pick up these: MEVOTECH Sway Bar Frame Bushing
I see no need to replace the mounting brackets, and the bushing-only kit is available just down the street from me.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,871 Posts
I'll pick up a pair of bushings and give them a try. The sway bar end links couldn't be rattled or turned easily by hand when I checked them when first replacing the strut mounts, then replacing the inner tie rod ends. I'll let you know the results. I'm gonna pick up these: MEVOTECH Sway Bar Frame Bushing
I see no need to replace the mounting brackets, and the bushing-only kit is available just down the street from me.
Mevotech Blue could be MOOG blue problem solver bushings. May want to hang onto your old bushings. Mopar and MOOG both sell bushings with a nylon insert. Should work better but may still need new brackets to keep hem tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I ended up getting NAPA’s blue bushings. The ones I took out were blue Moogs. When doing this, I had another look at the sway bar links, and one of them had a lower ball joint which I could rattle a bit with my hand, although the nut was tight, so I’ll be replacing it sometime. The sway bar bushings eliminated the worst of the clunking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,630 Posts
Was the bar rusty under the bushing?

Of note, I don't think the bushings are designed to stop twisting. They are designed to prevent up/down and front/back movement of the sway bar.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,871 Posts
Was the bar rusty under the bushing?

Of note, I don't think the bushings are designed to stop twisting. They are designed to prevent up/down and front/back movement of the sway bar.
No lubricant comes with, or is made for, those sway bar bushings except for the polyurethane type made by Energy Suspension, for example. Lubricant s included per:

The Parts Department at Mopar say "Use no lubricant".

The closest Mopar has come to using a lubricant is, for a short time, the insert bushings had a paste (lubricant?) between the insert and the black bushing. That didn't last long, neither did the bushings.

It's a "compression bonding" design, not a "slip" design. "Compression bond" design absorbs more energy in the bushing for a more controlled/dampened suspension.

Problem with the bushings is size of bushing (too small) versus the suspension travel (too large), especially after parts are worn. New brackets should help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Was the bar rusty under the bushing?

Of note, I don't think the bushings are designed to stop twisting. They are designed to prevent up/down and front/back movement of the sway bar.
The bar was perhaps less rusty under the bushing. There was certainly no necking down effect due to rust. Where bar end's bend starts under the bushing, the bar was slightly polished by the bushing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Well after almost a year I finally found the root cause for my clunk over bumps. After replacing dam near the whole front suspension turns out it was indeed the sway bar bushings.

It was only on the right side I replaced both . I used Moog problem solvers . Now the one on the left was already replaced which is why it was quite. Part# K200220 the blue ones . And they solved the problem . And they were under $20.00 to boot.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top