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Folks: I've blown the head gasket(s?) in my 2001 Town & Country 3.8L v6. Might anyone have a step-by-step guide for replacing it/them? I'm reasonably adept with a wrench, but haven't tackled a job like this before, so any guidance I can find would be much appreciated. DugIn
 

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Hello and welcome to the forums. How do you know the head gaskets are leaking? What test was performed? Here is a video as to how its done. It doesn't look to hard, just a lot of stuff to remove.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rv0q1-ri9Ug
 

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Would like to know hiw you came to the conclusion that the head gaskets are blown.
Before you install anything, pull the lifters one by one and look at the rollers and the cam lobes for excessive ware
Worst part is the exhaust manifolds going back on. Get new bolts for the crossover tube and catalytic converter, and an extra exhaust manifold gasket.
If heads are ok, go ahead and change the valve stem seals while you have the heads off.
 

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If the front head, access is much easier. If the rear, remove the wiper tray and get used to laying over the front. It is about the same as any Mopar pushrod engine back to the 1960's, just more sensors and wires to get out of the way. Unlike those older engines, you must remove the heads to replace the lifters, so leave time to inspect and replace those while you can, and probably the camshaft too. The later slant six engines (~1978) were the same deal. But, I agree with doing diagnostics first. If you don't see brown slimy oil mousse floating in the radiator coolant, it is unlikely the head gasket has failed. Compression and leak-down tests will tell you. You must know ahead of time since you might need to do a re-ring job while in there. Too many people pull a head first, see nothing wrong then don't know what is the problem, and then too late for a compression test.
 

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Well, the oil is frothy, the coolant doesn't stay at level and the "oil" level increases corresponding to coolant refills, and the temperature gauge goes into the red. Pretty sure that's what I'm dealing with. Yes, a big job, but somebody has to do it! ;) Thank you for the reply - I appreciate it. DugIn
 

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I just wanted to make sure it's the heads and not the timing chain cover which can also allow coolant to leak in to the oil. Both are not fun, but the cover is faster to do than the heads.
Suggest the block test sniffer that checks for hydrocarbon in the coolant system to help you deside heads or covers.
 

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Is a "block test sniffer" something one could borrow from O'Reilly or AutoZone or the like? This isn't a piece of equipment that I'm familiar with. Thanks again.
 

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In your case, this test is "Not Needed"!
Wow, the first psychic auto diagnostic?

An example: Napa item BK7001006
Leak Detector Kit / Engine Block Test Tools Inc.
Google shows others.
Suggesting since you did not menation swollen hoses, and if overheating is constantly hot or cycles, and have seen more timing cover leaks than head gaskets.
 

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Wow, the first psychic auto diagnostic?

An example: Napa item BK7001006
Leak Detector Kit / Engine Block Test Tools Inc.
Google shows others.
Suggesting since you did not menation swollen hoses, and if overheating is constantly hot or cycles, and have seen more timing cover leaks than head gaskets.
Since O.P. stated that he sees water in oil, oil level increases according to added coolant, it would be very easy to tell if blown gasket is the problem:

Well, the oil is frothy, the coolant doesn't stay at level and the "oil" level increases corresponding to coolant refills, and the temperature gauge goes into the red
Remove radiator cap, add coolant all the way to the top, start engine. If coolant start pouring out of the radiator, then you know you have a blown head gasket. If not, look down the radiator neck, if you see air bubbles coming out, then you hav a blown head gasket.

If none of above, then look somewhere else.

A "block test sniffer" would be useful on very small leaks but, on a leak this big, it is "Not Needed"
 

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Timing cover leak can also fill/ increase the oil level.
 

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But the combo will foam in the lower end, and he indicates the oil is foamy, but does not mention in the radiator which really makes it impossible to diagnose over the air.
 
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