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It never really even made it to near me. There is like maybe 1 out of every 100 stations that have it. Then it was such low volume that when people actually used it, their cars got all messed up because the etoh absorbed too much water from the air and wouldn't run in a car. I know this happened to 2 people I know. They stopped trying to use it after that.
 

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MOPAR Parts & Service Pro
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I hope they do away with both E-85 and E-10. Corn needs to be on my plate next to the potatos, not in my fuel tank.
 

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PT Driver
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I used it once in my dad's van (because it is a flex fuel vehicle) didn't seem to hurt it one bit, but thats the only time I've used it in a personal vehicle. at work my shift is supposed to fill up any vehicle designed for E-85, with E-85. I'm sure the morning shift has hated me for the times I filled up the gas duallies with E-85 :lol:
 

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I had thought Brazil had gone totally Ethanol, however, last I heard they've got a huge contract (compliments of USGov money handout) to drill for more oil offshore (in the Gulf).
 

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I hope they do away with both E-85 and E-10. Corn needs to be on my plate next to the potatos, not in my fuel tank.
Food-grade corn is not used in the production of ethanol of fuel.
 

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I had thought Brazil had gone totally Ethanol, however, last I heard they've got a huge contract (compliments of USGov money handout) to drill for more oil offshore (in the Gulf).
Brazil uses sugar-based ethanol fuel. You get much more yield out of sugar than you do corn. Our climate just isn't one conducive to growing enough sugar. And corn doesn't have a very good yield. Corn is most certainly not the best feedstock for the production of E-85, and I hope continuing research identifies other feedstocks. Algae is undergoing a lot of research right now.

I used E-85 all the time in our '03 Grand Caravan. Well, I say "all the time". I used it everytime I passed the one station around here that had it, which was once every few months. But I did use it every chance I got. It reduced my fuel mileage by about 20%. I was getting an even 20 MPG on the highway with it. But if you consider that my 20 gallon tank only had 3 gallons of petroleum in it, I was getting 133 MPG of gasoline. :lol:
 

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We can easily get E85 in the Twin Cities where I live. I never tried it, but my 2003 van is a flex fuel vehicle. There was an article in our Sunday paper examining what went wrong with E85. A major thing - E85 yields 26% less energy than gasoline, therefore it needed to be priced at least 26% less than gas at the pump. I just passed a station the other day and the E85 was only 20% less than gas - not good!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am in Minnesota and that was a Pioneer Press article.
There are E-85 stations all over, but that article indicated that some are going away.
The US has a pretty good source for sugar, it is called the sugar beet.
The problem with ethanol is that the existing plants are dependent on corn. Whether it is food corn or not, it jacks up the cost of food source corn. Even if it is feed corn, it will effect other foods such as chicken, beef, or pork.
This state in particular has given way too much in subsidies and special rules regarding their plants as it is. I can honestly say that I will never be an ethanol backer.
 

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Vendor
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Thanks to ethanol, you are paying less in subsidies that you would have otherwise.

There has not been a LDP (load deficiency payment) in more than 5 years. What is that? It is what the government pays farmers when the price of corn is lower than what it costs to produce it.

As for the price of food, the spikes in food costs were due to $4.00 gas and diesel prices. Corn is a minimal cost in the overall food pricing.

E-85 from a cost per gallon stand point is a wash as long as the price break is $0.35 different. I burn it as much as I can, but since i moved away from the pump, I no longer burn it exclusively. My van burned it for almost 70,000 miles of the 100,000 it has on it. Last oil test showed that my engine will gladly make it to 200,000!

From,
Your site farmer.
 

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E-85 from a cost per gallon stand point is a wash as long as the price break is $0.35 different.
I don't understand your point. Based on energy/gal of E-85 vs. E-0, the "price break" is a ratio or percentage, not a fixed value...

Are you saying that you'd go with, say, $3.65 E-85 over $4.00 E-0?

-Jim
 

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I rent cars regularly for my job and I've used E-85 many times in Flex fuel models I've driven. I've found on FF Impalas the mpg drop isn't huge. In most states it's not worth it to use E-85 when you figure the mpg drop. In Iowa, they must subsidize it much heavier than other states because it's often $0.70-$0.90 less than E-10. When I'm traveling Iowa I will burn E-85 all the time as long as I can find it. I'm personally not an Ethanol supporter but I use it. I'm just glad we still have the choice to burn non-ethanol gas unlike in MO, MN, WI for example.

I don't understand why someone would burn E-85 if it's only $0.30, $0.20 etc less than gasoline. In that case, it's a losing proposition.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The only time I have ever put E-85 into a car was to top off the tank in a rental car before returning it.
 

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I rent cars regularly for my job and I've used E-85 many times in Flex fuel models I've driven. I've found on FF Impalas the mpg drop isn't huge. In most states it's not worth it to use E-85 when you figure the mpg drop. In Iowa, they must subsidize it much heavier than other states because it's often $0.70-$0.90 less than E-10. When I'm traveling Iowa I will burn E-85 all the time as long as I can find it. I'm personally not an Ethanol supporter but I use it. I'm just glad we still have the choice to burn non-ethanol gas unlike in MO, MN, WI for example.

I don't understand why someone would burn E-85 if it's only $0.30, $0.20 etc less than gasoline. In that case, it's a losing proposition.
I live in Middleton (suburb of Madison) and purchase gas from a station less than a mile from me that sells both E10 and 100% gas 87 octane.

Keep in mind in IA, as well as much of WI and MN, the source for the ethanol is much closer, hence less cost in shipping the product to the pumps.
 

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I live in Middleton (suburb of Madison) and purchase gas from a station less than a mile from me that sells both E10 and 100% gas 87 octane.

Keep in mind in IA, as well as much of WI and MN, the source for the ethanol is much closer, hence less cost in shipping the product to the pumps.
Are you sure the station by you is selling 100% gas? I'm pretty sure WI switched a couple years ago and started putting a minimum of E10 in all grades. My inlaws live in Oshkosh and I used to like buying non-E10 gas but all stations now are E-10. I remember reading about it that WI switched.
 

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Yes I am. One 87 octane option has an E10 sticker, the other option does not and is $.10-.12 higher. Additionally, there is clear signage on the station on the price of E10 and non-E10. It is not law in WI, but they have been trying to make it so for many years. Right now the only areas required to sell E10 are those designated by the EPA- Milwaukee and surrounding counties, Brown County, Door County, and a few others. There is a predominance of Ethanol gas in Wisconsin since much of Wisconsin's market requires it, but it is possible to find gasoline without it in some areas of the state. I know of two stations in the Madison area where you can get non-ethanol gas, and I've heard there are a few more.
 

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Are you sure the station by you is selling 100% gas? I'm pretty sure WI switched a couple years ago and started putting a minimum of E10 in all grades. My inlaws live in Oshkosh and I used to like buying non-E10 gas but all stations now are E-10. I remember reading about it that WI switched.
You may be thinking Illinois? All of our fuel is 10% ethanol here.
 

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Yes I am. One 87 octane option has an E10 sticker, the other option does not and is $.10-.12 higher. Additionally, there is clear signage on the station on the price of E10 and non-E10. It is not law in WI, but they have been trying to make it so for many years. Right now the only areas required to sell E10 are those designated by the EPA- Milwaukee and surrounding counties, Brown County, Door County, and a few others. There is a predominance of Ethanol gas in Wisconsin since much of Wisconsin's market requires it, but it is possible to find gasoline without it in some areas of the state. I know of two stations in the Madison area where you can get non-ethanol gas, and I've heard there are a few more.
Ok, The Fox cities area must be included then. Up until about 2 years ago, I could fill up at almost any station around Oshkosh and it was 100% gas. Now all stations have E-10 in all grades.

You may be thinking Illinois? All of our fuel is 10% ethanol here.
No, WI since I have seen the change. MO also switched all gas to E-10 but they aren't required to label the pumps.

We minivan'd across Iowa and back over the weekend and I noticed E-85 has gone way up in price. There's a station I normally stop at just West of DM on I-80 and they always had E-85 the cheapest I've seen. I stopped there yesterday and their E-85 was only $0.33 cheaper than E-10. All summer long, gas was roughly the same price as now but E-85 was $0.60-$0.80 cheaper. Maybe corn prices spiked?
 

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I don't understand your point. Based on energy/gal of E-85 vs. E-0, the "price break" is a ratio or percentage, not a fixed value...

Are you saying that you'd go with, say, $3.65 E-85 over $4.00 E-0?

-Jim
Yes. It would equal out to the exact same Price per Mile for either fuel.
 
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