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2019 Dodge Grand Caravan GT
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2019 DGC GT with just over 76k miles that I purchased about six months ago from Enterprise car sales. All that I have checked so far is the engine oil and tires, oil looks clean and the tires must have been replaced just before I bought it.

My question is, does anyone know how well Enterprise keeps to the Dodge maintenance recommendations?

Should I wait till 90k miles to do the trans fluid or do it soon? Have not looked at the fluid but will this weekend.

Should I just follow the manual for maintenance items or do all of it and start at zero miles?

Under other circumstances I would not be asking but I want this van to be my last vehicle and y’all seem to know what you are talking about.

Eric


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Anybody's guess. Best they left it alone except for oil / filter changes and air / cabin filter changes.

Your transmission should be fine but, for peace of mind, change fluid and filter and put on a new pan with a drain plug while you are at it. After that, just do fluid changes.

Check your transmission fluid level using the "cold turkey" method and see what you get.
 

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2008 Chrysler Town & Country Limited 4.0
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In addition to a transmission fluid/filter change, I'd pull the brake calipers off and grease up all of the sliding/contact points. At that point, it's not much work to pull off the caliper brackets, remove the rotors, and slather a little grease on the rotor/hub mating surface.
 

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We purchased vehicles from Enterprise in the pass. Our DGC was 1 year old and had 18k on it! It was a Fleet lease and needed front tires soon after we got it. They do very little Maintenace on them? Outside of the remotes and mats being gone we had no problems so far.
I always try buy them with some of the factory warranty on them. And change engine oil and filter at a dealer. Yes, this one was from a Dodge dealer and was certified. Good luck with yours.
 

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In addition to a transmission fluid/filter change, I'd pull the brake calipers off and grease up all of the sliding/contact points. At that point, it's not much work to pull off the caliper brackets, remove the rotors, and slather a little grease on the rotor/hub mating surface.
Yes, for good measure, brakes should be taken apart and serviced yearly. Front brakes are likely ready to be changed, if not done already, once the rotors are checked, inner and outer.
 

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2019 Dodge Grand Caravan GT
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks y’all.

The brakes are excellent so I will get things together for the trans fluid/filter/pan change and go from there. I have next week off so I will get a better look at the van then.

Eric


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2013 Dodge Grand Caravan
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Mine was an Enterprise rental before I got it at 33k. The transmission had noticeable shifting delay at 67k, which was immediately resolved with a fluid and filter change. I advise anyone to change their fluid at 60k intervals, regardless of rental usage or not.
 

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I bought my van, ex-Enterprise rental, as CPO from Chrysler dealer, with 53k on it I was told by the service dept. that when they sell, the rental companies will change the brake pads, and put on the cheapest tires they have. Mine are Primewell, and they wore OK, but are 7 yrs. old and will be replaced in Jan.
Why was I talking to service dept...trans was shot at 68k. While they had it, they found the ticking noise and replaced the rollers and cam.
Net, net, I would change the trans. fluid, using Chrysler fluid and give a good listen to the engine. Then let it ride...
 

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Work in the used car department at one of the largest dealers in Texas. We get auction cars from all over the country. And buy up rental fleets in the mass. Had 90 wranglers come through within a week about a month ago.
Anyway, my experience, they change the oil, tires, and pad slap them. Can't say enterprise specifically. But I haven't came across a rental that hasn't need any other maintenance item.
 

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Here, vehicles that are "certified", means something. They can be held accountable for their multi-point inspection to list them as "certified". I have done it and had a couple things fixed that their inspection didn't pick up, a missing splash shield for one. There's also a road safety inspection document required (suspension, tires, etc.). If a vehicle comes into the Dealership, there is a list made of what's required to certify the vehicle, new pads, turned rotors, etc. There's also a short warranty.

Otherwise they are basically "as is" sales, common for older / high mileage vehicles.
 

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I used to rent a lot of cars from Enterprise. Maintenance was very bad on some, where it was obvious the oil hadn’t been changed even though there was a current sticker in the window, and good on others. The airports are the worst for maintenance. The smaller, local offices do a good job.
I owned one car that was an ex-Avis rental and never had an issue.
i would assume the worst and do all the maintenance that’s due or past due.
 

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Here, vehicles that are "certified", means something. They can be held accountable for their multi-point inspection to list them as "certified". I have done it and had a couple things fixed that their inspection didn't pick up, a missing splash shield for one. There's also a road safety inspection document required (suspension, tires, etc.). If a vehicle comes into the Dealership, there is a list made of what's required to certify the vehicle, new pads, turned rotors, etc. There's also a short warranty.

Otherwise they are basically "as is" sales, common for older / high mileage vehicles.
Yes. I'm at a Chevy/buick and CDJR dealer.

Certified pre owned for GM and CDJR are way more involved than just a dealer certified or used car recondition. We have the 4 categories.
Certified Chrysler
Certified GM
Not listing my dealers name, but "dealer certified"
Then just a recondition.

Vehicle type, age, mileage, condition all factor into what category it goes into. And if it isn't worth fixing, it's either a cash car or goes right to auction. Our owners frequently auctions online several times a week. And ship cars out weekly.
 

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2012 Dodge Grand Caravan SE
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Former Enterprise Employee POV*
Granted, I left the company (after 5 good years) in 2007. My brother in law still works there, so I’ll have to get an update. Generally the oil changes were done, with a general goal of 5,000 mile intervals. The company term we called them were LOFRs ‘loafer’, Lube Oil Filter Rotation.

The interval may have changed as many cars go well over 5,000 miles that even on Dino oil. My van let me go 9,000 miles before the Change Oil notice came due—though I changed it before that.

The computer notified us if it needed service, and as a manager we were required to keep our maintenance under a certain percentage of fleet. Yes, smalller rentals locations made it easier to service the smaller fleet, but the company values their investment, so I never saw a car go an insane mileage, maybe saw a handful of 12-15,000 miles. People would rent them due for service and return a rental after 2 months of their insurance wreck replacement with another 5,000 miles. I never saw a car explode, due to poor oil quality. I’ll never forget the one vehicle that failed spectacularly (at 20 miles) was a Jeep Liberty—sorry Chrysler.

Thing I noted was we’d take the cars in and it’s whether the contracted company (Firestone, Pep Boys…) actually did the work. I trust they did, but they often failed to do the tire rotation. I used to chalk some tires to confirm, and scold them. Manufacturer specific maintenance is not done, it was just a blanket interval, but their computer software is probably better now-so maybe they can vary that interval especially for their high-end fleet.

They’re holding vehicles still longer, they used to pull most cars before b2b warranty expires, A couple years ago they started to rotate the fleet out at 60-80k with the poor market, but that’s changing. Prices are coming way down. A 2019 DGC with 90k+ miles was $23k+ a year ago, but now under $19k with under 70k miles. They’ve got the Chrysler Voyagers out here and they’re a good value. I’m considering one.

My first car purchase was an Enterprise 2001 Maxima, a single-user fleet-lease vehicle, last year or Japanese manufacture, with 16,000 miles. I owned it for 15 years and 140,000mi with little issues, and remains a lore vehicle held in super. high regard and continues on with a friend’s daughter. I then bought a 2014 Frontier from Hertz, a great deal (23k mi for $22,000!) and it was also fine, but had dents I didn’t originally see. You can find some great deals. I think Hertz tends to have the better deals and better trim lines of vehicles.

In closing, I’d wait until the mileage-at-sale is (at least) under the power-train warranty for the vehicle. The smaller compact cars generally get held the longest, and most abused and re-rented quicker and thus are hard to keep clean. People tend care for even the rentals well if they’re clean and such, but that’s tough if they turn over so often. Trucks and SUVs tend to get pulled early and get sold for the most profit. Despite common concerns, the large majority of the vehicles I saw weren't abused. If cars get wrecked hard, they’re pulled and auctioned. Also, rental companies don’t make money on the rental, they make money on the ‘flip’ or remarketing sale of the vehicle. They pull the specific vehicle right at the peak of its value, which may be 3,000 miles, or 90,000 miles, depending on the market. The rental income simply covers the depreciation.
 

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...
I’ll never forget the one vehicle that failed spectacularly (at 20 miles) was a Jeep Liberty—sorry Chrysler.
...
Okay now. How you going to tease that story and just walk away from it? :p
 
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Thing I noted was we’d take the cars in and it’s whether the contracted company (Firestone, Pep Boys…) actually did the work. I trust they did, but they often failed to do the tire rotation. I used to chalk some tires to confirm, and scold them.
Wheel rotation = lug nut punishment, over torquing, possibility for incomplete work - wheel falls off. Best they leave them alone. :)
 

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Work in the used car department at one of the largest dealers in Texas. We get auction cars from all over the country. And buy up rental fleets in the mass. Had 90 wranglers come through within a week about a month ago.
Anyway, my experience, they change the oil, tires, and pad slap them. Can't say enterprise specifically. But I haven't came across a rental that hasn't need any other maintenance item.
In 2012, I bought an enterprise 2010 grand Caravan with 65,000 miles… I think you are spot on, might have had the oil changed, definitely a pad slap, and I get the feeling the tires were changed a year or so earlier-it was a great van though.

I’ve bought a lot of government surplus vehicles in the past (gsa). I’ve actually requested the records via the freedom of information act; I will say that Maintenance records are pretty spotty at best. But I have had some really, really great GSA vehicles. My current is a 2011 grand Caravan Express that I bought in 2017(?) with 68,000 miles for $6400…. It has 128,000 now.

On a sidenote, in 1992 a dealership that I was working for had purchased two GEO trackers from the auction… They were only a year old and I don’t think had 12,000 miles. Apparently they have been used exclusively at the beach and when the mechanic inspected the brakes … the owner had an unpleasant surprise. He ended up having to wait two months for parts to be shipped from abroad as many of the components had rusted so badly.
 

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We all worry too much about oil overall. Rental cars, and the way I’ve watched a sales team abuse trucks taught me long ago that my 5000 mile interval was not an issue, and pushing to 7500 miles after some highway travel isn’t either.
The previous owner of my van, according to CARFAX waited until the light came on, as the oil changes were in the 10k mile range. Car and Driver would also suggest to maintain a car in this fashion.
Enterprise having some extended intervals isn’t killer.

what is though, is waiting until 25k miles to do the first oil change. I had 2 sales guys do that I. The fleet I managed, which wasn’t discovered until after they were fired. Those poor trucks were never right after that.
 

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We all worry too much about oil overall. Rental cars, and the way I’ve watched a sales team abuse trucks taught me long ago that my 5000 mile interval was not an issue, and pushing to 7500 miles after some highway travel isn’t either.
The previous owner of my van, according to CARFAX waited until the light came on, as the oil changes were in the 10k mile range. Car and Driver would also suggest to maintain a car in this fashion.
Enterprise having some extended intervals isn’t killer.

what is though, is waiting until 25k miles to do the first oil change. I had 2 sales guys do that I. The fleet I managed, which wasn’t discovered until after they were fired. Those poor trucks were never right after that.
Some of the car manufactures put in break-oil..They do want it change early! Our car manual and manufacture state 10k the dealer wants to change oil at 5k.
I have had many fleet vehicles and change oil at 7.5k. Never an engine problem one. Yes, I drove them from brand new till over +100k.
 

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Okay now. How you going to tease that story and just walk away from it? :p
Oh, it was pretty insane. You could say I teased it out of the car. First off, something didn’t feel right with the Liberty. I was driving it from where we staged new cars, and it was still wrapped in plastic. As I recall, I gunned the engine, and the transmission just completely failed. No limp mode, just noises and no power. I put it in Park, and then drive, and pressed the Accelerator.
Then, the engine temp overheated and started smoking and ‘boom’, loud metallic rattling. A River of oil dribbled down the pavement. Come to find out, the transmission AND engine both destroyed. A rod blew thru the oil pan.
Literally, 20 miles on the odometer.
 
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