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2005 Town & Country 251k miles
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Please stay away from flush machines they can kill the AT. Can do 3x Drain and Fill of ATF+4. A 3x will get most of the old fluid out. Drive for a few days in between each D/F. There are some aftermarket AT pans which feature a removable drain plug which can make the D/F job easier. Or, can use an oil pump to siphon the fluid through the dipstick tube. I have the one below.

 

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Nothing in the Owner's Manual about "flushing" for maintenance. In fact, Chrysler WARNS about flushing machines and the chemicals used for flushing.

To facilitate a fluid drop, get a transmission pan with a drain plug. Drain it once a year, or two, with an oil change or whatever.

My recommendation is to use Mopar transmission fluid. It shoud be the exact right stuff. Although a transmission fluid meets ATF+4 specs, there are differences, Pour Point being one of them per Technical Data Sheets.




 

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fix it if you can
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It is not a nice color
Chrysler specifically states that color is not a wear indicator.

Personally, I'd evac the fluid (via dipstick) and replace with licensed ATF+4, drive 5-600 miles and repeat fluid replacement, drive 12-1500 miles and drop the pan and replace the filter and refill.
Light throttle 1-2 shift jerk is a known characteristic, keep rpms above 2,000 and it should not occur.
 

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I would never have a power flush done on any transmission.

Normally, I just change the fluid and filter.

If I want to change ALL the fluid, I do the fluid and filter change. Then, I pop the cooler lines off, start the engine, and add new fluid as the old is pumped out. Then, I shut the engine off, reconnect the lines, and top off as needed.
 

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flush? no

drop pan, refill with fresh ATF+4? maybe

seems like almost everyone has a rough 1-2 shift though, i just live with mine and play with the throttle to make it smoother
A top chrysler tech explained to me to keep this trans compact,
an overun clutch that should should have been built in to one of the gearsets (2nd maybe) was not included.
I believe they figured they would get away with some trans programming fiddling.
 

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2002 Chrysler Town & Country Limited AWD 3.8L
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Particulate content and not fluid breakdown being the bigger/earlier issue, a high-efficiency spin-on aux filter (and maybe a strong magnet) would solve all the potential flush and fluid change issues above. It would also be cheaper than draining and filling pan with Mopar fluid every year in no time.
 

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3rd gen > all others
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I don't understand the problem everyone has with the modern "flush" or exchanger machines. If you are only exchanging the old fluid for new, there is nothing wrong with them. I'd do a pan drop/cleanout/filter first, then fill with fluid and flush. The machine uses the transmission's fluid pump to exchange the fluid, so it's not forced through at weird pressures. No damage done.

You have to factor in the cost of a spin-on filter kit and additional fluid, plus time/labor to install vs. pulling a plug to drain/refill the pan. It might take a few years just to break even. It financially might not make sense, but in practice may be a better way to maintain the transmission and keep it clean. Although, you'd still have to change out that filter once in a while and add the lost fluid, so more cost. Depends how heavily you use the transmission/van I guess to justify it, and how long you plan to keep it. If starting with a newish van, I can see it as a great investment.
 
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Nothing wrong with a simple fluid exchange, whether it's done (1) by a pan drop/drain, (2) pumping out through the filler tube, or (3) using the transmission's pump via the cooler lines. The term "flush" implies flushing agents (chemicals) and/or using auxillery power pumps, with or without reverse flow, all of which which can cause havoc within the transmission.

For the 5th Generation Chrysler is specific
Do not use chemical flushes in your transmission as the chemicals can damage your transmission components. Such damage is not covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty
Your vehicle has been built with improved fluids that protect the performance and durability of your vehicle and also allow extended maintenance intervals. Do not use chemical flushes in these components as the chemicals can damage your engine, transmission, or air conditioning. Such damage is not covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. If a flush is needed because of component malfunction, use only the specified fluid for the flushing procedure.
Specified fluid would be ATF+4 for the transmission (41TE and 62TE).

Chrysler isn't the only automobile manufacture singing this song. Check your Owner's Manuals.

The flushing machines, at the Dealership and Shops, use chemicals (Wynn's flushing machine for example) and become money makers for the business. Yes, money making upsells. Listening to Chrysler, this is a disservice to the Customer. Then again, aren't most upsells?

Wynn's video:

For entertainment:

.
 

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3rd Gen Plebeian
1997 Plymouth Grand Voyager Rallye
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My formulas and chart to determine percentage of oil changed
 

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fix it if you can
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The danger of exchanging all ATF at once on a neglected trans is that new fluid will have plenty of detergents that can loosen up clumps of sediment (even without external pressure).

gradually changing the fluid to bring it to "like new" condition will, in theory, loosen those sediment deposits over time very gradually.

YMMV, @LEVY (RIP) swore by never changing the fluid and seemed to get away with it.
 

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The danger of exchanging all ATF at once on a neglected trans is that new fluid will have plenty of detergents that can loosen up clumps of sediment (even without external pressure).
IMO, the actual "danger" level of just doing a fluid exchange is pretty darn low.

@LEVY (RIP) swore by never changing the fluid and seemed to get away with it.
People get away with all sorts of things. It doesn't necessarily make them a good idea. I'm not going to lie.... I definitely don't miss reading the same line of BS where he told people that they were somehow going to trash their transmissions just by changing their ATF..... literally every freakin' time the subject came up.:rolleyes:
 

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Personally, I couldn't give a rat's arse whether the bean counters tell people to change their ATF or not. Whether the fluid is changed or not, they know a trans normally lasts past the warranty period. After that, they don't care because if it fails, they aren't the ones paying for it. They are also in the business of selling new vehicles.... not keeping the old ones going forever.

ATF is WAY cheaper than a trans rebuild or replacement, so I consider it cheap insurance to just go ahead and change it periodically.
 

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The transmission filter is not much of a filter. It's way less efficient than an oil filter, even a low end oil filter.
Modern pan filters average about 100-micron filtering efficiency (see the sidebar), with older screen filters as poor as 200. For comparison, an average engine oil filter can remove particles about 25 microns in size.
The system is basically closed and if the filter gets dirty, there's something untoward going on in the transmission, or there was dirt in there from day 1. Inline filters (return cooler line) do a better job of filtering (more efficient). Ford and Chrysler use to include them (Magnefine?) with their remanufactured transmissions. Being real serious about filtration would involve using a better filter system.

Fluid changes are more about replenishment of the additive package than anything else. The friction modifiers can get used up, hence the "severe service" (frequent trailer towing mainly i.e. heavy duty use and nothing to do with cold starts, idling, short trips, or such engine type severe service). A tramsmission pan drain plug is ideal for transmission fluid maintenance/upgrades and every pan should have one. Pumping out through the tube is another way (been there, done that) but not so easy with the 62TE because of the "dipstick stop".
The Dipstick Stop
 
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