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I'm about to begin the reassembly process for my 1999 GCSE after finding the evaporator had a sizable leak.

Right now I'm looking at the blower fan and it does not spin freely. It has a bit of resistance. Now that may or may not be a bad thing depending on the internal construction. But it is a AWFUL lot of work to put it all back together only to find the blower fan needs replacing a few months from now.

SO...to anyone who has been here.....

Does your blower fan spin totally unrestricted and free OR does it seem to have some resistance when you spin it by hand?

If I give mine a good push, it stops spinning almost immediately. Within 2 - 3 seconds.

But I have no idea if that's normal or indicates a fan near the end of it's useful life for this application on this vehicle.
 

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If it is spinning for 2-3 seconds, that doesn't sound too bad, really. There is usually some resistance felt due to the strong magnets in the motor.

These motors (afaik) use sleeve bearings. You might be able to open up the motor and see how much brush material is left, and if it looks serviceable, put a drop of electric motor oil (there is a special 3-in-1 product specifically made for electric motor sleeve bearings -- don't just use normal automotive oil or household 3-in-1 oil) in the felt bearing surrounds on each end of the motor and reassemble. Don't over-lube it. Sleeve bearings don't need a ton of oil.

I replaced the blower motor on our '98 a year and a half ago, due to worn brushes. The aftermarket unit (I got it from O'Reilly) we used generates considerably more hum in operation due to its internal construction. You can probably tell if that will happen by examining the new motor before buying it -- turn the shaft, and if it has only a handful of positions (not sure how many - might be 6 to 10) in each 360° turn where the shaft tends to "stop", and it tends to stop fairly strongly, then it will hum, especially on the lower blower speed settings. If there are many more such positions, the hum should be a fair bit less.

The motor is not hard to replace later on though -- no dash disassembly needed, just access it from underneath. I may have had to remove the glovebox door, but that's it. I think the hardest part is getting the squirrel wheel off the old shaft and on the new...

- G
 
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