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Discussion Starter #1
OK, newbie here, and I am completely stumped.
The facts: 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan 3.8L, ABS, Front & Rear Disc.

The problem. Last summer I installed new autozone mid grade pads and rotors on the front. about 2 months later I noticed tremendous brake dust on the passenger front side. then I heard the metal wear indicator. at that point I changed the pads again (autozone ceramic this time), pulled the slide pins, cleaned and greased everything with high temp brake grease. Problem solved, right? Wrong!!. This past January, there was the dust and the wear indicator again. so new pads (autozone ceramic),, and this time, I replaced the passenger side caliper, and guide pins, greased all pins again, as well as the flex lines (both driver and passenger) (thinking one may be partially collapsed.) as well as flushed the old brake fluid. everything moves freely. However, I have been watching the wear closely over the past few months, and the pads on the passenger side front are still wearing out about twice as fast as the drivers side. I am truly stumped, and the mechanic I asked, as well as my dad, can't come up with anything, I haven't already done.

My idea now is: could the passenger side be doing all of the braking for the car, and the drivers side caliper be weak? there is break dust on the drivers side, but at this point I just don't know.

So any advise or large hammers ya'll could provide, that I could throw at it would be greatly appreciated.

Sorry I was long winded, just hope I didn't leave anything out.
 

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How does the van stop? If it stops straight and with no problems (like easy brake fade or not enough braking power) I would suspect an ABS problem. If it pulls or something, I would suspect that the master cylinder is weak. The drivers caliper is fine as long as it is clean and lubed properly and not leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
According to the daily driver (my wife) it stops fine, and I have not noticed any change in peddle feel. So by your thinking I may have an ABS issue? how do I diagnose that without throwing parts at it?
 

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I would get a pressure gauge made for screwing into the brake bleeder holes and reading the pressures between sides. If the pressures are different, then you know a component is at fault. Is the passenger side tire hard to turn when you jack it up?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I will double check how easy it is to spin the tire with it jacked up tonight and let you know. I know the last time I had it up in the air it was easy to spin.
 

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I will double check how easy it is to spin the tire with it jacked up tonight and let you know. I know the last time I had it up in the air it was easy to spin.
If it is easy to turn, have someone press the brakes a few times in a row, then you try and spin the wheel as soon as they let off. See if any residual pressure is staying backed up while the pedal is not pressed.
 

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Perhaps the Driver's side brake is not doing its job so well, putting more wear on the Passenger's side.
Inner or outer pad or both?
Any looseness in the wheel bearing on the Passenger's side?
Is most of the hard braking done on left hand turns?
Are the back brakes wearing evenly?
 

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Drivin' Maniac
2002 Grand Caravan ES 3.8L
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X2 to the idea that the DRIVER's Side caliper is the culprit.

That's the part I'd replace next.

+++++++

With the advent of dual-diagonal braking systems (where the RF and LR, and LF and RR, are on individual brake "circuits"), brake pull is a thing of the past. You are a good owner to have noticed the difference in brake dusting.
 

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You can have a collapsed flex hose on the right side. It opens under pressure, but as it is collapsed it doesn't allow the pads to completely retract. Get a cheap infrared thermometer and check rotor temperature.
 

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I will often compare the heat per wheel to see if there's a cold brake or hot brake situation. Do a couple of hard stops on a straight piece of road. Then check each rotor for heat to see if one rotor is considerably cooler (or hotter) than the others. Be careful not to burn your fingers.
 

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Crossed circuits to not alleviate brake pull, just enable the system to half work if one side fails. Before crossed systems, if the rears failed, you could stop well, if the fronts failed you could not.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK, not much of an update, time has been tight this week. Jacked it up and did the spin test. no noticeable drag on the passenger side front. I think the next thing will be to test the rotor temp. as suggested above, but I will have to buy and infrared thermometer, I know, what a shame, I have to go buy a tool, just terrible! ya'll will be my wife's best new friends!!
 

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I got one of these from Harbor Freight a while back to check bearing and tire temps on my trailer. It is inexpensive and is reasonably accurate for these purposes.

I would definitely check out the calipers on both sides, check out the line pressure and make sure both sides are well bled and have good clean fluid (while you are at it bleed all the lines starting from the passenger rear).

Not too sure about the ABS theory. You can tell when the ABS engages because it pulsates in a pretty noticable way.
 

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OK, not much of an update, time has been tight this week. Jacked it up and did the spin test. no noticeable drag on the passenger side front. I think the next thing will be to test the rotor temp. as suggested above, but I will have to buy and infrared thermometer, I know, what a shame, I have to go buy a tool, just terrible! ya'll will be my wife's best new friends!!
On both my vehicles I can easily compare the hotness by touch. No special tool needed unless the temperature difference is minimal, in which case, both brakes are basically working the same.
 

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Not if the man wants a new tool. :biggrin:
 

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and make sure both sides are well bled and have good clean fluid (while you are at it bleed all the lines starting from the passenger rear).

.
I could be wrong, but I believe it should be

drivers rear, then passenger front, then passenger rear, then drivers front

at least that is what it is for my 06
 

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i was told start with one farthest from the master cylinder and work towards the one closest last.
 

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i was told start with one farthest from the master cylinder and work towards the one closest last.
this was before the crossed circuits. Trophyslayer has it right for the new systems. Though if you are bleeding just for new fluid, not for air, it doesn't really matter.
 

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this was before the crossed circuits. Trophyslayer has it right for the new systems. Though if you are bleeding just for new fluid, not for air, it doesn't really matter.
X2 When replacing brake fluid, there is no sequence required.
 

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umm, not to overstate the obvious but what about rotor surface...? [don't see any mention of it @ putting ceramic pads on.. assuming the previous pads&rotors didn't exhibit this wear pattern]
 
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