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They keep forgetting to mention the K-Car. I bought a used 1981 Plymouth Reliant, with a California exhaust manifold/front pipe, and a power bench seat. A power seat in the 1981 was unheard of and the California exhaust ..... well ..... didn't need that in Nova Scotia. It was a Chrysler executive driven car .... maybe by Lee himself.

That vehicle, and its clunks and rattles, lasted a long time. Thank you Lee Iacocca
 

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They keep forgetting to mention the K-Car. I bought a used 1981 Plymouth Reliant, with a California exhaust manifold/front pipe, and a power bench seat. A power seat in the 1981 was unheard of and the California exhaust ..... well ..... didn't need that in Nova Scotia. It was a Chrysler executive driven car .... maybe by Lee himself.

That vehicle, and its clunks and rattles, lasted a long time. Thank you Lee Iacocca
People seem to only remember him for his days at Ford, and merely gloss over his days at Chrysler. Because of him Chrysler survives today (thanks to the K-car), came out with the first modern minivan, bought up AMC (and Jeep), and briefly had Lamborghini under Chrysler's wings which helped to save Lamborghini. He lobbied for a loan from the government for Chrysler which was later paid in full with interest years early.

To me he was more than just an automotive icon, he was an automotive legend and hero. He will be missed.
 

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They keep forgetting to mention the K-Car. I bought a used 1981 Plymouth Reliant, with a California exhaust manifold/front pipe, and a power bench seat. A power seat in the 1981 was unheard of and the California exhaust ..... well ..... didn't need that in Nova Scotia. It was a Chrysler executive driven car .... maybe by Lee himself.

That vehicle, and its clunks and rattles, lasted a long time. Thank you Lee Iacocca
What I never understood regarding that car in particular, is why they offered three engine options, Mitsubishi 2.6 and Chrysler 2.2 and 2.5 engines.

Many people imported those vehicles to Mexico, but avoided the Mitsubishi engine.

In my opinion, the Mitsubishi engine was a big mistake.
 

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What I never understood regarding that car in particular, is why they offered three engine options, Mitsubishi 2.6 and Chrysler 2.2 and 2.5 engines.

Many people imported those vehicles to Mexico, but avoided the Mitsubishi engine.

In my opinion, the Mitsubishi engine was a big mistake.
Greetings and right on Levy. The Mitsubishi engine was a real pain in the arse. It was the Mitsubishi engine that had all the problems with the over filling situation that would plug up the charcoal filters and cause the carburetors to flood. The diesel version was extremely poor. Definitely a mistake.
 

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What I never understood regarding that car in particular, is why they offered three engine options, Mitsubishi 2.6 and Chrysler 2.2 and 2.5 engines.

Many people imported those vehicles to Mexico, but avoided the Mitsubishi engine.

In my opinion, the Mitsubishi engine was a big mistake.
Chrysler was in some kind of partnership with Mitsubishi at the time which included a small tough truck for Chrysler (Dodge Ram 50) and some small cars, I think (Dodge Colt). They changed a gasket in the counter balance chain area for the 2,6L and an oil passage was partly blocked. The engine would seize up resulting in a very expensive repair bill. Cylinder head gaskets could blow. The carburetor was a nightmare. Otherwise the engine was okay.

In the wake of the fuel crisis of 1972, automakers and buyers alike became obsessed with fuel economy but did not want to sacrifice performance in the name of pinching pennies at the pump (sound familiar, anyone?).



With a base 1.6-liter 4-cylinder and optional 2.6-liter making 77- and 105-horsepower, respectively, the Sapporo wasn't a drag strip king, but it was more than potent enough for daily driving.

With a base 1.6-liter 4-cylinder and optional 2.6-liter making 77- and 105-horsepower, respectively, the Sapporo wasn't a drag strip king, but it was more than potent enough for daily driving.
(CHRYSLER VIA CARLUSTBLOG.COM)
The necessity for fuel-efficient cars pushed American automakers into partnerships with foreign counterparts, most notably the union of the Chrysler Group and Mitsubishi Motors that spawned such cars as the Mitsubishi 3000GT and Dodge Conquest.
 

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Chrysler was in some kind of partnership with Mitsubishi at the time which included a small tough truck for Chrysler (Dodge Ram 50) and some small cars, I think (Dodge Colt).
Chrysler had offered a number of rebadged or co-developed Mitsubishis going back to the 1970s including Dodge Colt/Plymouth Champ/Colt and later Eagle Summit, Dodge Challenger/Plymouth Sapporo, Plymouth Arrow, Dodge Ram 50, Dodge Raider, Chrysler/Dodge/Plymouth Conquest, Dodge Stealth, Eagle Talon/Plymouth Laser, etc.
 
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