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2014 Chrysler Town & Country 30th Anniversary Edition. 3.6L, 211kW
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi.

Was thinking about applying some Fluid Film when autumn comes. I'm planning to buy the 400ml spray bottles. I'm also not planning to spray the whole underside of the car. At least not for the first winter.
So I'm wondering what are the most critical locations of the 5th gen T&C that should be sprayed? Wheel wells? Bottom corners of doors? I read from someone that it should be sprayed inside doors as well and into the rocker panels by removing some body plugs? What do you think how much fluid film is needed to cover those locations? And maybe I missed something.

Thanks!
 

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I do not know all the locations, but I am seeing rust over the rear wheel arches, and there are these little ledges also down by the wheels where dirt seems to collect and rust seems to bloom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do not know all the locations, but I am seeing rust over the rear wheel arches, and there are these little ledges also down by the wheels where dirt seems to collect and rust seems to bloom.
Yup, those are rust prone locations. The rear wheel location is pretty bad. Got some rust there as well.


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2013 Dodge Grand Caravan
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Best thing you can do is remove your fender liners, throw out any padding behind them, and soak everything before putting the liner back on. That and soak the entire bottom of the van. Remove any water drain plugs from the doors and rear hatch and soak inside, but don't put the plugs back in. Any place that can hold water can hold salt water.

Salt is no joke. It doesn't care that this is the first time you're driving out in it, it will rust you out all the same.
 

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Hidden areas, prone to condensation and corrosion (plus containing some foam), are the prime areas to attack. Doors, hatch and rocker panels have drain holes where product can be applied through. A 24" wand, fastened to a spray can, will give you better access and coverage but be quick with the spray as the wand dumps a lot of product quickly. Over the wheel wells will require drilling access holes (plugs available). Going through speaker openings is another alternative.

I can give exact locations for holes per my vehicle. There are some rubber plugs already in place, through which product can be sprayed.

If you know a knowledgable, experienced applicator, buy a gallon of Fluid Film and get the guy to do a thorough job for you. The individual spray cans are expensive.

Here,s a tutorial on Fluid Film application.
..

Let me know if I can be of further help. A gallon should be able to do your vehicle 2+ times.

Wand:
Gadget Audio equipment Jewellery Ceiling Cable


 

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2014 Chrysler Town & Country 30th Anniversary Edition. 3.6L, 211kW
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hidden areas, prone to condensation and corrosion (plus containing some foam), are the prime areas to attack. Doors, hatch and rocker panels have drain holes where product can be applied through. A 24" wand, fastened to a spray can, will give you better access and coverage but be quick with the spray as the wand dumps a lot of product quickly. Over the wheel wells will require drilling access holes (plugs available). Going through speaker openings is another alternative.

I can give exact locations for holes per my vehicle. There are some rubber plugs already in place, through which product can be sprayed.

If you know a knowledgable, experienced applicator, buy a gallon of Fluid Film and get the guy to do a thorough job for you. The individual spray cans are expensive.

Here,s a tutorial on Fluid Film application.
..

Let me know if I can be of further help. A gallon should be able to do your vehicle 2+ times.

Wand:
View attachment 65917

Is there anything that should not be covered with Fluid Film or it’s safe to spray it on everything? AKA there are wires and connectors inside doors.


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I spray it on all electrical connections and wiring. My engine bay in the Jeep is covered with Fluid Film. My 2016 DGC is getting there (Krown and/or Fluid Film). Previous 4th Generation DGCs had their engine bays covered as well. No electrical wiring or connector problems. Spark plug wires were sprayed as well, didn't have to replace them.

The only place I would back off is for is the soft natural rubber components like weather stripping, window and door seals. I spray my hoses with it, keeps them from drying out, they're aren't natural rubber, hence oil resistant.

A fine mist spray is best for coverage and not wasting product with over application.
 

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We used to joke that Jeepman must have a drive-through pool filled with Fluid Film because he talked about it so much. :p Get it everywhere! The more places it goes, the less places salt can easily touch.
 
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We used to joke that Jeepman must have a drive-through pool filled with Fluid Film because he talked about it so much. :p Get it everywhere! The more places it goes, the less places salt can easily touch.
Yes, don't roller skate on my driveway. Ha, ha.

There are other good corrosion protection products like Rust Check red, Rust Check green (thicker), Corrosion Free, Krown (drips), Rust Block and WoolWax (similar to/thicker than Fluid Film) that are likely less expensive too, but Fluid Film is more widely used in North America. It's been around for a long time and served the industry well (except for price in Canada).

Note, I said corrosion protection, not just rust protection, you can use FF on your guns, work boots, computer (no), wheel barrow, bicycle, roller skates, electrical gadgets and the list goes on per the FF web site.








Application is key regardless of product used. Watch out for Shops that thin their products out with used motor/transmission oils (acids, etc). The thinner for Fluid Film, if ever needed, is vegetable oil.

Krown would never need a thinner, it's actually thin enough (the only one) to drip. Park the vehicle on your lawn for a couple days after application.
 
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I too have rust at the rocker panels. Not a big surprise for a mid-Atlantic 2010 T&C. Is there any point in putting Fluid Film over the rusty spots or do those areas need to be fixed first? Thanks?
 

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Best thing you can do is remove your fender liners, throw out any padding behind them, and soak everything before putting the liner back on. That and soak the entire bottom of the van. Remove any water drain plugs from the doors and rear hatch and soak inside, but don't put the plugs back in. Any place that can hold water can hold salt water.

Salt is no joke. It doesn't care that this is the first time you're driving out in it, it will rust you out all the same.
that's an interesting idea, leaving the plugs out ! I'd like to see a few cross sections of some junk vehicles to see how much they trap debris inside !
 

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Boy, this is sounding like a gun forum.

What does Fluid film dry into? Is it a waxy sticky coating, or dry? Does it rub off with finger?
 

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that's an interesting idea, leaving the plugs out ! I'd like to see a few cross sections of some junk vehicles to see how much they trap debris inside !
Just removed them on a Journey yesterday. Owner said he heard water in the door. Leaf bits and dirt had clogged the drain holes.
 

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There are drains / small holes, at least two, in the bottoms of doors, hatches and rocker panels that are sometimes unintentionally plugged by sealant from the factory. They are often located along the seams and you may have to search a bit. They should be cleaned out so they can drain as designed. Fluid Film* can be sprayed up through these drains to add a degree of protection. A compressor, spray gun and wand will do a much better job for coverage. The bottom door/hatch seams should be treated as well. Rust loves seams.
Holes that are plugged by rubber inserts have something to do with the paint application and aren't the designed drains. How can they drain when they are plugged? They likely exceed the size allowed for drains (exhaust fumes).

More thorough protection will involve drilling a half dozen or more holes (total) in various spots such as adjacent door latches. Krown has this mapped out by vehicle, for their applicators. It's not just willy nilly. There will be one (or more) in top of the rocker panels, for the doglegs, etc. Krown treats the holes with silicone afterward. Necessary??

Rocker panels are tricky, they act as drain conduits for water that gets in at the sliding door track drains or wherever. I have seen more drains on the rocker panels on a 2004 Acura TSX than on the vans, go figure. Drainage is key. There may be foam in the rocker panels at the pillars (overspill) which blocks drainage. Also foam likely in the dog legs.

Over the rear wheel wells is an important area to get. You need a check list of areas to attack and how. A strategic plan against rust. :) There are various OE plugs that can be removed for application of product as well. Map it out.

*Fluid Film: I recommend FF, if doing it yourself, but Rust Check is another well known product at a more competitive price.
Note: The thinner for Fluid Film, if needed, is vegetable oil. Shouldn't be needed on a warm/hot day.

More informstion:
 

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There are drains / small holes, at least two, in the bottoms of doors, hatches and rocker panels that are sometimes unintentionally plugged by sealant from the factory. They are often located along the seams and you may have to search a bit. They should be cleaned out so they can drain as designed. Fluid Film* can be sprayed up through these drains to add a degree of protection. A compressor, spray gun and wand will do a much better job for coverage. The bottom door/hatch seams should be treated as well. Rust loves seams.
Holes that are plugged by rubber inserts have something to do with the paint application and aren't the designed drains. How can they drain when they are plugged? They likely exceed the size allowed for drains (exhaust fumes).

More thorough protection will involve drilling a half dozen or more holes (total) in various spots such as adjacent door latches. Krown has this mapped out by vehicle, for their applicators. It's not just willy nilly. There will be one (or more) in top of the rocker panels, for the doglegs, etc. Krown treats the holes with silicone afterward. Necessary??

Rocker panels are tricky, they act as drain conduits for water that gets in at the sliding door track drains or wherever. I have seen more drains on the rocker panels on a 2004 Acura TSX than on the vans, go figure. Drainage is key. There may be foam in the rocker panels at the pillars (overspill) which blocks drainage. Also foam likely in the dog legs.

Over the rear wheel wells is an important area to get. You need a check list of areas to attack and how. A strategic plan against rust. :) There are various OE plugs that can be removed for application of product as well. Map it out.

*Fluid Film: I recommend FF, if doing it yourself, but Rust Check is another well known product at a more competitive price.
Note: The thinner for Fluid Film, if needed, is vegetable oil. Shouldn't be needed on a warm/hot day.

More informstion:
Thank you for the thorough detail! Would like to have access holesbig enough for one ofv those small dia snake cameras !
 

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Drilled holes are 1/2" ish in diameter.
 
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Drilled holes are 1/2" ish in diameter.
Drilled holes are 1/2" ish in diameter.
Drilled holes are 1/2" ish in diameter.
Drilled holes are 1/2" ish in diameter.
there is a fiber optic camera that i saw, years ago, that was used to check engine heads and various hard to reach visuals. check this out !!
That would be great for panel, doors fenders and other inspections both before and after .

I have a t&c 2016 that has one wheel well fender skin that has the paint delaminating on the edge ,(not bubbling yet), just above the wheel well. (separating from the metal, due to the rough edge being exposed to harsh environment in the wheel well). Is there a suggested method to treat this raw edge which is seldom protected with paint , or other. If that is not clear, I can post a picture tomorrow. This has been going on for decades with the edges of panels not getting protection and or coverage .
Thank you for your Great work !!
 

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Drilled holes are 1/2" ish in diameter.
Lots of holes larger than that in the body to allow for paint flow. :)
Drilled holes are plugged. Some applicators drill no holes but may end up taking some things apart like removing tail lights to get access. I can see drilling the rocker panels to get around the foam. The wands I use can get through much smaller holes, 1/4" +/-.

 
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