The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
More reading that is not for the faint of heart.

http://www.evbones.com/s10Report.pdf

40 mile range
25 kwh to charge
Cost to charge $2.75 assuming 11 cents per kwh

Cost equivalent to getting 40mpg.

Cargo capacity (based on GVWR) = 850#

How does it compare to my Fit:
Fit will haul more at @ 950#
Fit @ 36mpg (if I do not exceed 70mph or the top speed of the truck) will cost 15% more to operate. (assume $2.85 for a gallon of gas)

Fit is LEV rated
S-10E is powered by Coal here in MI.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,203 Posts
There is just something about the possibility of +200 V or -200 V and/or 400 VDC accross the whole battery that makes me uneasy about either vehicles like this truck or hybrids.
I work around a fair amount of DC voltage, but I have flash gear and other precautions to be able to stay safe.
I sure wouldn't want that truck charging in my garage. The possibility of hydrogen build up from lead acid batteries (especially while charging) is very real.
 

·
*yawn*
Joined
·
2,992 Posts
Here's an eccentric associate's electric S-10 (not the EV1 drivetrain).

For 90% of his trips, he makes it work - else rent/borrow/bike/bum. He hasn't bought gas or oil (for a vehicle of his) in over 4 yrs... (ev mower, too)

-Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,508 Posts
400 AC is safer than DC. I can understand your concerns. Some of the EV's run as high as 600V. :ask_wsign Makes me cringe, too. :jpshakehe All that at 200+ Amps ...... :Wow1:

Granted, I can understand running a higher voltage, but that's nothing to play with, or to be around.

Would have liked to have seen under the hood, and more on the "motor" used in this.

A few years ago, I stumbled across an "electric driveshaft" for those interested in converting their vehicles. The "driveshaft" is a long narrow electric motor, you simply connect to the rear axle, in place of your regular driveshaft to the rear axle. Supposed to make a conversion lots simpler by freeing up the hood space, as well as simple to install. I'm sure it can be found using GOOGLE if anyone's interested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
400 AC is safer than DC. I can understand your concerns. Some of the EV's run as high as 600V. :ask_wsign Makes me cringe, too. :jpshakehe All that at 200+ Amps ...... :Wow1:

Granted, I can understand running a higher voltage, but that's nothing to play with, or to be around.

Would have liked to have seen under the hood, and more on the "motor" used in this.

A few years ago, I stumbled across an "electric driveshaft" for those interested in converting their vehicles. The "driveshaft" is a long narrow electric motor, you simply connect to the rear axle, in place of your regular driveshaft to the rear axle. Supposed to make a conversion lots simpler by freeing up the hood space, as well as simple to install. I'm sure it can be found using GOOGLE if anyone's interested.
Shhhh... Don't tell Thomas Edison that...

Besides that, I've worked with (read as "on" or "around") numerous electric forklifts and related equipment, and I don't think I've ever seen someone even remotely hurt by those batteries, which can run very high DC voltage.

****, they even charge them up in a basically closed room indoors, most times.

This is not to say that these practices are safe, but obviously OSHA doesn't have a problem with them...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,203 Posts
Gee, I don't recall seeing any forklifts traveling our roads at 70 MPH. (except on flatbed):rolleyes:
High speed crashes where battery containment and connections would be compromised with a forklift are pretty rare.

I don't like that if I should get in a wreck with a hybrid (or worse yet and homemade electric vehicle) that my care or my family members care will be delayed because the rescue worker has to make sure the hybrid isn't going to be a hazard to anyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,508 Posts
Gee, I don't recall seeing any forklifts traveling our roads at 70 MPH. (except on flatbed):rolleyes:
High speed crashes where battery containment and connections would be compromised with a forklift are pretty rare.

I don't like that if I should get in a wreck with a hybrid (or worse yet and homemade electric vehicle) that my care or my family members care will be delayed because the rescue worker has to make sure the hybrid isn't going to be a hazard to anyone.
Forklifts are VERY High AMPERAGE, but not very High Voltage.

Pending your designed "MAX" amperage motor draw, you could place fuses every so often along the series battery connections, so if/when you have a body short, you blow the fuse(s) and don't have the "full voltage" to contend with. :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Gee, I don't recall seeing any forklifts traveling our roads at 70 MPH. (except on flatbed):rolleyes:
High speed crashes where battery containment and connections would be compromised with a forklift are pretty rare.

I don't like that if I should get in a wreck with a hybrid (or worse yet and homemade electric vehicle) that my care or my family members care will be delayed because the rescue worker has to make sure the hybrid isn't going to be a hazard to anyone.
A very interesting point.

However, you are more than likely at a more significant risk of a gasoline problem than you are a battery problem. It will only be a risk if you are the path to ground. In the case of a battery you would have to be touching the negative terminal then touch the posative as well. This is very very very very unlikely.

Residential and commercial power is very different because the ground is actually tied to the earth that you are standing on. There in lies the risk of high voltage.

Remember, electricity is only a problem if you (your body) is the memeber that completes the circuit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,203 Posts
200 VDC + or - can find it's way to ground through a body. (You can grab a lead if you want to)
I agree that I wouldn't want to be hit by the tanker truck either.
 

·
PT Driver
Joined
·
2,674 Posts
I want to know what happened to this one!!!

:biggrin:http://cgi.ebay.com.my/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=370198519297
Judging by what I've found on Wikipedia, they are still around, just in very, very few numbers

In 1999, Dodge introduced the Caravan EPIC, a fully-electric mini-van. The EPIC was powered by 28 12-volt NiMH batteries and was capable of traveling up to 80 miles (130 km) on a single charge. The EPIC was sold as a fleet-only lease vehicle. Production of the EPIC was discontinued in 2001. Only a few hundred of these vehicles were produced and sold. After the leases expired they were returned and crushed. Approximately 10 vans remain in private hands today.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top