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Another and you'll see the cold dipstick marks. much lower than inches!
Seems like you haven't measured it yourself, you keep posting someone else's videos instead of stating your experiences.
 

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I did measure it myself and I have refilled it myself. I can't say what it was "before" because I'd have to go back a year when I damaged the fluid tray with a rock, so I kept leaving small puddles of ATF! I posted others videos because I was searching for info on how much it should be filled. The two videos I posted used Chrysler's own instructions and depth charts. I know that the engine running level is going to be higher than the stopped level because whilst running it pumps it out of the tray keeping fluid circulating through the gearbox and torque convertor.
 

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I did measure it myself and I have refilled it myself. I can't say what it was "before" because I'd have to go back a year when I damaged the fluid tray with a rock, so I kept leaving small puddles of ATF! I posted others videos because I was searching for info on how much it should be filled. The two videos I posted used Chrysler's own instructions and depth charts. I know that the engine running level is going to be higher than the stopped level because whilst running it pumps it out of the tray keeping fluid circulating through the gearbox and torque convertor.
Well, my two vehicles had factory filled ATF and both showed the same level.

So, in this instance I don't believe that guy. I know the guy in the first video is a very knowledgeable person and post many useful videos, but at this time I go by what I see in my own vehicles. Maybe Chrysler is not playing by they own rules, or maybe the cold temperature they use as a reference is not the actual transmission temperature on vehicles on those videos.
 

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I'll tell you the experience I've had with automatic transmissions, specifically caravan transmissions : I think the idea that they're as sensitive as an engine to fluid level is bunk. With these badly designed transmissions that most companies make you can't truly get an accurate measurement unless you have a lift or otherwise set the car level with the wheels off the ground so you can measure while operating at a specific speed in a specific gear like they say, and even then I'm doubtful because of the inevitable splashing and other fluid dynamics.

My suggestion is this : put about the amount that came out into it. It probably will be not quite enough and it won't always shift 1-2 cleanly, especially when very cold. Put more ATF in until it works right even in the coldest weather it'll see. Once it's consistent, add a bit more for operating margin (maybe half a quart) and leave it alone.
 

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Even the temperature vs level chart supplied by Chrysler shows the engine running, in park / neutral cold levels as 3.5 to 13 mm above the stop and the hot levels as 40 to 54 mm. That's what I keep my leaking pan to and have not had the slightest trouble with the tranny. Where did you get the levels you quote from?


and the chart on that page is labelled

Fig. 443: Fluid Level To Temperature Chart

Courtesy of CHRYSLER LLC

So what are we supposed to believe? Yours is the only reference I've seen to higher levels.
 

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Low temperature for the transmission fluid should be about 80F for any of it to show up on the dipstick, The operating temperature in the past, and still is, around 180F, not 200F. For most trips it likely closer to 170F.

What I would like you to do is let your vehicle sit 6 hours, or overnight, and measure the level of fluid in the transmission, stone "cold turkey", DON"T START THE ENGINE, NO HOW!! Forget about the Chrysler charts for this exercise. Throw them to the crusher. :)

You should be looking at around 95 mm /3.75 in. You can't fault this method of measurement, no how. It's absolute, and very useful when changing the transmission fluid in a vehicle.

Level surface.
 

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Yes, that's 95 mm Canadian. Good advice.

Actually, we use inches a lot especially with Carpenter work. 2"X4"X8' doesn't work well in Metric.
Translation:

2"= 1 1/2" = 38 mm (38.1 mm)
4"= 3 1/2" = 89 mm (88.9 mm)
8'= 8'

Actually, it works quite well! 😁
 

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Thanks Jeepman, I think you've hit the reason for the difference. The marks and instructions I've followed have been engine running. So that means that the ATF pump is running drawing it out and so leaving a smaller amount in the pan. The reasoning behind testing with the ATF pump running is because we don't KNOW how much fluid has drained back out of the gearbox and the torque convertor. So with it running we know that the pump is drawing fluid out of the pan to the gearbox and the torque convertor. The comment about not worrying about putting too much in does therefore make some sense. Basically got to make sure that it's not gonna draw up air through the filter. But we don't know the effect of too much fluid.
 

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Translation:

2"= 1 1/2" = 38 mm (38.1 mm)
4"= 3 1/2" = 89 mm (88.9 mm)
8'= 8'

Actually, it works quite well! 😁
Didn't work too well on the Columbia. :(
 

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The highest fluid level in the transmission pan is when the engine is stone cold and not running, say after it has been sitting overnight i.e. the 95 mm reading. Once the engine is started, fluid is drawn out of the transmission pan to the point of not even showing on the dipstick until the fluid gets warmed up some, say to 80F.
This is not true. The dipstick bottoms out on the pan. It's not possible for the transmission to pull the pan empty, nor would that even make sense. Fluid should be checked hot with the engine idling. Any other method will not produce meaningful results. You can check the atf with the oil pan dipstick, if it's above the full mark you're close enough, assuming the thing is fully warmed up. These distances correspond closely to the factory specs for the 62TE.
Or, you can just make a dipstick from on older engine oil dipstick using my template:
Rectangle Font Parallel Brand Number
 

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The dipstick does not bottom out on the bottom of the pan, unless somebody removes the stop that is in place there.
The marks on your dipstick are good but a little misleading. Operating temperature is 180F (34mm to 48mm) or a little less in reality. Hot is 200F ish.
Cold range is not really cold either, it's around 70F to 80F, the engine will likely need to be run for a few minutes to warm up the transmission fluid, to get a reading.

The Dipstick Stop


A 62TE Dipstick Revisit- Based on 80F and 180F temperatures

The "cold turkey" reading is the simplest, most fool proof way to read the transmission fluid level.
 
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