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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in an isle so it's very complicated to aquire things. My voyager is the 2003 and the engine has some damage (a part of the engine chasis exploded, leaking all the oil pretty fast).

So, there is available a 2006 engine, but I don't know how much trouble could be to adapt it to my 2003.

Help =/
 

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fix it if you can
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Welcome aboard,
It can be done, but is quite a bit of work: timing sets, cam gears, etc
details here:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome aboard,
It can be done, but is quite a bit of work: timing sets, cam gears, etc
details here:
What kind of troubles could it give if not all that work is done ?
 

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fix it if you can
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What kind of troubles could it give if not all that work is done ?
your van has what's known as SBEC PCM, 2006 has NGC PCM - the two use different timing gears (CAM and Crank) and are not interchangeable.
So if you simply put the '06 engine in your van, it won't start or run... (ignition timing won't work)
 

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don't attempt to change the computer, way way way too many variables and incompatibilities, 2003 and 2006 vans are VERY different electrically

changing parts of the engine to make it work with your computer is the simpler way
 

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2005 Town & Country 251k miles
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I think its possible. Use the 2006 long block then transfer all sensors and timing set from the 2003 onto the 2006 long block. The "new" engine will be 2006/2003 hybrid and compatible with the old PCM.
 

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fix it if you can
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So you basically are against it aswell.
It's not a matter of for or against.
You can't change PCM, so your only way to make this engine work is to take the timing cover, CAM gears, timing chain and flex plate off the old one and transfer to the new.
If any of those parts are wearing out, you'll need to order replacements. Add to that timing gasket, shop supplies and labor to do the part swap - that's in addition to pulling the engine and putting it back in again.
Only you can decide if it's worth the cost and trouble. (we have no idea who is doing the wrenching or what kind of space the person has to work with, not to mention what this engine would cost vs. an '01-'03 variant or what shape/mileage is the one coming out)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for your response. The "against it" was a bad use of words, english is not my native language, it should have been more a "so you wouldn't recommend it either"

The work labor is going to be pretty cheap (and at this point, suspiciously cheap), in my country that kind of work (the swaping, not the mixing) is usually 1/4 to 1/2 the price of the engine (depending on how expensive is the engine).

Apparently the guy who is going to do the work knows how to make it work but I have my doubts that he can really do it (now even more). Although working with the external things doesn't looks as too much hassle, it does when it comes to internal things like DIY Fan points.

I already gave the money to buy the engine, but it seems they haven't started yet pulling the 2006, so I was thinking of cancelling the whole thing.
 

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If labor in your country is cheap then I would go for it. Plenty of good mechanics out there who know how to modify parts to get them to work and its no trouble at all to swap parts around from one engine to another to maintain PCM compatibility. I have heard of old Chevrolet's in Cuba with Toyota steering wheels and crazy things like that where people use their ingenuity and tools to keep something on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It can vary from mechanic to mechanic, the starting price of swaping is $200usd and can be up to $500usd. He said is going to do the swaping (and inherently the mixing) for $200... he probably gained some bucks with the selling of the engine most problably (although it was not his, he was the one who was the intermediate of the selling).
 

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In the US a typical used engine swap with warranty is around $5000 including parts and labor. Not sure if the numbers you mentioned included the engine or if that was labor only.

Labor in the US is very expensive. Replacing a Honda J35 timing belt is around $1200 at a shop but the parts are only $200.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
The prices I said were labor only. The engine of these kind of voyagers can be from 300 dollars up to 1500 dollars. The most expensive ones are supposed to work flawlessly because they have several "new" pieces and is a basically an overhauled engine, but for $1500 dollars I can get a whole "new" voyager that works (around 1998 model). I was expecting the mixing could cost around 150-250 bucks more, but most probably it isnt having any cost because the mechanic could probably be winning around 250-350 dollars from the selling (the overprice of a usually used engine).

I just don't know how much hassle is to do the adapting, but it seems it's not as hard as to mix engine pieces
 

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I am not an expert on the differences between the 2003 and 2006 Chrysler 3.3L engines. My guess is the shortblocks are identical and the longblocks are also identical. If this is true then the only differences are external and therefore parts can be moved from the 2003 to the 2006 by any competent mechanic.
 
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