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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Update:

I swapped out the brackets for another set from the junkyard, starting with the passenger side. Instant improvement, so I did the driver side and saw improvement on there as well. Now I will see how they look after a semi long road trip when the van comes back Sunday, and I feel a lot better knowing it's working properly.

I'm beginning to doubt in the silicone caliper grease I had used. The stuff changed color and dried up while turning into relatively large flakes. If this is what happened in the slider bores then no wonder I had issues. The brackets I installed had whatever grease was in them, definitely felt a bit smoother then the ones I removed which I spent a lot of time cleaning.

This is the passenger side now after a short drive. Looks significantly better then it did before:
Automotive tire Fluid Road surface Water Asphalt
 

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If hi-temp brake grease isn't available, I use just plain old black moly grease on the guide pins. Both work great, but the black moly may react with the rubber in the pin boots and swell them up.

If you don't throw that rubber tip off the one guide pin per side, you may have issues with black moly especially. (Will seize with any grease, even OEM, just takes longer.) Personally, I chuck them off of every set of brakes I do. Customers that have uneven brake wear because of them never have issues again. Those things were added to reduce brake noise, but it seems they do that by reducing brake functionality when they stick. Much safer without them. Never had anyone complain of brake noise without them. You stop a lot faster when the whole pad is touching, not just the 1/3 of it that doesn't have the rubber tipped guide holding it open.



That lower guide pin is a disaster waiting to happen.



This happens in the bore and they get stuck.


Or they swell up like this and stick.

Amazing how easy it is to find pics of failures for those. Didn't even type "bad", "failed", or anything like that. Just "guide pin rubber". :p
 
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
If hi-temp brake grease isn't available, I use just plain old black moly grease on the guide pins. Both work great, but the black moly may react with the rubber in the pin boots and swell them up.

If you don't throw that rubber tip off the one guide pin per side, you may have issues with black moly especially. (Will seize with any grease, even OEM, just takes longer.) Personally, I chuck them off of every set of brakes I do. Customers that have uneven brake wear because of them never have issues again. Those things were added to reduce brake noise, but it seems they do that by reducing brake functionality when they stick. Much safer without them. Never had anyone complain of brake noise without them. You stop a lot faster when the whole pad is touching, not just the 1/3 of it that doesn't have the rubber tipped guide holding it open.



That lower guide pin is a disaster waiting to happen.



This happens in the bore and they get stuck.


Or they swell up like this and stick.

Amazing how easy it is to find pics of failures for those. Didn't even type "bad", "failed", or anything like that. Just "guide pin rubber". :p
Wow, I had no idea. I might go and chuck them off as well, might be worthwhile.
 

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Wow, I had no idea. I might go and chuck them off as well, might be worthwhile.
Sienile is throwing us for a loop here. :) I noticed the difference but didn't pay much attention as to which pin goes where and why. The available pin kits are variable too, some with a bushing, some without, some with a space for a bushing.

I'm guessing the pin with the rubber bushing (or space for a rubber bushing) always goes to the bottom, but why?

\

 
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Sienile is throwing us for a loop here. :) I noticed the difference but didn't pay much attention as to which pin goes where and why. The available pin kits are variable too, some with a bushing, some without, some with a space for a bushing.

I'm guessing the pin with the rubber bushing (or space for a rubber bushing) always goes to the bottom, but why?

Just remove the pin, no pin=no problem lol

I made sure the pins stayed in the hole they came from, cleaning one at a time so there wasn't any mix-up. My guess is the bottom one bears more or most of the weight when braking? I would think it would help with vibrations opposed to noise, but I'm no engineer.
 

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Just remove the pin, no pin=no problem lol

I made sure the pins stayed in the hole they came from, cleaning one at a time so there wasn't any mix-up. My guess is the bottom one bears more or most of the weight when braking? I would think it would help with vibrations opposed to noise, but I'm no engineer.
With the pads wanting to move upward, wouldn't think so. I put the shims at the top location on my rear brakes and left the bottoms without shims due to too tight a fit (potential binding). Next brake service I will use a grinder and add the remaining shims (lower). It's an experiment.

Over to Sienile to enlighten us on the rubber bushing's design intent.

Edit:
 
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Another update:

I did not remove the slider rubber piece but I took off the front calipers to check the pad wear, it's been ~150 kilometers of heavy city driving since I swapped the brackets. The pads all look smooth and shiny all the way around, so this means they all are applying equal pressure on the rotor. Before the inner part was black and the other part was shiny for both front outer pads.

This means all is well and working well for now. When I go to swap the tires for winter tires I will swap out the rubber boots on the front rotor sliders and remove the rubber damper (since I left the bracket completely alone when I did the bracket swap). In the process I will get better caliper grease and clean out everything, so that everything is complete and good for the winter season.

Thanks for everyone's help and insight on here, it really helps especially when I'm doing things for the first time!
 
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