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Can't say I've had much trouble with Chrysler engines to date and I tend to run them for many years and miles. I had an old 318 ci of the 1970s that used oil (typical leaky valve seals) but couldn't kill the engine. Their V6s have been great, one 3.8L used some oil, but that was typical too, those small tea cup oil filters and 5W-20 oil. :) Actually I used larger oil filters (Mopar FE00148) and 5W-30 oil, problem didn't go away. With 5W-40 it seemed to improve, according to the person that subsequently owned it. Those engines never let me down..
What oil performance related problems are you referring to?
 

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Not changing filters every oil change, running extra high miles on oil, remind me not to buy a used vehicle from this guy,
Clearly you don't under stand how engines, oil, and oil filters operate; it is okay to go through life being naive, but to then criticize others based upon your incomplete understanding of how things works is in rather bad form.
 

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Clearly you don't under stand how engines, oil, and oil filters operate; it is okay to go through life being naive, but to then criticize others based upon your incomplete understanding of how things works is in rather bad form.
Clearly I understand how engines and oil work.
Change the oil in a reasonable time and the filter and it will last longer.
I've seen your photos of the engine with high miles and late changes, it looks awfully neglected.
 

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Clearly I understand how engines and oil work.
Change the oil in a reasonable time and the filter and it will last longer.
I've seen your photos of the engine with high miles and late changes, it looks awfully neglected.
I'm going to call that statement a blatant lie; sorry dude, you're going to need to try harder.
 

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Can't say I've had much trouble with Chrysler engines to date and I tend to run them for many years and miles. I had an old 318 ci of the 1970s that used oil (typical leaky valve seals) but couldn't kill the engine. Their V6s have been great, one 3.8L used some oil, but that was typical too, those small tea cup oil filters and 5W-20 oil. :) Actually I used larger oil filters (Mopar FE00148) and 5W-30 oil, problem didn't go away. With 5W-40 it seemed to improve, according to the person that subsequently owned it. Those engines never let me down..
What oil performance related problems are you referring to?
Wish I had that luck, blew two 1970's 360's in the 70K mile range from bad crankshafts.
 

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The pictures speak for themselves, I don't need to say any more.
You can share with us where these fictitious pictures are located. You need to say a lot more to back up bogus claims.
 
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Dang it, shipo! You ran off another one. :p
 

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2001 T&C 3.8L 182,000 miles
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Discussion Starter · #89 · (Edited)
I made a post on reddit about 7,000-10,000-mile synthetic oil changes and the people went crazy saying I was insane and not have a license etc. and should die, even though I specified I did mostly highway miles. 1 person on reddit agreed with me but had negative thumbs down. WOW people are just fantastic. Obviously, some cars require shorter oil changes because of their design but some people even said they change their oil every 3,000 miles full synthetic. That is too soon for most average drivers. I can somewhat agree on some cars 5,000 miles but I think 3,000 miles is too soon for synthetic. Saying it is madatory is probably and over staement but to each there own. They can do what they want. I don’t need my car to last 1,000,000 miles because the rest of the van would be too costly to fix. I am happy with 300,000 even 400,000 miles. I have a Mitsubishi with a cvt and the oil is black at 3,000 miles but I change it at 5,000 miles. That car uses VVT and 0w20 and is a large SUV. S0 the engine works a bit harder do to the 2.4L displacement. That owner’s manual states to not pass 5,000 miles. The Mitsubishi is prone to low speed preignition due to the weight of the suv and small engine with a CVT transmission. I assume the newer grand caravan, pacific as and voyagers tolerate 7000 to 10,000 miles fine on synthetic oil.
 

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If the weight of the oil were correct, using a synthetic diesel oil for 8k miles would be fine. I'm a bit leery on the 5w40 weight mentioned in the OP. 5w30, okay, in other cars it runs that weight. But 5w40 is some thick stuff. You could end up starving lifters in cold weather.
 
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If the weight of the oil were correct, using a synthetic diesel oil for 8k miles would be fine. I'm a bit leery on the 5w40 weight mentioned in the OP. 5w30, okay, in other cars it runs that weight. But 5w40 is some thick stuff. You could end up starving lifters in cold weather.

No, 5W-40 is thick but will flow well at operating temperature. The 5W-40 oil will flow way better at operating temperature than any oil at -18C/0F and warming up for the next 5 minutes or so, while the bypass valve in the oil filter is in bypass mode. Imagine that. Ever drain oil out of an engine at -18C/0F? Don't bother, too slow, doesn't all drain out. :)

Have fun with this video keeping in mind that a 5W-30 PAO synthetic oil (Group IV. base oil) has a cold Pour Point of -50C/-58F or so, whereas a 5W-30 full synthetic oil (Group III base petroleum oil) has a Pour Point of -36C/-33F or so.

Castrol Edge vs AMSOIL 5W-30 Cold Flow Challenge
 

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I'm not concerned about operating temp. I'm worried about cold starts. Trying to pump that molasses through those little holes in the head isn't happening with a stone cold block in below freezing temps.
 

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I'm not concerned about operating temp. I'm worried about cold starts. Trying to pump that molasses through those little holes in the head isn't happening with a stone cold block in below freezing temps.
5W is 5W cold regardless of the second number, the 30 or 40 comes later, via VI improvers, as the oil gets hot. Both start out as a 5W oil and are modified by the VI improvers as the oil temperature goes up.
What Does the "5W-40" in Motor Oil Mean?
Oil manufacturers introduce additives to a thin base oil that cause a 5W-40 oil to act like a single-grade oil with a five rating when cold, but then as the oil heats up it acts like a single-grade oil with a 40 rating.
Oils with two numbers, such as 5W-40, are multi-grade oils; they exhibit the characteristics of an oil with a viscosity rating of 5 at zero degrees Fahrenheit and the characteristics of an oil with a viscosity rating of 40 at 212 degrees Fahrenheit.
Stated another way:
Viscosity is notated using the common classification “XW-XX”. The number preceding the “W” (winter) rates the oil’s flow (viscosity) at zero degrees Fahrenheit (-17.8 degrees Celsius). The lower the number, the less the oil thickens in cold weather.
The numbers after the “XW” indicate viscosity at 100 degrees Celsius and represent the oil’s resistance to thinning at high temperatures.
Oil viscosity and oil grades
A Simple Explanation of Viscosity Index Improvers
VI improvers (also known as viscosity modifiers) are additives that increase the viscosity of the fluid throughout its useful temperature range.
So, at what temperature does a 5W-40 oil become a 30 weight oil? Well up the temperature scale, apparently, maybe never reaches 40 if it doesn't get warm enough.
 

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I made a post on reddit about 7,000-10,000-mile synthetic oil changes and the people went crazy saying I was insane and not have a license etc. and should die, even though I specified I did mostly highway miles. 1 person on reddit agreed with me but had negative thumbs down. WOW people are just fantastic. Obviously, some cars require shorter oil changes because of their design but some people even said they change their oil every 3,000 miles full synthetic. That is too soon for most average drivers. I can somewhat agree on some cars 5,000 miles but I think 3,000 miles is too soon for synthetic. Saying it is madatory is probably and over staement but to each there own. They can do what they want. I don’t need my car to last 1,000,000 miles because the rest of the van would be too costly to fix. I am happy with 300,000 even 400,000 miles. I have a Mitsubishi with a cvt and the oil is black at 3,000 miles but I change it at 5,000 miles. That car uses VVT and 0w20 and is a large SUV. S0 the engine works a bit harder do to the 2.4L displacement. That owner’s manual states to not pass 5,000 miles. The Mitsubishi is prone to low speed preignition due to the weight of the suv and small engine with a CVT transmission. I assume the newer grand caravan, pacific as and voyagers tolerate 7000 to 10,000 miles fine on synthetic oil.
After heavy testing on our modded 2.7L V6, that was long due for a at 3k miles on full synthetic.
In reality, most full synthetics that everyone swears by were toasted just over 1500 miles.
I recall Redline, Amsoil, Royal Purple, and Mobil 1 were all degraded and loaded with contaminants at the 1500 mile mark. My initial gauge was smell/color, analysis confirmed that they were in fact broken down to the point of losing lubricity.
Oddly, it's also what steered me on Valvoline Synpower at the time. It was the only synthetic that could actually go 3k miles in that engine without being shot.

Mind you, all oils were tested with a Mopar oil filter. Each were given 3 changes to ensure results. That engine was living proof that extended changes are in fact bunk for some engines. It also made confirmed my thoughts that when your oil is black and has a burnt smell, it probably should have been changed a long time ago.

I ended up sticking with Valvoline Synpower in that car for the rest of it's time with us. In the 275k miles we drove/abused that car it never had any oil related issues, nor did it ever use any oil between oil changes.

Been trying to dig through our records to find the reports from it as we tested numerous oils before finally settling on one, unfortunately coming up empty handed.

The newer GCs and Pacificas have also proven extended changes are bunk as most with valvetrain issues are those running 8k+ on changes, meanwhile those running a proper 4-5k interval seem to have no issues.
 
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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
After heavy testing on our modded 2.7L V6, that was long due for a at 3k miles on full synthetic.
In reality, most full synthetics that everyone swears by were toasted just over 1500 miles.
I recall Redline, Amsoil, Royal Purple, and Mobil 1 were all degraded and loaded with contaminants at the 1500 mile mark. My initial gauge was smell/color, analysis confirmed that they were in fact broken down to the point of losing lubricity.
Oddly, it's also what steered me on Valvoline Synpower at the time. It was the only synthetic that could actually go 3k miles in that engine without being shot.

Mind you, all oils were tested with a Mopar oil filter. Each were given 3 changes to ensure results. That engine was living proof that extended changes are in fact bunk for some engines. It also made confirmed my thoughts that when your oil is black and has a burnt smell, it probably should have been changed a long time ago.

I ended up sticking with Valvoline Synpower in that car for the rest of it's time with us. In the 275k miles we drove/abused that car it never had any oil related issues, nor did it ever use any oil between oil changes.

Been trying to dig through our records to find the reports from it as we tested numerous oils before finally settling on one, unfortunately coming up empty handed.

The newer GCs and Pacificas have also proven extended changes are bunk as most with valvetrain issues are those running 8k+ on changes, meanwhile those running a proper 4-5k interval seem to have no issues.
I remeber the 2.7 when it first came out. hey were notorious for engine sludge due to many issues. Leaking antifreeze slowly into oil, narrow oil journals, bad pvc etc. The later model ones were a lot better. My aunt has a doge magnum that went out at 400,000 miles. She did only use synthetic oil and replaced the timing chain and water pump when it started leaking. That engine reminds me of the newer Eco boost engines by Ford Lincoln and mazda and sure enough coolant got into the oil pan and sludge the engine on many models. I don’t remember if the manufacture for the intrepid and Sebring 2.7 recommended synthetic, but conventional oil was not a good choice on that engine that is extremely sensitive to maintenance. That engine was too sensitive but can last with abuse with early proper maintenance. I don’t know much about the 3.7 4.7 and 5.7 engines. I heard of valve seats droping and headgaskets going bad requireming a full rebuild
 

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5.7 is a totally different beast to the 3.7 and 4.7. The 3.7/4.7 is pretty crappy and is prone to issues. 5.7s get Hemi lifter tick, but that's about it. I'm doing a 3.7 in a Nitro that has bottom end knock, which is probably the 5th I've done for such reasons. 4.7 is just as bad about it.

That 2.7 had a problematic valvetrain that could not be serviced. (Manual says it can, but there's a difference between installing something and actually having it work right after install.) If you ever had valve noise, replace the entire rocker assembly on that side. Replacing the individual lifters is always a waste of money.
 

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When I worked at the shop, I replaced two Intrepid 2.7s with reman crate engines. The one actually drove in with two broken connecting rods.:oops: The other came in for paint work, and the engine lunched itself in the parking lot when the timing chain tensioner let go.:LOL: The first one I did blew up again after I stopped working there and the warranty on the reman had likely expired.

JUNK.
 

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I did lifters on the same one twice before getting a rocker assembly. I told the boss it wasn't going to work, but he insisted. Even with the special tool and soaking the lifters overnight, the majority of them collapsed. Second time all the same positions collapsed. There was likely some issue we couldn't see with the rocker arms. For anyone reading this and confused how a rocker issue would cause lifters to collapse, the 2.7 uses weird rocker arms that have the lifters built in to the arms. A truly horrendous design.
 

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Meanwhile, my 2.7L had 287k miles on it when we sold it. We bought it at 12k, the oil was changed religiously, and it got the ever loving **** beat out of it daily.

The design was fine overall, it was the dumbass owners who couldn't be bothered to maintain them that led to the sludge issues.

Hmm, crazy, you maintain your vehicle and it has less issues, who'd have thought?
 
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