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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2006 chrysler town and country...

AC compressor was destroyed about a month ago or so(see attached, that thing was mangled). I replaced the Compressor, condensor, and dryer, ran a vacuum pump on it, and hoped for the best...

Been thru a bit of a saga trying to get my van put together and up and running(see my prev threads if for some reason you're interested), but today I finally got around to taking it to the shop to get the refrigerant serviced back up so I can have working AC again...

So the shop charges it back up, and still no AC. Seems there's something else ****ed up on the van's AC system preventing it from working. I'm getting ready to move across the country for work so I don't got time or desire to push with it any further right now, so opted not to have the shop work it. Just going to drive it as is and maybe break back into it later.

The dude who was doing the refrigerant and then trying what he could to figure out why there was no cold air initially said he thought the AC compressor did kick on briefly(sounded like mere seconds), but then went off and could not get it to come back on again. He ran the tester or whatever you call it that reads codes from your vehicle/engine and saw no codes that would indicate anything else being amiss that would cause compressor not to engage.

He did mention several possibilites, but he was just winging out ideas. Everything from orifice tube(believe chrysler town and country has an expansion valve) being bad or having blockage, wiring(but if compressor turned on initially even for a second or two, seems wiring would not be the issue), and he mentioned lo and hi pressure sensors possibly being bad(does a 06 chrysler town and country have those?).

He did confirm there were no leaks, pressures were reading what they should(but that the pressures did not move up/down at all when ac on van was turned on).

I did opt to push my luck and NOT mess around with the expansion valve given its location and the trouble I'd be looking at if a bolt got stripped or stuck, did not replace it or flush it or evaporator. The wiring visibly looked fine when I was replacing the compressor, and again since he said he thought it did turn on initially, I wouldn't think it was that. Seems most likely scenario is i have a blockage in the AC system prevent refrigerant from getting to compressor.

Curious if anyone had any other/better ideas? Just for future reference, I won't be digging into it for a good while.

FYI, the black stuff all over the compressor is melted insulation from the wire haress going to the passenger fan. Seems when compressor went bad it overheated and fried that wire(assuming it was the compressor, haha don't know what else might have done it). I didn't notice any damage whatsoever at any other location on any other wiring in the area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Does the compressor clutch activate when the AC is called for?
No.

The technician initially told me that it did, but from what he described it sounded as though it almost immediately dis-engaged, like it activated for just a few secs and that was it. Had me start up my car and turn the AC on several more times as he was lookin over things and the clutch never activated again.
 

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No.

The technician initially told me that it did, but from what he described it sounded as though it almost immediately dis-engaged, like it activated for just a few secs and that was it. Had me start up my car and turn the AC on several more times as he was lookin over things and the clutch never activated again.
3 rd
No.

The technician initially told me that it did, but from what he described it sounded as though it almost immediately dis-engaged, like it activated for just a few secs and that was it. Had me start up my car and turn the AC on several more times as he was lookin over things and the clutch never activated again.
3rd gen replaced compressor put in proper oil.got a charge hose and a propane tank filled system with propane.not going to leave it like that but you can sniff leaks and cost a lot less then freon.ac is super cold.The propane is a good trouble shooting tool.Found a bad o ring

At the fire wall where it enters the evaporator.Replaced o ring.Now i can recharge with r134a. Check internet about using propane butane mixture to troubleshoot system. Caution be careful as. Propane and butane are flammable.The skunk oil in both gasses make it easy to find leaks.i think some of the super freon mixtures have propane and or butane mixed with freon.Never use that leak sealer quick fix stuff an o rink kit was only $7.good luck be sure to keep a fire extinguisher close during trouble shooting. This procedure is only for troubleshooting only.
 

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My AC clutch slipped to get hot and sling molten plastic all around like yours, on a 108F day about 10 years ago. I don't know if the pressure switch is just a low disable or a "binary" type with low + high cut-off (could research the PN). If I found the later (forget), it was probably too high a setting to prevent another clutch slippage, so as insurance I put a tiny pressure relief valve (250 psig?) in a port on the rebuilt compressor. Might be illegal per EPA, but I'm using HC refrigerant (Duracool) which venting is no worse for the planet than a cow-fart. I opted for rebuilt compressor w/ clutch since little more cost than just a clutch. But, turned out a bad choice. The rebuilt one made a funny noise from the start, though cooled OK but that was near end-of-summer. By early next summer, it was barely cooling and perhaps louder. I took it apart and found they had put two thin flapper plates (stuck together) on one side. The other side had the backer plate serving as a flapper, per "witness marks" left by the port. Explained how it worked at all. I re-assembled correctly, using the center section from my OE compressor since the rebuilt's swash plate had more play. Worked fine since. If you fear opening one, I think it is almost impossible to reassemble incorrectly, given the locating pins and matching holes in the plates, except what these gomer rebuilders did (place in Jackson, TN), and there are youtubes.

You can wait until next spring to address, though AC parts can be much cheaper on ebay in winter (bought new Sanden compressors for my Mopar classics for $50). It should be fairly simple to determine what is preventing the AC clutch from engaging. First, manually apply 12 VDC with jumper wires to insure the clutch works. If the gap is too large (thickness of matchbook cover, ~20 mil), it may not engage even with spec coil current. You can add shim washers to the shaft to adjust. Go upstream in schematic and see if the climate box is sending 12 VDC. In older cars, the pressure switch and other enablers (anti-ice switch on evaporator) are either directly in series with the clutch wires or on the coil circuitry of its relay (check that too, usually jumper 30 to 87 in relay base to force clutch on). Those sensors today may feed to the climate box, especially if your has digital control (ATC in my 2002 year). Anybody with a free Harbor Freight multimeter and basic knowledge (watch youtubes if not) can trouble-shoot it. I found pdf manuals for my 2002 online free (Russian site, might be gone now). If you remove the clutch, know that the bolt is left-hand threaded (cw to unscrew) and you need an impact wrench so the shaft doesn't just spin as you turn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
3 rd

3rd gen replaced compressor put in proper oil.got a charge hose and a propane tank filled system with propane.not going to leave it like that but you can sniff leaks and cost a lot less then freon.ac is super cold.The propane is a good trouble shooting tool.Found a bad o ring

At the fire wall where it enters the evaporator.Replaced o ring.Now i can recharge with r134a. Check internet about using propane butane mixture to troubleshoot system. Caution be careful as. Propane and butane are flammable.The skunk oil in both gasses make it easy to find leaks.i think some of the super freon mixtures have propane and or butane mixed with freon.Never use that leak sealer quick fix stuff an o rink kit was only $7.good luck be sure to keep a fire extinguisher close during trouble shooting. This procedure is only for troubleshooting only.
If there was a leak, surely the technician that recharged the refigerant would have seen that as he was servicing it or right after as he was testing the AC system. Plus, correct me if I'm wrong but a leak would only cause a compressor not to kick on at all if the system was completely empty of refrigerant. My van was fully serviced and still nothin on the compressor.

You can wait until next spring to address, though AC parts can be much cheaper on ebay in winter (bought new Sanden compressors for my Mopar classics for $50). It should be fairly simple to determine what is preventing the AC clutch from engaging. First, manually apply 12 VDC with jumper wires to insure the clutch works. If the gap is too large (thickness of matchbook cover, ~20 mil), it may not engage even with spec coil current. You can add shim washers to the shaft to adjust. Go upstream in schematic and see if the climate box is sending 12 VDC. In older cars, the pressure switch and other enablers (anti-ice switch on evaporator) are either directly in series with the clutch wires or on the coil circuitry of its relay (check that too, usually jumper 30 to 87 in relay base to force clutch on). Those sensors today may feed to the climate box, especially if your has digital control (ATC in my 2002 year). Anybody with a free Harbor Freight multimeter and basic knowledge (watch youtubes if not) can trouble-shoot it. I found pdf manuals for my 2002 online free (Russian site, might be gone now). If you remove the clutch, know that the bolt is left-hand threaded (cw to unscrew) and you need an impact wrench so the shaft doesn't just spin as you turn.
YIKES, that all sounds FARRRRRR more complex and complicated than what I was thinkin. Thought itd be as simple as hooking multimeter up to the connector and seein what it's readin
 

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A quick test is to connect the wires to the pressure switch together to see if compressor kicks in.If charges is to low, the switch will read no continuity with a meter.Needs to be charged and might need new o rings to fix a leak.Also the bcm controls the compressor relay coil.Even in the winter switch to defrost and the compressor will turn on.The body control module , b c m can be repaired it has solder in fuses.Relay driver circuit.The horn driver in mine shorted did a work around.I think these b c m 's could use surge protection. Sorry about ,,the rabbit trail but stuff could get complicated real quick. Going to add a ground wire and surge protection to the b c m in the future.
Every once in a while something weird happens.sun goes down van off ,lights turn on.
For its own good I installed a battery disconnect switch on the negative battery terminal.Ecm memory and radio preset.A second battery with isolator will be installed.
Gets tricky when you disconnect ground.Battery is now inside the van behind drivers seat. For trouble shooting a vacuum pump with guage can be used to see if it holds vaccum over night.Be very careful if you use propane to trouble shoot an ac system.Have a fire extinguisher close.Does make it easy to find leaks. sniff around r134a is to expensive to troubleshoot with,avoid leak sealer all in one, can ruin parts. System can be flushed with isopropyl alcohol.If lines are disconnected from compressor. New oil if needed in compressor.A work around can be done if bcm is at fault for compressor not working.All you need is 12 volts on the compressor coil and a switch.
 
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