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I'm picking up a 2007 Grand Caravan C/V this weekend, but first I need to install a replacement right taillamp assembly because the seller took it off to replace a damaged one on another of his fleet vans.

The liftgate switch, the soft rubbery piece above the license plate doesn't work, and I've sprayed rust penetrant into the key cylinder but it is so rusted that the key doesn't go in all the way. Is there an internal release to get the liftgate open?
 

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Not sure of c/v, but on passenger versions there is an internal handle (toward RH side) with a round plug - the plug pulls out and the handle can be removed if you need more room to reach the linkage.
 

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Not trying to be 'master of the obvious', but...
If the power door locks are not unlocked, it seems like the lift gate release (outside electrical buttons) are not working. Try clicking the power door locks "unlock" twice, like a double tap, either the remote FOB or the door switch.

Let us know how it goes or what you do to fix your mini, we love a happy ending.
Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What happened here?

How did you get the liftgate open?
All I did was take the little plug out of the inner panel, which is just above where the liftgate actuator motor is, and used a pair of needle nose pliers to reach in and grab the linkage coming from the lock cylinder going down to the liftgate latch assembly.I got the liftgate open, pulled off the inner panel, checked all of the electrical pigtails for power, and made sure that the outer switch was operable.

Now I can open the hatch from the outside giving that switch a squeeze, but now I need to replace the lock cylinder because the original was too rusted.
 

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Thanks for the update.
So you found a bad connection or a bad switch?
I figured it had to have been recently opened for the previous owner to *claim the tail light.

Locks are really pretty easy and you can likely disassemble that one and get it back together again in an hour. You'll also have the advantage of it still being keyed to the ignition key.
On that note, if you were planning on bringing the new cylinder to a lock smith to have the ignition key fitted, then simply remove the lock cylinder and bring it to them and save yourself the dollar for the cylinder. They can certainly clean and lubricate/repair that one. There is nothing in there to 'rust' as it should be corrosion resistant brass and such.

Folks spraying oil and FluidFilm® in the locks will attract dust and pocket lint. Oil like WD-40 then creates a 'cementation' in the lock. Only lubricate a lock with an approved dry lock lubricant.

Rock auto and even Amazon likely has a replacement 'pair' of tail lights for less than a hundred CAD.


Cheers!
Say Mojo1965, if you do clean your own lock, watch a video on YouTube and afterwards let us know how it went.
 

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Folks spraying oil and FluidFilm® in the locks will attract dust and pocket lint. Oil like WD-40 then creates a 'cementation' in the lock. Only lubricate a lock with an approved dry lock lubricant.
Does dry lubricant creep and penetrate?

Does FLUID FILM attract dirt? Because FLUID FILM remains wet, it will get an initial dusting upon application, but because it contains no solvents and will not become sticky, it will not gum up or create a build up of dirt.
FLUID FILM works very well in locks. FLUID FILM will provide long term lubrication in a lock assembly. In cold weather applications, FLUID FILM will keep locks from freezing, and since FLUID FILM contains no solvent, it will not get gummy or create a build-up of dirt. Do not over-apply; a light application is all that is necessary.
 

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Does dry lubricant creep and penetrate?
I've got a lock that is on my boat trailer spare tire. I'll try the wonder of Fluid Film on it and report my findings. I'm not askeered...
FluidFilm works great on the trailer boat winch and I love it on the leaf springs and select points on the brakes.

My experience so far has been it is like temperature tolerant bacon grease. It never really dries, repels water, inhibits rust, goes everywhere as it kreeps. I sprayed the winch about a year ago, it is likely time for reapplication. I am curious now, so I gotta go outside and look.

I also had a thought just yesterday after cutting the lawn, that I need to clean up under the deck and apply a coat of FF to the mower to evaluate that usage.

Jeepman, I am a FluidFilm fan thanks to you. I sent cans to my family for them to experience.
I'm considering getting a 5 gallon pail and bathe in it...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the update.
So you found a bad connection or a bad switch?
I figured it had to have been recently opened for the previous owner to *claim the tail light.

Locks are really pretty easy and you can likely disassemble that one and get it back together again in an hour. You'll also have the advantage of it still being keyed to the ignition key.
On that note, if you were planning on bringing the new cylinder to a lock smith to have the ignition key fitted, then simply remove the lock cylinder and bring it to them and save yourself the dollar for the cylinder. They can certainly clean and lubricate/repair that one. There is nothing in there to 'rust' as it should be corrosion resistant brass and such.

Folks spraying oil and FluidFilm® in the locks will attract dust and pocket lint. Oil like WD-40 then creates a 'cementation' in the lock. Only lubricate a lock with an approved dry lock lubricant.

Rock auto and even Amazon likely has a replacement 'pair' of tail lights for less than a hundred CAD.


Cheers!
Say Mojo1965, if you do clean your own lock, watch a video on YouTube and afterwards let us know how it went.
Thanks FabricGATOR

Now I've got to get a new lock cylinder. No matter how much I try I can't get it loose. And as far as I can see the dealer is the only place to get a replacement. And I'd have to get it keyed to my original key
 

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Thanks FabricGATOR

Now I've got to get a new lock cylinder. No matter how much I try I can't get it loose. And as far as I can see the dealer is the only place to get a replacement. And I'd have to get it keyed to my original key
Well that is what I was thinking. Seeing as aside from just opening your check book and letting the stealership do everything required, you are going to have to remove the cylinder.

At that point, simply bring it to a locksmith and drop it off with a spare ignition key. He should be able to unstuck it. Unless you were going to try to change the tumblers yourself, you'd likely be acquiring her services anyway.

Yes, if you destroy the cylinder removing it from your rear hatch door, you'll have to get a new cylinder too.
Junk yard and then to the locksmith.... Make a Saturday of it.
 
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