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My 2007 T/ C 3.3 Litre original engine and transmission keeps going strong at 235,000 miles. The only I have done is use Shell Rotella synthetic oil and keep dropping the tranny pan and changing fluid. Plugs and wires a few times. Ruining great!
 

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Welcome,

235,000 miles are not really a lot of miles by my stds.

But glad it is still working fine, especially after droping transmission pan more than once.
 

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Keep on trucking. :) You're doing well.

Spinning your wheels in the sand doesn't count LEVY. :) Ooops, up here it's snow.
 

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how would changing tranny fluid effect anything. I suck a quart out of my tranny every time I change oil for detergent sake, 2006
 

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Changing ATF doesn't affect anything.
Changing ATF DOES affect the life and reliability of ANY automatic transmission. Gets rid of wear particle, renews additives and lubricates better. The only transmission whose fluid should not be changed is one with extremely high mileage when the fluid is dirty and burnt.
 

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Changing ATF DOES affect the life and reliability of ANY automatic transmission. Gets rid of wear particle, renews additives and lubricates better. The only transmission whose fluid should not be changed is one with extremely high mileage when the fluid is dirty and burnt.
I never change ATF on any of my vehicles, no transmission failure so far.
 

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Changing ATF DOES affect the life and reliability of ANY automatic transmission. Gets rid of wear particle, renews additives and lubricates better. The only transmission whose fluid should not be changed is one with extremely high mileage when the fluid is dirty and burnt.
Most new automatic transmissions do not have drains in their torque converters so when you replace the transmission fluid, the fluid that you drop from the pan has not completely changed the fluid and you have just mixed new with old ATF. If you don’t completely drain all the ATF you could be causing problems to happen. Let me use an example to illustrate my point. Years ago I bought a Dodge Polara for my girlfriend (now wife) to use. I was putting oil in the 383 engine more than I wanted to so I decided to change the valve cover gaskets because I could see oil leaking from them. Well when I took the covers off I could see that this engine had not been properly maintained. There was sludge everywhere. So I cleaned out the covers and got rid of all the sludge that I could reach on the head. I used a shop vac and sucked up all the stuff that I had dislodged. I put new gaskets on and it stopped the oil from leaking. Problem solved right? About a week after the fix I borrowed her car to go help a friend and started hearing a tapping sound. The oil pressure was almost zero so my first thought was that maybe oil had drained out. I stopped at the first gas station and bought five quarts of oil and put it in the engine. Oil pressure improved very little and the lifters were still tapping so I drove the car to my dad’s and put it in his garage. After taking out the drain plug lots of junk came plopping out. Sludge on the side of the engine block had gotten cleaned off by the new oil and into the oil pan and oil pickup it went. The 383 has an external oil pump so I pulled it off and blew air into the pickup and also cleaned the pump. I changed the oil twice and it seemed to fix it. I also sold the car a short time later but the guy who bought it had it for quite some time. One school of thought is if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. Having said all that I just had a 99 3.3 Caravan given to me and first thing I did was flush out the trans. Drain the fluid, put in fresh and disconnect the trans line and run the car to flush out the converter. The reason I got the van for free was because they thought the transmission was dying. I have been using it since August. I drove the van home from PA and went over 100 miles and it shifted perfectly every time. If you are going to change the ATF make sure you change it all so that means flush out the torque converter.
 

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Most new automatic transmissions do not have drains in their torque converters so when you replace the transmission fluid, the fluid that you drop from the pan has not completely changed the fluid and you have just mixed new with old ATF. If you don’t completely drain all the ATF you could be causing problems to happen. Let me use an example to illustrate my point. Years ago I bought a Dodge Polara for my girlfriend (now wife) to use. I was putting oil in the 383 engine more than I wanted to so I decided to change the valve cover gaskets because I could see oil leaking from them. Well when I took the covers off I could see that this engine had not been properly maintained. There was sludge everywhere. So I cleaned out
You did the right thing. And even getting all the of the sludge out of that engine too. Neglect on an engine is very BAD. Our family had a passed down 1987 Chrysler New Yorker. Found out the relative had not changed the engine oil in 5 years. YES, 5 years. Needless to say, we learned that AFTER the fact when the engine overheated and BLEW. Removing the valve covers, it was more than just a gooey sludge, it was sludge and oil like concrete in there. I do believe you had saved that 383cid engine actually. Smart move doing all of that clean up.
 

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Thanks.
Dad use to say oil is the life blood of an engine, make sure you check it and change it on a regular basis. If you take care of your car, it will take care of you.
 
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