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Could use a cold chisel and a hammer to split the nut. They split pretty easily. Done it that way many times in my wrecking yard days 45/50 years ago.
 

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And what are the differences in clamping forces on wheels (clean dry vs clean oiled) when you are dealing with a tapered head as opposed to a flat head as described in the trucking article?
 

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A former co-worker had a chart on bolt torques used by Rocketdyne in LA. They make rocket engines, like the giant F-1 on the Saturn V, so bolt torqueing is meticulous. It said that adding oil to the threads does not change the torque to resulting tension relationship, it just makes the results more consistent. Adding a high-pressure dry lubricant like molybdenum-disulfide ("moly") to the threads doubles the resulting tension (so best not to use it). Some wheel bearing greases have moly. I vaguely recall it said that lubing the head/washer of the bolt can double the tension, so lube only the threads, and best to use a thinner oil, even WD-40. I wouldn't use silicone lubricant, since they gave no data. Not applicable to wheel studs, but never fill a blind hole with oil, as that can cause you to hit the torque early from hydro-lock which will later leak off to leave the bolt loose.
I disagree.

Don't know where your co-worker got that information from. What I do know is Pantex, in Texas uses different torque values when torquing wet vs dry, as a matter of fact, if a bolt was supposed to be torqued dry, it should not be torqued wet.
 

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Lug nuts should never be lubed because it interferes with torqueing the nuts properly. When lug nuts work loose it is almost always because of lube on the threads.
It's actually lube on the contact point on the hub.....not the threads.
You can lube the threads just fine.
If the lube gets on the hub or base of the lug nut this can effect torque application on the bolts.
 

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Nice looking instructions from a Porsche manual:
Font Parallel Paper Paper product Document


I'm not up to using anti seize around the wheels except for metal to metal contact areas on brakes, back side of brake pads, and the center hole contact area for the wheel.

A light lubricant like Fluid Film on the threads and on the back of the wheel (mating surface). Anything heavier can cause a hydraulic barrier and subsequent loosening of nuts, so they say..

Years back they use to say to lubricate the studs but today, the use of impact wrenches and spray application everywhere, including the seats, has lead to, I believe, no lubricant at all. Besides that, the vehicle manufacturers don't want to have to provide a can of spray lubricant with their wheel change kit..:) Cheapskates!

New bolts and old bolts have different torque characteristics, but won't get into that now.
 
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Exactly, you can only assume (guess) that one drop of "used" oil equals to 20% of torque.
Sorry if I was unclear. For motor oil on wheel studs, I do NOT adjust the torque.

The 20% reduction is for bolts using the particular anti-seize that I use, and came from an engineering reference source that listed a number of lubricants and the torque reduction required.
 

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I'm a member of that forum (haven't been active the last year or two, because life). I'm pretty sure that's where I picked up the motor oil on wheel studs tip. That forum has lots of active engineers of all types, and at least a couple of tribologists
Tribology = interesting. Never heard of such. Thanks for something new.
Tribology is the science and engineering of interacting surfaces in relative motion. It includes the study and application of the principles of friction, lubrication, and wear. Tribology is highly interdisciplinary, drawing on many academic fields, including physics, chemistry, materials science, mathematics, biology, and engineering. People who work in the field of tribology are referred to as tribologists.[1]

The fundamental objects of study in tribology are tribosystems, which are physical systems of contacting surfaces. In lubricated tribosystems, contact stress can create tribofilms. Subfields of tribology include biotribology, nanotribology, space tribology, and tribotronics.
The applied torque vs tension/clamping force for a fastener can vary considerably, depending on the condition of the fastener. Slightly rusty versus new = 30% Unbelievable! 39 minimum required/48 new (slightly lubed by manufacturing)/15 (dry, slightly rusty)/ 53 (totally lubed). Well, I guess so, the guy seems to know what he is doing (a larger bolt but .... indicative?)
Applied Bolting - Torque isn't Tension

What's with this stud?
The new 2019 Silverado and Sierra use wheels studs that have a yellow coating on the lower portion of the stud threads to prevent corrosion of the threads.
Automotive lighting Auto part Engineering Metal Nozzle


The yellow isn't a lubricant, so they say, but they are obviously very concerned about a corrosion damaged stud in the clamping zone. Coatings don't tend to stand up to the heat, do they? Maybe so in this case.

Then, there's the coated bolts, where the nut may be tapped larger to accommodate the coating. I guess we need a Tribologist. :)

Bolt Lubricant and Torque: A Comprehensive Guide
 
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