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Latent car nut
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey gang,

I'm posting here about a non-Chrysler issue, however, it is an issue which I believe might be relevant for us minivan owners. So, here goes...

The battery in my TL is on it's last legs (no idea how old it is, it was in the car when I bought it 25 months ago); my plan all along has been to throw a new AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat) Group 24F battery into it and call it a day. Prior to pulling the trigger on the new battery, I thought I'd do a little research, and said research has given me pause.
  • Per my research, relatively late model cars have circuitry to prevent overcharging AGM batteries, the 3G TLs have no such safeguards.
  • When an AGM battery is overcharged, and once the hydrogen catalyst has been consumed, overcharging will end the life of the battery in pretty short order
  • As a general rule, AGM batteries are pretty good plug in replacements for flooded lead acid batteries, but only for cars which make a lot of short trips.
  • When an AGM battery is used in a car not designed for that type of battery, the battery will typically have a very short life if the car it is in does lots of long-distance highway driving.
Given I do a lot of highway driving, say 10-12 trips of 20+ miles per week, I am concerned if I opt for an AGM battery, I'll destroy it in a matter of a few months. With that in mind, I have a few questions for the collective here:
  • Should I simply stop overthinking it and put a wet battery in?
  • Is there a relatively easy way to enhance ten-plus year old charging systems of older cars to play nice with an AGM battery?
  • And most importantly, for those of y'all who've already taken the plunge into the AGM world, what has your experience been?
 

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I put an Optima AGM in my 92 Bonneville years ago and it is still kicking just fine.
 

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Latent car nut
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Discussion Starter #4
I put an Optima AGM in my 92 Bonneville years ago and it is still kicking just fine.
Per the things I was reading yesterday, if the Bonneville was used for primarily short trips, the AGM battery should indeed last a long time.

Looks nice: https://www.costco.ca/Energizer-24F-AGM-Battery.product.100404760.html

East Penn makes AGM batteries and can be contacted as well: http://www.eastpenncanada.com/agm.html

How long are you keeping the vehicle?
My plan is to keep the TL for another four or five years, at least. It only has 154,000 miles on it, and last year I put a huge amount of preventative maintenance into it when I replaced the clutch.

The battery you listed above is the same Johnson Controls battery as sold by Walmart, Interstate, Autozone, and probably many others.
 

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fix it if you can
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I know you're not looking to answer any questions, but do the analysis for yourself:
1) what benefit are you looking to gain from AGM battery?
2) what's the price difference - why not simply replace the wet sell in 3 years, will probably cost same...

If you "deep cycle" your battery, AGM might give you longer service life.
any charging system can be retrofitted, it's a question of cost, complexity, and reliability (more parts = more likely failure).
 

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What would a retrofit entail?

This is the first time I've heard about there being differences in the charging system.
 

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I was a dealer of East Penn batteties (the real one, not the Cabadian one).

Mainly dealt with AGM and Gel batteries.

AGM batteries were created for those applications where battery was installed on an awkward possition and could leak, to offer a cheaper alternative to gel.

AGM batteries gained popularity when Optima batteries spent a lot of money on advertising, it is manufactured by Johnson Controls. Optima is not better than any other AGM battery but still, many people falls for it. As a matter of fact, a regular AGM is better than Optima an it's rolled cells.

AGM doesn't really need special charger, gel batteries need special charger to properly charge.
 

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I was a dealer of East Penn batteties (the real one, not the Cabadian one).

Mainly dealt with AGM and Gel batteries.

AGM batteries were created for those applications where battery was installed on an awkward possition and could leak, to offer a cheaper alternative to gel.

AGM batteries gained popularity when Optima batteries spent a lot of money on advertising, it is manufactured by Johnson Controls. Optima is not better than any other AGM battery but still, many people falls for it. As a matter of fact, a regular AGM is better than Optima an it's rolled cells.

AGM doesn't really need special charger, gel batteries need special charger to properly charge.
No need to be jealous. :)
 
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