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fix it if you can
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The Mopar nylon insert bushings are still solid after 30Kmi.. I can hear them in cold weather if I really listen for the click but it's nearly imperceptible.
Maybe not, the clicking was probably coming from the rear sway bar area.. It's a little more pronounced now (that it's colder).

Who's done the rear sway bar? What's your experience - brackets (there are no separate bushings listed) or links or both?
 

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OK, lots of good info here but I have some questions for my 01 T&C,

Is the general thought that the MOPAR bushings are the best bet for now?
Does anyone have the part # for the sway bar bushing Bracket?
What is the easiest way to remove the old bushings, that is should the front suspension be under load or hanging free ?
On the end links, is there process for tightening the nuts without allowing the bolt to turn?

Thanks and have a Merry, Merry ;^)

Jim
 

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OK, lots of good info here but I have some questions for my 01 T&C,

Is the general thought that the MOPAR bushings are the best bet for now?
Does anyone have the part # for the sway bar bushing Bracket?
What is the easiest way to remove the old bushings, that is should the front suspension be under load or hanging free ?
On the end links, is there process for tightening the nuts without allowing the bolt to turn?

Thanks and have a Merry, Merry ;^)

Jim
As to Mopar versus MOOG Blue Problem Solvers, I would say 50/50.
Don't know the part #.
Use ramps to keep the sway bar in a neutral position rather than extreme position (like hanging free would cause). Sway bar has to be centered (curved portion lined up with curved portion in chassis).
There's some stuff in the way on the Driver's side, just unbolt that and move it aside (a couple of bolts).
There's a torx or hex insert in the stud or a place to put an open end wrench on the back depending on which brand you buy. Some come with grease fittings (my preference).
 

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... Does anyone have the part # for the sway bar bushing Bracket? ...
Part number 4684298AD, MSRP $13.20 each, fits 2001 thru 2007.

George
 

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OK, lots of good info here but I have some questions for my 01 T&C,

Is the general thought that the MOPAR bushings are the best bet for now?
Does anyone have the part # for the sway bar bushing Bracket?
What is the easiest way to remove the old bushings, that is should the front suspension be under load or hanging free ?
On the end links, is there process for tightening the nuts without allowing the bolt to turn? Jim
The Mopar bushings are good for me here but if you drive over speed bumps too hard or constantly on rough road conditions and hitting pot holes and such their life is shortened.

You shouldn't need a new bracket but a call to a dealership parts counter will get you the number unless a member here chimes in.

I do mine with the van on jack stands with the tires off. It doesn't seem to matter if its on ramps or not.

****Just remember not to tighten the bushing brackets all the way until you know for sure you have the bar centered. Double check this 1st. I have seen an installation where both bushing brackets were tightened up and the bar was about 1" off center. Even though they were lubed when he pushed the bar over one of them popped out of the bracket!****
 

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I tried to the Moog Problem Solver part K200601 in August 2012 . It lasted less than 3000 miles /5 months. They were clanking and screeching after 1500 miles. Removed them today and went with the Mopar. They are silent for now. We'll find out how long they last. This is my 4th set. Original Mopar lasted 88K. Second set was (Napa or O'reilley blue?) and lasted 18K. 3rd set was the new Moog Problem Solver. I had real high hopes for the Moog product. They failed miserably. The nylong insert had cracks and tore badly. I called Moog and they thought they had a solution with these new Problem Solvers. They had widened the bushing and added the nylon insert. To me it seems the wider length would cause problems because it would extend through the curved bar. The Mopar I installed today looked nicer than the others I have tried. Rubber was sort of grippy as was the nylon insert. I also noticed it was easier to spread out to get over the bar. I am not real confident that the Mopar will work any better. Just a Chronic Chrysler minivan issue. Seems like a very poor design with the bushing and curve of the bar.

Would love to hear solutions. If it continues I will try grease even though not recommended.
 

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something new about Moog Problem Solver vs OEM bushings ? Best deal ?
 

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Just put whatever is cheapest, sway bar bushings are extremely simple.

Most sway bar bushings are supposed to grip onto the sway bar and flex when it travels, it looks like on the 4th Gen they added a nylon insert to allow the bar to rotate freely.

There are 3 solutions if the nylon isn't working.
  1. Discard the nylon, use only the rubber. This is how most cars are designed, the rubber flexes to allow travel which also adds some damping characteristics. Just make sure to tighten down the bushing brackets with the suspension at ride height.
  2. Clean the bar thoroughly. The nylon needs to rotate on the bar, there shouldn't be any dirt or debris trapped between the nylon and the sway bar. Best case is that you have a polished finish.
  3. Grease the bushing and bar. Use lithium grease, silicone grease, or petroleum jelly, they won't degrade the rubber. Apply the grease onto the sway bar where it contacts the nylon bushing, and again between the nylon and rubber. The surfaces need to be smooth and spotless.
I'd suggest number 2 and 3. They added the nylon to promote free rotation of the sway bar in the rubber bushing. The proper grease will further promote rotation and protect the nylon from friction.
 

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Just put whatever is cheapest, sway bar bushings are extremely simple.

Most sway bar bushings are supposed to grip onto the sway bar and flex when it travels, it looks like on the 4th Gen they added a nylon insert to allow the bar to rotate freely.

There are 3 solutions if the nylon isn't working.
  1. Discard the nylon, use only the rubber. This is how most cars are designed, the rubber flexes to allow travel which also adds some damping characteristics. Just make sure to tighten down the bushing brackets with the suspension at ride height.
  2. Clean the bar thoroughly. The nylon needs to rotate on the bar, there shouldn't be any dirt or debris trapped between the nylon and the sway bar. Best case is that you have a polished finish.
  3. Grease the bushing and bar. Use lithium grease, silicone grease, or petroleum jelly, they won't degrade the rubber. Apply the grease onto the sway bar where it contacts the nylon bushing, and again between the nylon and rubber. The surfaces need to be smooth and spotless.
I'd suggest number 2 and 3. They added the nylon to promote free rotation of the sway bar in the rubber bushing. The proper grease will further promote rotation and protect the nylon from friction.
What you wrote is interesting. I believe the bushings, with or without the insert, are designed to grip the sway bar though. Neither MOOG nor Mopar list a lubricant for them. The Parts Guys at Mopar say "no lubrication".

Some interesting stuff here on the various designs of sway bar systems: https://forum.chryslerminivan.net/threads/sway-bar-bushing-replacement.114825/page-3#post-1202033

Over the years Chrysler/Mopar came out with various designs, for the 4th Generation, like a rubber bushing; a rubber bushing with a fabric bonded to it to help grip the sway bar; a polyurethane bushing (I believe); a rubber bushing with a nylon insert; a rubber bushing with a nylon insert plus a paste (lubricant?) between the bushing and the insert; then back to the rubber bushing with a nylon insert. They still haven't got it right, unfortunately. I believe the bushing is too small for the twisting required. MOOG makes a fatter bushing but still a problem unsolved.
 

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Suprisingly, Nylon against steel, dry and without lubrication, has a lower coefficient of friction than rubber does greased.
Nylon is typically used in self lubricating bearings, bushings, and slides.

 

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What you wrote is interesting. I believe the bushings, with or without the insert, are designed to grip the sway bar though. Neither MOOG nor Mopar list a lubricant for them. The Parts Guys at Mopar say "no lubrication".

Some interesting stuff here on the various designs of sway bar systems: https://forum.chryslerminivan.net/threads/sway-bar-bushing-replacement.114825/page-3#post-1202033

Over the years Chrysler/Mopar came out with various designs, for the 4th Generation, like a rubber bushing; a rubber bushing with a fabric bonded to it to help grip the sway bar; a polyurethane bushing (I believe); a rubber bushing with a nylon insert; a rubber bushing with a nylon insert plus a paste (lubricant?) between the bushing and the insert; then back to the rubber bushing with a nylon insert.
But if you go the urethane way, they list an special lubricant.
 

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well, I just bougt OEM ones (K04743041AE) - rubber with insert, but no sure - should I use those inserts or not ?
 

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The bushing are designed to resist up/down and front/back movement. A round bar in a round bushing cannot, unless you get it super, super tight and even then it's tenuous, resist torque twist, and sway bars are designed to twist.

The noise our sway bars make, which I have believed since the beginning of recorded history, is called stick-slip. The bars stick in the bushing, and when the torque twist gets large enough, they finally twist and produce noise, which is why any liquidy lubricant, sprayed into the bushings, quiets the bushing until you need to lubricate again.
 

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But if you go the urethane way, they list an special lubricant.
Don't dampen well either, very hard material. BUT ....... they may be quiet.
 

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The bushing are designed to resist up/down and front/back movement. A round bar in a round bushing cannot, unless you get it super, super tight and even then it's tenuous, resist torque twist, and sway bars are designed to twist.

The noise our sway bars make, which I have believed since the beginning of recorded history, is called stick-slip. The bars stick in the bushing, and when the torque twist gets large enough, they finally twist and produce noise, which is why any liquidy lubricant, sprayed into the bushings, quiets the bushing until you need to lubricate again.
Your control arm bushings are solid rubber too. The rubber in a normal sway bar bushing or control arm bushing flexes to allow rotation, but it does not allow the bar to slip within its grip. It provides some extra damping because the rubber is trying to force the suspension back to ride-height, the rubber wants to be in an untorqued state.
 

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Your control arm bushings are solid rubber too. The rubber in a normal sway bar bushing or control arm bushing flexes to allow rotation, but it does not allow the bar to slip within its grip. It provides some extra damping because the rubber is trying to force the suspension back to ride-height, the rubber wants to be in an untorqued state.
You are exactly right!

Slipping causes squeaking, and other noises, unless there's a grease fitting in place, by design, to facilitate lubrication against the squeaking.

The big sway bar bushings, on the front bumper of my Jeep, allow for a lot of movement. No nylon inserts either. They have always been super quiet. They work like they should.

Speaking of control arm bushings the Ford cars, from the mid 60s, could be heard a mile away due to their control arm bushings squeaking.
 
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