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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 02 Voyager with 108K on the 2.4.
I was just wondering what I should look out for?
 

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Look out for falling rocks on those twisty roads in the Rocky Mountains :)

Actually, I don't have much experience with the 2.4L engine. It's apparently a pretty reliable mill however. A coworker of mine has a '96 Voyager with the 2.4L and he's put on about a billion miles with it. He's never had the engine apart.

I drove an '02 Caravan eC with the 2.4L and was more impressed with it than I thought I'd be.

Other than that, I don't have any insight. Sorry.
 

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Just keep the timing belts changed at the proper intervals, and keep fresh plugs and wires on it. As with any modern engine, the concept of "maintenance" has really changed. Plugs and wires are about it, and timing belts if the engine has one (the 2.4L does). Ignitions are distributorless and timing can't be set by hand anymore.
 

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No threads here because there are relatively few Caravans with the 2.4 engine.

We had an 88 with a 2.5 four cylinder and it was very smooth and reliable. I sold it before I changed the timing belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So- at 108K I don't know if the previous owner has changed the timing belt.

Can it be inspected to see if it's worn out?
Any special tools needed?
Is it a weekend DIY job? (My skill set includes swapping & rebuilding a rotary engine.)

My Haynes manual is in the mail.
 

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I don't think timing belts wear. I think they just break after enough stress. They're usually cogged belts and I think after so long, the "teeth" will start to chunk out or the belt will just "snap", like a serpentine belt will.

It's certainly something you can do yourself...if you're so inclined. I think you'll need a various assortment of gear pullers (like for the crankshaft pulley for example). Myself, I would get a FSM, Factory Service Manual. The Haynes manual may show enough information, but they're often generic, and may not include the right torque values for your particular year.

I don't happen to know off-hand what the change interval is for the 2.4L timing belt. I'd guess either 60,000 miles or 105,000 miles...those seem to be the common replacement intervals these days -- driven by the belt supplier to a large extent I'm sure.
 

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Timing belts do wear. The biggest problem with them (besides people not changing them at proper intervals) is cleanliness. People who let thier engines get greasy/oily help to drasticly shorten the life of thier belts. The oil/grease gets onto the pullies and the belt and start deteriorating it. It makes it softer and the cogs can tear or dissolve, causing the vehicle to slip time and cause the engine to lose power and problems starting. Then the old EXPENSIVE VALVE/PISTON dance happens and you have a couple of thousand dollar repair bill. If you start getting excessive oil leaks - Especially on the belt side, make sure you GET IT FIXED and clean it up.
 

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Sureshot, I don't want to scare you but go to TECH TIPS. READ "FIX: 1999 Plymouth Voyager 2.4L - No Start ". Not saying that this is a common problem but something to keep in mind if/when you change your timing belt and if you ever have a NO START problem.
 

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i would change the timing belt with that amount of mileage. my van just died a few days ago at 181K cause the timing belt was never changed. it had the 3.0, which also have timing belts. im not sure if those are interference engines or not.
 
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