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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tried to remove the drain plug on my '06 while cold but it wouldn't budge.

Never had this happen before.

I'm chicken to try a lot of muscle on it!

Any suggestions?
 

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Tried to remove the drain plug on my '06 while cold but it wouldn't budge.

Never had this happen before.

I'm chicken to try a lot of muscle on it!

Any suggestions?
***Disclaimer: I take no responsibility for incurred damage***.

Put a breaker bar on it and tap lightly with a hammer. I've had oil change places really over torque my oil drain plug. Tapping on the bar usually frees it up. I've never had one shear off or damage the oil pan doing this. IDK, maybe warming up the engine would expand the pan a bit and make removing easier. Just a thought.
 
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I haven't pulled a drain plug in over 15 years, I do this instead: http://www.yachtsee.com/pelaoilextractor.htm
I gotta get me one of those. :thumb: Do you suppose that the tubing would be narrow enough to get through/past the valve body and into the transmission pan? Not sure how narrow the passageway from the dip stick tube into the trans pan is. My drain pan plug is up pretty high on the pan. It would be nice to get all the way to the bottom.
 

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I gotta get me one of those. :thumb: Do you suppose that the tubing would be narrow enough to get through/past the valve body and into the transmission pan? Not sure how narrow the passageway from the dip stick tube into the trans pan is. My drain pan plug is up pretty high on the pan. It would be nice to get all the way to the bottom.
I've used the extractor on engines and transmissions of all sorts; the unit comes with at least two diameter tubes, the smaller tube slows things down a bit but hey, at least it gets in there. :)
 
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Tried to remove the drain plug on my '06 while cold but it wouldn't budge.

Never had this happen before.

I'm chicken to try a lot of muscle on it!

Any suggestions?
You did the previous oil changes correct? Assuming yes, then you must have a good feel for how it usually breaks free, even if you don't use a torque wrench to tighten it. So do you have any idea why this time would be different than usual? In any case, I don't think anything would happen if you just give it a push with a breaker bar.
 
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When I had to do an oil change on Miron's van, the oil pan drain plug wouldn't budge. So, I jacked up the van a bit, put a pipe or similar on the ratchet (as an extension) and that helped me loose the drain plug....now I got to get myself one of those actual oil filter wrenches...
 

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For removing the oil plug I usually set my short 3/8" drive ratchet wrench up so I can give it one good pound with my fist, same for brake pins. That usually does it.

Give the plug a shock, it will come out.
 
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I gotta get me one of those. :thumb: Do you suppose that the tubing would be narrow enough to get through/past the valve body and into the transmission pan? Not sure how narrow the passageway from the dip stick tube into the trans pan is. My drain pan plug is up pretty high on the pan. It would be nice to get all the way to the bottom.
Seems to me that 5/16" tube is snug in parts of the transmission drain tube access.

See here: http://forum.chryslerminivan.net/showthread.php/23868-Quick-Fixes?p=770329#post770329
 

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For removing the oil plug I usually set my short 3/8" drive ratchet wrench up so I can give it one good pound with my fist, same for brake pins. That usually does it.

Give the plug a shock, it will come out.
I prefer to use the box end of a combo wrench - I can hold the wrench on the plug bolt with one hand while giving it the "pop" with the other.
Why some of these oil change shops seem to think that impact-wrenching everything "works better" is beyond me..:angry:
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
No, I just got the van in May and have never changed the oil.

As I said, never have I seen this happen before.

Messed these up good, they were meant as direct answers to cv and Doug!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I tried this but lost my nerve!

I'm afraid of twisting the drain boss out of the sheet metal. I've seen that done a few times installing plugs with air wrenches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks.

Never thought much of those things but I may have to do that.

The cold pan may be part of the problem, never tried one cold before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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How long does it take?

Some reviews said it takes 1-4 hrs?

The specs say the tube is 3/16 OD so ID must be 1/8"?
Some reviews say it takes hours? Seriously?

Warm the engine up, shove the tube down the dip stick, pump to create a vacuum; five minutes tops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
45 min was the minimum time, up to 4 hrs.

What is the ID of your tube?

Thanks.
 

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45 min was the minimum time, up to 4 hrs.

What is the ID of your tube?

Thanks.
Small Tube = 5/32" (which fit our 2003)
Large Tube = 3/16" (which fit both of our 1998s, and hopefully my "new" 1999)

The larger tube is substantially faster; I can drive the van up on some ramps, start the extraction, slide under to do the filter R&R, and the extraction is done before I finish with the filter. The smaller tube would take an extra two or three minutes.

I have no idea what folks are doing that would take even 45 minutes much less 4 hours, errr, unless they aren't warming up the engine and the oil first and were using straight 50 weight oil. I think I tried doing an oil change on a cold engine (with 0W-40 in it) one time and the oil came out R-E-A-L - S-L-O-W, and even then I think it finished in less than a half-hour.
 

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Thanks.

The cold pan may be part of the problem, never tried one cold before.
The temperature of the pan shouldn't make a whole lot of difference.
An earlier post advised tapping on the ratchet or breaker bar with your fist. This is very good advice! Use a short six point socket, not a 12 point socket on the head of the plug. Preferably use a 1/2" ratchet, if not a 3/8" should be fine, and tap it "smartly" 2-3 times if necessary. A short breaker bar might be better, but they are rare these days. (Be certain you are going the correct direction-it's easy to go the wrong direction under a car:)) This is the best way to remove a tight bolt. The "jarring" effect really helps, and reduces the chances of stripping threads, or damaging the pan.
After removing the bolt, examine the threads carefully. Any signs of distorted threads means a replacement is in order. Any "rounding" of the head is also reason for replacement.

BTW when I first changed the oil on my T&C, I used a 24" breaker bar on the oil pan bolt and "really" had to "clobber" it with a heavy steel hammer about 5 times to get it loose.
I'd like to find the gorilla that tightened that one!
 

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The temperature of the pan shouldn't make a whole lot of difference.
An earlier post advised tapping on the ratchet or breaker bar with your fist. This is very good advice! Use a short six point socket, not a 12 point socket on the head of the plug. Preferably use a 1/2" ratchet, if not a 3/8" should be fine, and tap it "smartly" 2-3 times if necessary. A short breaker bar might be better, but they are rare these days. (Be certain you are going the correct direction-it's easy to go the wrong direction under a car:)) This is the best way to remove a tight bolt. The "jarring" effect really helps, and reduces the chances of stripping threads, or damaging the pan.
After removing the bolt, examine the threads carefully. Any signs of distorted threads means a replacement is in order. Any "rounding" of the head is also reason for replacement.

BTW when I first changed the oil on my T&C, I used a 24" breaker bar on the oil pan bolt and "really" had to "clobber" it with a heavy steel hammer about 5 times to get it loose.
I'd like to find the gorilla that tightened that one!
An impact wrench would work as well. Removing spark plugs with an impact wrench is not unheard of either.
 

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An impact wrench would work as well. Removing spark plugs with an impact wrench is not unheard of either.
Actually, using an impact wrench for removing spark plugs from aluminum heads is a great idea as it dramatically lessens the chances of pulling the threads out with the plug. That said, every time I've suggested this either here or on other forums I gotten soundly flamed. I suggest you don your Nomex suit and head for cover, I'm doing the same. :)
 
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