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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's what an oil filter cover looks like when dissected.

SKP SK917190 {68191350AA}

It mates with this shape Pentastar engine oil filter.
Turn that filter upside down though as the pointy part goes to the bottom in the housing.
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The three main pieces:
the cover proper
an insert containing a small spring loaded bypass valve.
a larger spring acting as a retainer and also providing about 1/4 inch of collapsible space.
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Inside of gutted cover: The insert snaps into the cover, retaining the spring therein. Notice the 4 tabs, they have grabbers to hold the insert in place, while allowing about 1/4" of room for the spring to compress, to allow for variations in length of filter. The filters do vary in length from brand to brand and even within brands..They end up being compressed in place, many times twisted some, when the cover is torqued to spec.
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The insert with the spring in place. Notice the cap at the bottom that is the bypass valve that opens and closes as needbe (oil pressure differential). Above that is the groove that a couple of tabs on the filter core snap into when the filter is pushed into cover.
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The spring loaded bypass valve within the insert:
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Retainer spring placement.
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That's all there is to it. The filter ends up being clamped between the top circular surface and a similar, I expect, but not spring loaded, bottom surface. The FRAM XG11665 filter (the best of the best) :) I use has a core that is free to rotate within the filter itself, which cuts down on binding, I think. The pleats still get twisted a little. I torque to 15 ft. lbs. At that point things are squeaking and grinding a bit. That's CONCERNING! 18 ft. lb is close by but I don't trust the accuracy of the torque wrench that well nor the strength of the fragile housing. Seems to work, no leaks.
This time I snapped the filter into the cap, the previous time I snapped the filter into the base. Either way should work fine as the filter body ends up being clamped in place. Snapping into the base avoids messing around with pulling and pushing on the insert connection within the cover. If it comes apart, it can be put back together though, using some alignment skills. Turning while pushing/pulling makes things easier but do it straight on, no twisting the insert sideways or it may snap out of position. That doesn't mean that it breaks though. as some oil jockey may claim.
 
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All the parts (except the filter element and large housing O-ring) can stay put upon disassembly, yes? My pal's 2017's housing unscrewed, the filter was plainly evident, the new one went in easily.
The other parts never evidenced themselves. Should these other parts be cleaned or inspected?

Since oil jockeys came up....You wonder why these "extra parts" were designed into the system Looks like something for a careless person to mess up or lose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
All the parts (except the filter element and large housing O-ring) can stay put upon disassembly, yes? My pal's 2017's housing unscrewed, the filter was plainly evident, the new one went in easily.
The other parts never evidenced themselves. Should these other parts be cleaned or inspected?

Since oil jockeys came up....You wonder why these "extra parts" were designed into the system Looks like something for a careless person to mess up or lose.
The cover is not intended to come apart. I've snapped mine back together fairly easily though. Not pulling the filter straight out can put sideways pressure on the insert's grappers and dislodge the insert.

When changing the filter, the normal procedure seems to be to push the filter into the cover so that it snaps in place (different grappers, two of them, inside the filter core, do the grabbing). Then put the filter, with cover attached, into the housing, and tighten down. When removing the old filter from the cover, a firm pull is required to get past those two grappers. This is where things can go wrong if the pull is to the side, instead of straight out. Yes, this is the 21st century, believe it or not. :)

Another procedure is to put the filter in the housing first and push it into the base (with a snap as well). Then put the cover in place and tighten down.

The results should be the same as to clamping the filter between two surfaces for sealing. The benefit to the second procedure is that the the cover will come out without the filter attached (in my experience), something to do with the screwing effects of the procedure on the two grappers. This requires less space for removal/replacement of the filter plus less things to go wrong per the first method.

Which procedure did your Pal use?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Information from the cover assembly:

25+50 Nm. Guess that means 25.50 Nm (18.8 ft. lb)
Do not open when engine is running
PA66GF30
on the insert bypass cap. That's a material spec per:
1
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Picture of my latest removed filter, sitting in an unused cover.

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Quite a difference.
What's the gunk? :) Did you rinse the cover out? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Actually, I read somewhere that, "a dirty filter is a happy filter", so I reinstalled it.
Looked pretty sad to me. Too much moly? :)
 

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I was kidding. I'm a big, "get the dirt OUT of an engine", person.
While I'm super glad oils are better now-a-days and I believe highway warriors can get 10K and 15K uses from their oil; I also feel most people do not travel long distances all the time and, therefore, cannot run any oil that long.
The gooey filter picture was online.

My pal was a lube tech in a factory full of different, huge machinery and would never have such a horrid filter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Another filter (cap) story. Crushed filter? Spin on filters were so simple.

 
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