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My van is a 2003 3.3l . Myoil light comes on at idle when warmed up. If you are at a traffic light on red and the idle drops below700 it will blink on. If I give it a little gas its goes out. I changed the sensor no help. I have driven on the freeway and city engine does not knock.
 

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My van is a 2003 3.3l . Myoil light comes on at idle when warmed up. If you are at a traffic light on red and the idle drops below700 it will blink on. If I give it a little gas its goes out. I changed the sensor no help. I have driven on the freeway and city engine does not knock.
Does the 2003 have high miles? When was the last time the motor for oil was flushed with Gunk Motor Flush or Seafoam just prior to an oil change?

My old 2005 and now my 2006 idles at 750rpms.

Getting the light on may indicate it's near a stall condition and the oil isn't circulating properly in the engine at those low rpms.

The throttle body on these vans have mechanical idle stops that work with the electronic IAC. The cables for the idle sit in a cam groove on the throttle body. Rotate that upwards. beneath it is a set-screw looking thing. This is place there to keep the fuel at a trickle when the pedal isn't used. If this is worn tooooo much, the idle will drop lower than when the van was new. You can place a 0.032 [0.81mm] shim there and see if the idle improves.

It's easy to remove material from that permanent set-screw thing, but not easy adding to it or the cable track cam.
 

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Did the new sensor behave exactly the same as the old sensor? New sensor could be bad as well. An oil pressure sensor made by Standard Auto Parts would be suspect, based on my experience.

What brand and viscosity of motor oil are you using? Is the oil level low?

What brand of oil filter are you using? When was it last changed? Does it have a bypass valve?

Other than that, you are looking at the oil pump and the pressure control valve there. Not likely the problem though, hopefully.

Any check engine light? code?
 

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Does the 2003 have high miles? When was the last time the motor for oil was flushed with Gunk Motor Flush or Seafoam just prior to an oil change?

My old 2005 and now my 2006 idles at 750rpms.

Getting the light on may indicate it's near a stall condition and the oil isn't circulating properly in the engine at those low rpms.

The throttle body on these vans have mechanical idle stops that work with the electronic IAC. The cables for the idle sit in a cam groove on the throttle body. Rotate that upwards. beneath it is a set-screw looking thing. This is place there to keep the fuel at a trickle when the pedal isn't used. If this is worn tooooo much, the idle will drop lower than when the van was new. You can place a 0.032 [0.81mm] shim there and see if the idle improves.

It's easy to remove material from that permanent set-screw thing, but not easy adding to it or the cable track cam.

Yes it has high miles 220,000. No I haven't ever done that flush you are referring to.
 

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Did the new sensor behave exactly the same as the old sensor? New sensor could be bad as well. An oil pressure sensor made by Standard Auto Parts would be suspect, based on my experience.

What brand and viscosity of motor oil are you using? Is the oil level low?

What brand of oil filter are you using? When was it last changed? Does it have a bypass valve?

Other than that, you are looking at the oil pump and the pressure control valve there. Not likely the problem though, hopefully.

Any check engine light? code?
Hello yes it was a standard auto parts sensor. It looked just like the old one. The van acts the same way it did with the old one.During the warm summer it was coming on a little earlier. So I changed the oil to 10/40 filter was a Bosch. It seemed to help a little. maybe 500 miles on oil change. Don't know about bypass valve.
One other thing I don't think related but maybe.It stalls at take off when cold (only in the winter not summer.)
 

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Flushes are mostly upselling by the Dealerships and Shops. There are not mentioned in the Owner Manual except for coolant flush. Chrysler actually issued a Service Bulletin to its Dealerships about flushes not being required and could actually void the warranty..

 

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So I changed the oil to 10/40 filter was a Bosch. It seemed to help a little. maybe 500 miles on oil change. Don't know about bypass valve.
One other thing I don't think related but maybe.It stalls at take off when cold (only in the winter not summer.)
Is this van a diesel? 10W40 would be alright for this. BUT, for petro/gas, 10W30 summer & 5W30 winter are specified for your model year van.

Having that 10W40 in there could be causing all kinds of issues in that high mileage engine.
 

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Flushes are mostly up selling by the Dealerships and Shops. There are not mentioned in the Owner Manual except for coolant flush. Chrysler actually issued a Service Bulletin to its Dealerships about flushes not being required and could actually void the warranty..

Cool. My vehicle and year wasn't on the list. :) I can flush no problems to void the warranty. (um, what warranty on a 14 year old van).
 

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Did the new sensor behave exactly the same as the old sensor? New sensor could be bad as well. An oil pressure sensor made by Standard Auto Parts would be suspect, based on my experience.

What brand and viscosity of motor oil are you using? Is the oil level low?

What brand of oil filter are you using? When was it last changed? Does it have a bypass valve?

Other than that, you are looking at the oil pump and the pressure control valve there. Not likely the problem though, hopefully.

Any check engine light? code?

I had the same issue on my 2005 DGC. I replaced the sensor with an AAP one, lasted 14 months (just out of warranty) and got the issue again. Went and got an OEM sensor from the Dodge dealer, no more problem.
 

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Cool. My vehicle and year wasn't on the list. :) I can flush no problems to void the warranty. (um, what warranty on a 14 year old van).
Flush all you like, but make sure it's done right and not a scam (waste of money plus possibly harmful to durability). :)
 

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Flush all you like, but make sure it's done right and not a scam (waste of money plus possibly harmful to durability). :)
Jeepman,

Have you ever had a relative to own a car, in our case a Chrysler New Yorker, and never change the engine oil in 5 years? The engine blew up and she can't figure out why? Just out of curiosity, I pulled the valve cover off. It was thick sludge and oil cement inside! She only thought that putting gas in the tank and new tires is all that was needed to keep it going.

Roll back another decade earlier. A co-worker got his first car from his mom. Nearly the same neglect. BUT, with Gunk Motor Flush, we actually saved that Ford Taurus. It took 3X oil changes in a week to get the sludge out enough. It ran horribly when he got it. Even the air filter was caked.

Both vehicles were already on their death beds. One died, the other saved for another 7 years when somebody hit the Ford in an accident. Seafoam and Gunk are the 2 that have positive results.

Yes, there are too many so called miracle things in a bottle on the market. Agree whole heatedly on that. Most work like throttle body spacer technology.

BMaverick
 

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Having that 10W40 in there could be causing all kinds of issues in that high mileage engine. Who said that?
Thicker oil in a new engine might not be a good idea. But even on new engines, it shouldn't hurt either. Maybe not 10W-40 in colder climates, but 5W-40 should be OK.

On older, high mileage engines, 10W-40 should work just fine.

On colder climates, the number before the W is what really counts.

Thinner oils are now used to please the government.
 

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Thicker oil in a new engine might not be a good idea. But even on new engines, it shouldn't hurt either. Maybe not 10W-40 in colder climates, but 5W-40 should be OK.

On older, high mileage engines, 10W-40 should work just fine.

On colder climates, the number before the W is what really counts.

Thinner oils are now used to please the government.
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ for LEVY. :)
 

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Jeepman,

Have you ever had a relative to own a car, in our case a Chrysler New Yorker, and never change the engine oil in 5 years? The engine blew up and she can't figure out why? Just out of curiosity, I pulled the valve cover off. It was thick sludge and oil cement inside! She only thought that putting gas in the tank and new tires is all that was needed to keep it going.

Roll back another decade earlier. A co-worker got his first car from his mom. Nearly the same neglect. BUT, with Gunk Motor Flush, we actually saved that Ford Taurus. It took 3X oil changes in a week to get the sludge out enough. It ran horribly when he got it. Even the air filter was caked.

Both vehicles were already on their death beds. One died, the other saved for another 7 years when somebody hit the Ford in an accident. Seafoam and Gunk are the 2 that have positive results.

Yes, there are too many so called miracle things in a bottle on the market. Agree whole heatedly on that. Most work like throttle body spacer technology.

BMaverick
Synthetic oil can be used as a flush, so can diesel specified motor oil, with lots of detergents in it, just before an oil change. Don't forget the filter plugging up, if the oil is that bad.

Flushing is an emergency situation procedure like wrong fluid put in the system.
 

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Yes it has high miles 220,000. No I haven't ever done that flush you are referring to.
A number of years ago on a lark I bought a VW Rabbit convertible for my wife to enjoy. It had flabby oil pressure at idle when warm. Blinking oil light and the gauge read just on the low edge of what was permissible at idle (I forget what it was exactly). Cold it was fine. Calling on an experience my brother had on his built 351 when warm, I switched to full synthetic oil and a quality oil filter. The Rabbit immediately picked up 5 lbs of pressure when cold or warm at both idle and at speed. Never saw the blinking light again. Another advantage I saw on the Rabbit's gauge was that oil pressure at start-up came up noticeably faster than when using dino oil. Try a quality synthetic oil change if you are not using it already. Synthetic's superior pump-ability and heat tolerance could benefit this situation. Since then I use synthetic oils in everything, it's just better stuff by a huge margin.
 

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A number of years ago on a lark I bought a VW Rabbit convertible for my wife to enjoy. It had flabby oil pressure at idle when warm. Blinking oil light and the gauge read just on the low edge of what was permissible at idle (I forget what it was exactly). Cold it was fine. Calling on an experience my brother had on his built 351 when warm, I switched to full synthetic oil and a quality oil filter. The Rabbit immediately picked up 5 lbs of pressure when cold or warm at both idle and at speed. Never saw the blinking light again. Another advantage I saw on the Rabbit's gauge was that oil pressure at start-up came up noticeably faster than when using dino oil. Try a quality synthetic oil change if you are not using it already. Synthetic's superior pump-ability and heat tolerance could benefit this situation. Since then I use synthetic oils in everything, it's just better stuff by a huge margin.
Isn't oil pressure higher at startup?

5W is 5W regardless. Does synthetic oil warm up faster than conventional, i.e. more friction because engine heat is the same?.

Any credible measurements been taken of any difference in pumpability?

My 2016 has Pennzoil syntheyic oil in it this oil change (Dealership was out of conventional). Absolutely no difference in day to day operation.

Just sayin. :) Synthetic oil has its benefits, mainly related to longer oil change intervals.
 
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