The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if this is a engine block heater plug or something to run the electronics on with engine off without using battery? Am not sure. Thanks


Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Maybe you have a hybrid version!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
So how's it work? Just plug in at night and leave it until you're ready to go? Kind of curious about the energy consumption of this vs allowing engine to warm up on cold winter mornings

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
When you plug it in, it powers a heating element buried inside the engine block. I tend to use mine on a timer, as soon as it hits -20ºC (-4ºF, I think). After 2-4 hours (depending on how cold it is), it won't get much warmer anyway.. My dad always told me not to leave it plugged in all night as it would cause condensation inside the engine. Don't know how much truth there is to that, but it always made sense to me..

As to power consumption, I think they run +/- 1kW or so. I have run 2 block heaters on a 20A circut, so it has to be somewhere in that range. Here in Manitoba, our power cost is 8.74 cents per KwH, so that doesn't equate to a lot of cash (around $10/month @ 4 hrs & 1kW if my math is right). Not bad, considering it replaces 5-10 minutes of idling per morning.

I'd also consider the wear & tear of the engine innards. Cold oil (especially conventional) doesn't like to flow at extreme cold temperatures. Block heater fixes that nicely, even at -40º...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I always use it when it gets below -15°C out. You really hear a big difference in the engine cranking in cold temperatures to start in the morning when it’s been plugged in. It’s much “friendly” to the engine, especially as it ages.

I installed one in my second vehicle as well because it didn’t come equipped from the dealer. But I used a mat this time which glues onto the bottom of the oil pan. Apparently it is more efficient and effective? I guess they both accomplish the same thing.

As far as condensation goes, I seriously doubt that there is enough heat generated by the block heater to cause that. It is far more likely that condensate forms when the engine cools down after being at operating temperature. Plugging in your block heater over night doesn’t give you any additional advantage. It only takes a couple of hours to reach as high a temp as it’s going to. If the additional energy use is a concern to you, a timer is a good solution. How long it would take for the energy savings to pay off the cost of the timer depend on how much you pay for electricity in your area. Some people just run an extension cord out from a plug on a switch or to an outlet they can plug in without going outside. They plug it in (or flip the switch) when they wake up, and the car is good by the time they are ready to leave the house.

Note: it’s always a good idea to unplug the vehicle before you pull out of the driveway! Laugh if you will, but many people forget, at least once!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
My dad always told me not to leave it plugged in all night as it would cause condensation inside the engine. Don't know how much truth there is to that, but it always made sense to me..
Engineer here. Condensation is not a concern. The reason not to leave it plugged in all night is after about an hour, it isn't going to get any warmer because it gets to the point where the engine loses heat as fast as the heater adds it. Any longer than an hour or so is a waste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the great responses. I'll get it on a timer or something an hour before I gotta leave for work and that should work well it sounds like.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top