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Discussion Starter #1
My 2012 Town & Country headlights work, but they're not very bright. I got this car used a few months ago and I assume these are OEM. One of them is full of condensation.

Rather than mess with brighter bulbs and trying to seal the leak, I'd rather replace them with clean new headlight assemblies. It looks pretty easy to do according to youtube videos.

There are several such aftermarket headlights listed on Amazon in the range of $60 per assembly. But they all seem to be standard halogen and may not provide any better illumination.

I don't want the low beams too bright -- can't stand it when oncoming cars blind me with their after market "low" beams that are brighter than the sun. I'd just like the high beams to be more powerful, and of course to have new, crystal clear assemblies for maximum efficiency.

Any suggestions?
 

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If you want better high beams, some members here have swapped to an "H9" bulb I believe and found that to be better

The one with condensation is probably not putting out the full light potential, so replacing that one could be a good call. Only hesitation I have with aftermarket headlights, is the light optics aren't always right, so you could end up with awful light scatter (and thus blinding other drivers) and reduced useful light output for you - not as bad as the people that stuff HIDs into their factory halogen housings, but still.

There's always the option of doing an HID retrofit if the factory halogens aren't up to your requirements. There are a few of us here that have done this, and have been very happy with the light output from those. That would be more expensive, and there are a few options - OEM HID headlight swap, or retrofit a set of halogen housings.

I'd probably start by replacing the one with condensation in it and see how that helps. If that isn't any better, then you can move onto looking at changing the housings out for HIDs. And if you decide to go the retrofit route, you could use the headlight with condensation as a "practice" light.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you want better high beams, some members here have swapped to an "H9" bulb I believe and found that to be better

The one with condensation is probably not putting out the full light potential, so replacing that one could be a good call. Only hesitation I have with aftermarket headlights, is the light optics aren't always right, so you could end up with awful light scatter (and thus blinding other drivers) and reduced useful light output for you - not as bad as the people that stuff HIDs into their factory halogen housings, but still.

There's always the option of doing an HID retrofit if the factory halogens aren't up to your requirements. There are a few of us here that have done this, and have been very happy with the light output from those. That would be more expensive, and there are a few options - OEM HID headlight swap, or retrofit a set of halogen housings.

I'd probably start by replacing the one with condensation in it and see how that helps. If that isn't any better, then you can move onto looking at changing the housings out for HIDs. And if you decide to go the retrofit route, you could use the headlight with condensation as a "practice" light.
That sounds like good advice. Maybe I'll start with replacing the leaky one and also get some Philips X-Treme halogens to brighten things up....

I've heard that HID is excessively bright for oncoming drivers - is that the case, or is it that they are improperly aimed?
 

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That sounds like good advice. Maybe I'll start with replacing the leaky one and also get some Philips X-Treme halogens to brighten things up....

I've heard that HID is excessively bright for oncoming drivers - is that the case, or is it that they are improperly aimed?
Alot of those "better" halogen bulbs aren't really brighter. And if they are, they are short lived. So take the claims with a grain of salt.

Stuffing HID bulbs into a halogen housing will create that nasty blinding light that you are all too familiar with. Having HID bulbs in a proper projector (like the OEM HID headlights) will not cause issues for oncoming traffic in low beams, and will allow you to see better! There is a "cut off shield" that blocks light in such a way so it won't blind other drivers. Looks like this:





Member "lowfat" is our resident HID expert, he could explain things better for you, were you to be interested in doing the HIDs in projectors.

Check out the link in my signature for my process
 
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