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Discussion Starter #21
the T&C fluid pot is on the left side. Should I start with right rear, then left rear, then front right and finally left front? I see conflicting info. I have my $8 worth of DOT 3 from Walmart ready to go !! Thanks guys.
 

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When I exchange the brake fluid it was about 80 deg.f. Open the bleeder screw and let gravity do its job. Didn't need to push the brake peddle. Started at right rear, left rear, right front, left front. Takes about an hour.
Done that before. Just takes a little time.
 

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the T&C fluid pot is on the left side. Should I start with right rear, then left rear, then front right and finally left front? I see conflicting info. I have my $8 worth of DOT 3 from Walmart ready to go !! Thanks guys.

Since you are just exchanging fluid, not bleeding air out, you don't need to follow any sequence. Same as if you were replacing a brake caliper, you just bleed the line, never bleed the whole system.

Bleeding the whole system, to get air out, would be because of a major failure, like say the master cylinder. Air in the ABS is a whole other matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Thanks Jeepman. Will report back on completion. Biggest car jobs I have undertaken in the past are just simple change outs of wheel bearings, rotors and pads, plugs and wires etc. Anything I should be especially wary of ? Thanks again.
 

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Thanks Jeepman. Will report back on completion. Biggest car jobs I have undertaken in the past are just simple change outs of wheel bearings, rotors and pads, plugs and wires etc. Anything I should be especially wary of ? Thanks again.
Loosen the cap up. Keep an eye on the reservoir, don't let it drain completely as you will likely introduce air into the system.

Are you doing one at a time or a couple at a time?

Might want to clean the bleeders of dirt and make sure your have a proper fitting wrench/socket.

Make sure the cap is on and tight on completion. Make sure the bleeders are tight on completion.
 

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Pre spray the brake bleeder with PB blaster a few days ahead. Take easy with loosening the bleeders. On older car I'll use a torch.
 

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Well, I hope I can keep driving for many more decades so perhaps one day I may have a brake fault caused by the fluid.
Then I can say to LEVY "I think,that you may be right"..... I'd like to agree with him more often but then we would both be wrong
 

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Well, I hope I can keep driving for many more decades so perhaps one day I may have a brake fault caused by the fluid.
Then I can say to LEVY "I think,that you may be right"..... I'd like to agree with him more often but then we would both be wrong

Actually, I'm agreeing with you:

To be safe, I replace brake fluid every time I change ATF. 😄
If you know me, you should know I never change ATF. 😄
 

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Been maintaining cars for 40+ years and have never changed brake fluid. Currently have a 96 GC with original fluid. Course living in Socal helps. If I lived in the rust belt or an excessively humid region I might.
 

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My brake fluid gets replenished with Fluid Film, oozes in through the hoses. :)

Doesn't hurt to change the brake fluid, not like the damage possible when one changes the transmission fluid (right LEVY? Well, I suppose, if a bird craps on the open reservoir ..........), but don't have to get religious about it, apparently. When a caliper is replaced, replace the fluid in that line. Have to bleed the line some anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Just to add my bit here - about the time my tranny cooler lines needed replacing, I dropped the tranny pan and changed the fluid and filter myself. There was certainly some fragments on the magnet. The fluid was not a pleasant color and I did it because of jerky gear changes. Since then, it has run better than new and this was about 15k ago. I think it does depend on how you drive it too.
 

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Well, I hope I can keep driving for many more decades so perhaps one day I may have a brake fault caused by the fluid.
Then I can say to LEVY "I think,that you may be right"..... I'd like to agree with him more often but then we would both be wrong
But it's true. When the brakes on my '86 Caravan quit working I found the fluid was black as black coffee. A fluid flush resolved the issue.
 

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But it's true. When the brakes on my '86 Caravan quit working I found the fluid was black as black coffee. A fluid flush resolved the issue.


A dark fluid will not cause brakes to fail in such way than just replacing it it will magically get fixed, more likely you had another problem, unless you had DOT5 fluid and it was very (very) cold outside.
 

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But it's true. When the brakes on my '86 Caravan quit working I found the fluid was black as black coffee. A fluid flush resolved the issue.
The blackness would be due to the rubber particles in the fluid, discoloring it, not from water entering the system, I would think. Then again, how do those particles, from rubber lines down stream, get to the reservoir?

Brake fluid testing:



Google search results re moisture in brake fluid: testing moidture content of brake fluid - Google Search
 

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All we did That's all we did was change the fluid. Black or dark brown brake fluid is contaminated with dirt, rubber, and water which will cause the brakes to become less effective.

I bought the 1986 Caravan used in 2012 and other than making sure it had brake fluid never bothered to check the color because I didn't know to. In June of 2016 (or 2017?) I lost much of my braking ability while driving to the local high school. By now the van was thirty years old and I have no idea if the fluid had every been changed, just added to.

Other than flushing the bad brake fluid I'd had new brakes installed in 2013, and a damaged brake line on the left rear replaced in 2019, that brake line had been rubbing on something under the van and had worn through.
 

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When the brake pedal is soft, there's a leak or air or both.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
So I did it !! A little drama to tell you about. The pedal feels a little more spongey than it did before, but braking action seems to be good. I used a 32 oz big jug of Prestone DOT 3 and 2 little jugs too - just to be sure the fluid got changed. I had my state inspection a few days ago, and the little arrogant **** tech decided to torque up my wheels to I'm guessing in excess of 150lbs. So on removing one of the rear lugs, the nut 19mm nut collapses and gets stuck in the socket. I then realize, that there is a 18mm nut inside, like a Russian doll. It's like an outer Chrome housing that just snapped away. I was fuming, but got a quick fix with a generic replacement from O'Reily's for $2.99.

Was it all worth it? 2 hours as only have basic car jack and ' Philistine ' tools? No, I don't think so. Did save me washing up though !
 

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I always change mine every three years. Digital brake fluid moisture meters are cheap at parts supply stores and work relatively well.
 

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I always change mine every three years. Digital brake fluid moisture meters are cheap at parts supply stores and work relatively well.
Those things are worthless.

Replacing brake fluid that often is just a waste of money.

OK, you buy that thing, then replace brake fluid every three years regardless, money wasted on fluid and money wasted on that thingy.

Then what you do with used brake fluid?
 
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