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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I have a 2000 caravan 3.3 and I have a lot of electrical problems. I have changed the temperature sensor and now it seems to have a problem after the engine is running.key on it goes to the position and as soon I start the engine it drops down to zero.
Now there is a new problem with the charging system, its going well over 15 volt and the control light comes on. I can use all your help with this... thanks.
 

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Charging regulation is controlled by the engine computer. Make sure wiring and connections are undamaged and clean. After that, it may be time for a new ECU unless you want to bypass it and use an external regulator for the alternator charging. If the ECU is responsible for many other electrical faults though, a different ECU would be the better fix.
 

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Hi, I thought about it to to use a external regulator...any idea how that is working and what kind of regulator to use.
 

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It can ONLY be a voltage regulator problem, because the alternator is acting like it's full-fielded and field current is regulated by the PCM. WTH is alternator driver, if it's not just another term for voltage regulator?

This thread is right up imickey's alley. He has posted a lot about alternator stuff in this section. He has posted the parts to do the external regulator before, too.
 

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It can ONLY be a voltage regulator problem, because the alternator is acting like it's full-fielded and field current is regulated by the PCM. WTH is alternator driver, if it's not just another term for voltage regulator?

This thread is right up imickey's alley. He has posted a lot about alternator stuff in this section. He has posted the parts to do the external regulator before, too.
I don't care who posted it first (not imickey for sure).

But, is not a voltage regulator problem, willing to bet on that.

Will not post any more details on why I know that.
 

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Here's a thread I bookmarked with some good info in it. Post #4 shows the external regulator setup.

 

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Here's a thread I bookmarked with some good info in it. Post #4 shows the external regulator setup.


That thread will not helping any, he doesn't have any rectifier problem.

Regarding the external regulator, I posted that info at least one year earlier. He just copied images from the site I posted year earlier and on this thread too. That picture is not his.

To the O.P.

Don't install external regulator (not yet), your regulator is working as it should with the information it receives.

Find a good alternator shop and ask them to test your alternator and wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Could all of this be a problem with the injector wiring harness... anyone has a layout of the wire ring harness..
Someone before I get this car must have done some repairs on the harness... there are not the original wiring...
 

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Thanks to all off you for all the help so far... I have to fix the wires first to see what else is going on...
 

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Typically there are no problems with the injector wiring harness on the 3rd gen. That was an early 4th gen problem (2001-2004). Any wiring that is not stock or looks to have been tampered with is certainly suspect, so it is an excellent place to start. Check and clean the grounds and check connections too.

Levy, I think I figured out what you were saying about it NOT being the regulator. The ECM isn't seeing the true system voltage for whatever reason (that is the actual problem) and is telling the alternator to charge more, when it is already sufficient. So problem is the voltage sensing circuit? Then I chimed in and jumped to the wrong conclusion. My experience with nippondenso alternators is in Toyotas, and they have an internal regulator that usually is the cause of failure (overcharging, or undercharging at idle). That's why my reflex was to condemn the regulator. Sorry, I was eager to help and jumped to the wrong conclusion.
 

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....Levy, I think I figured out what you were saying about it NOT being the regulator. The ECM isn't seeing the true system voltage for whatever reason (that is the actual problem) and is telling the alternator to charge more, when it is already sufficient. So problem is the voltage sensing circuit? Then I chimed in and jumped to the wrong conclusion. My experience with nippondenso alternators is in Toyotas, and they have an internal regulator that usually is the cause of failure (overcharging, or undercharging at idle). That's why my reflex was to condemn the regulator. Sorry, I was eager to help and jumped to the wrong conclusion.

You are on the right track now.

Telling Levy he is wrong? Are you out of your mind? 🤣

And regarding the external voltage regulator, is not about who posted it first (which I did 😅), but it is about help people diagnose and fix their problem.

On my previous reply, I threw a clue for you:

Don't install external regulator (not yet), your regulator is working as it should with the information it receives.

Find a good alternator shop and ask them to test your alternator and wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Don't worry... somehow we get it all taken care of... I will fix the injector wiring harness and the temperature wire first and after that I will look into the alternator wiring...for a wire ring diagram of the harness I would be thankful... thanks to all of you for the great support..
 
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