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I'm on my second set of Nokian tires now and don't see a need to go with a different brand unless something really special jumps out at me at that moment, especially now that they've closed their Russian factory and have the one here in the US up and functioning.
 

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Like gravitylover suggested, I'm tilting toward the Nokian One for my next set on the T&C. It's a 720AA tire on sale for $108.04 at W-M. If they're now made in the USA that's bonus points in my book.

No help if there's not a Wal-Mart tire center nearby...

Most of what's available here in the States is what was made at the Russian factory, the US one is up a d running now but not much has made it into the market yet. Take a look at the Encompass too, it's a newer design and updated compound, the One was an makeup model for big box stores.
 

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No other tire company matches Michelin for quality control, low rolling resistance, long life, and lowest total cost of ownership. Yes, they aren't the lowest priced tire, but they are the lowest cost.
I respectfully disagree. I've had a few sets of Michelins over the last 20 years and didn't appreciate any of them.

I'd love to know the secret to getting mileage out of a set of tires. I am on set number 7 with just under 90k miles on my 2015 T&C. I've had Goodyear, Uniroyal, and Michelin and have not had one go beyond 15k. Alignment is perfect and wear even just always quickly.
Pay close attention to pressures is important but I think the most important is that the tires have the proper load rating for the vehicle. Most people and tire shops shoot for the best price in the right size but ignore the load. These vans aren't heavy but they're also not light so the 102H (or lower) tires that I frequently see on them shouldn't be expected to get much more than 20-25k. Sidewall integrity is critical when you have a top heavy vehicle like these especially if you do a lot of urban and suburban driving where you're cornering and braking a lot.

It's not about the brand, everyone makes something appropriate. Many of the new LRR tires will run 40k easily if the basic requirements are met.
 

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Keep pressure set at 37, even across the tread wear. I do have 102H rating now, but there isn't much higher available in the 225/65R17 OEM size. Even Tire Rack doesn't have more than 2 or 3 higher, and they definitely are made for trucks.
Look for 235/65/17 and you'll find more options. Check out brands Tire Rack doesn't carry like Nokian. I think the new Toyo Celsius also comes in a 104 or 106. I got the most recent set through Tire Agent on a great deal through Capital One Shopping, Priority Tire comes up with some good deals sometimes too.
 

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Michelin does offer a range of tires so I would be interested in which you had. We are not talking about Pilot Sports or the special fuel economy tire when we talk generalizations of their tires. I sure hope you were not buying the Michelin line-up from Walmart.
I had them on 3 different cars as the OE tires. All three rode well enough and the tires seemed to wear reasonably well but the sidewalls were mush and the handling suffered because of it. I really don't like it when I can feel a tire roll over in hard cornering and I can see scrub marks an inch up from the tread. Maybe I'm weird but ride quality, treadwear and mpg are not as important as confidence in emergency maneuvering and the "giggle factor" of a car being laid into a corner and feeling like it's on rails. In the case of a top heavy minivan or suv a properly firm sidewall is even more important.

As to that Toyo Celsius pictured above, there's a reason I keep mentioning it. I've done the feel test on unmounted ones and done all the research to convince me that I want a set but for my most recent purchase I wanted something tougher rather than road oriented so I went with the Nokian Outpost APT. I may well get the Celsius for my wife's Volvo XC60 next week because that car never sees dirt or heavy loads and doesn't do 35k miles a year.
 

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The all weather category came about a few years ago as new rubber/silica compounds were able to be utilized more effectively. Better test data also led to new tread patterns so that these new compounds could work better in cold, wet, snowy and icy conditions. If I remember right, Nokian led the way and Dunlop followed right behind. Most winter specific tread patterns aren't very good in the rain and snow patterns aren't as good on ice as many people think but if you look at the newest stuff there are several different patterns all in one so the tire can perform reasonably well in a variety of conditions.
 

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It's also the rubber compound and the amount of siping. Properly executed sipes give a tire more biting edges for better grip on ice and wet snow. If tread blocks are too open it throws all the snow which is NOT good. You want snow to pack into the linear grooves be cause there is more friction with snow on snow than air on snow, lateral grooves need to clear to expose the biting edges.
 
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