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Well not really because the gasket was bad but because somewhere along the line the oil pan got dented in a little. Not sure how? Maybe something hit it or someone used it as a jacking point? Sorry no pics this time.

Anyway, I’m quite certain the pan has never been off before and overall I was pleased at how everything looked. Other than some varnish here and there from whatever cheap bulk oil was used in the past, it was fairly clean and no concerning debris in the bottom of the pan.

This was really my first time into this particular family of Mopar 90 degree V6s and I’m evermore impressed with the layout. This baby is a deep skirted block, which I didn’t know until now. For a moment, I thought I was working on my 383 Road Runner engine but only with two cylinders lopped off. Nice work Mopar!

On the other hand, one thing that frightened me a bit is I checked the deflection of the timing chain. To me, it felt loose, perhaps around ½” inch or thereabouts. But according to the Chilton manual we’re good to go up to one inch which seems like a ton of slop to me :Wow1:

Also during this project, I discovered that the timing cover gasket was sticking up past pan mounting surface on the block. So I took a fine file and filed it down to match the oil pan matting surface on the black. Not a big deal, but maybe it will make some difference to the gasket seal?

For this project I used a Genuine Mopar OEM oil pan gasket P/N 5241062-AB that I bought online from Pollard Dodge. I also put a few dabs of Permatex Ultra Black at the timing cover and rear seal retainer seams just as the factory did. Also, I barrowed an inch-pounds torque wrench from Auto Zone and torqued the pan down in three steps to the specified final spec of 105 inch-pounds.

So hopefully this will last us for another 100k miles so long as the oil pan stays intact.
 

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Sounds like you did a good job. :thumb:
 

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Well not really because the gasket was bad but because somewhere along the line the oil pan got dented in a little. Not sure how? Maybe something hit it or someone used it as a jacking point? Sorry no pics this time.

Anyway, I’m quite certain the pan has never been off before and overall I was pleased at how everything looked. Other than some varnish here and there from whatever cheap bulk oil was used in the past, it was fairly clean and no concerning debris in the bottom of the pan.

This was really my first time into this particular family of Mopar 90 degree V6s and I’m evermore impressed with the layout. This baby is a deep skirted block, which I didn’t know until now. For a moment, I thought I was working on my 383 Road Runner engine but only with two cylinders lopped off. Nice work Mopar!

On the other hand, one thing that frightened me a bit is I checked the deflection of the timing chain. To me, it felt loose, perhaps around ½” inch or thereabouts. But according to the Chilton manual we’re good to go up to one inch which seems like a ton of slop to me :Wow1:

Also during this project, I discovered that the timing cover gasket was sticking up past pan mounting surface on the block. So I took a fine file and filed it down to match the oil pan matting surface on the black. Not a big deal, but maybe it will make some difference to the gasket seal?

For this project I used a Genuine Mopar OEM oil pan gasket P/N 5241062-AB that I bought online from Pollard Dodge. I also put a few dabs of Permatex Ultra Black at the timing cover and rear seal retainer seams just as the factory did. Also, I barrowed an inch-pounds torque wrench from Auto Zone and torqued the pan down in three steps to the specified final spec of 105 inch-pounds.

So hopefully this will last us for another 100k miles so long as the oil pan stays intact.
Sounds like it went well. There are WAY too many people who can't seem to get a grip on where the silicone sealer is supposed to go when you’re installing the oil pan gasket. You did it like you’re a pro!
The timing cover gasket trimming you spoke of is common needed, good call to make it flush like it should have been done at the assembly plant.
When I had my timing cover off at 300K to reseal it, I too had that same slop in the chain. Well within specs but I replaced the timing set while I was in there for good measure.
I didn't have any of that varnish in mine thanks to syn oil since oil change #1.
View attachment 7298
 
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