The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just changed the tranny fluid/filter on my 03 T&C. Dealer parts guy said it takes 4 or 5 qts. Haynes book said 4 qts. Have about 4.5 qts in and worked it through all the gears with engine running as book recommends, checking it in park or N. Tough to read dipstick. I think I am still low because only the bottom end is completely coated with fluid. But higher up the stick there are smears of fluid and dry spots, I am guessing from rubbing the tube on the way in/out, which make the reading confusing. For grins I checked with engine off and cold and it is fully coated all the way up in the hot region. So 2 questions... any secrets for reading it with engine running to know between smears of fluid from the dipstick pipe vs actual level. And as a double check, roughly where should I see the level on the dipstick when the engine is off and cold? Thanks!!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,109 Posts
You can't check it with the engine off and cold, it HAS to be running and at least warm. The transmission I mean has to be warm, not the engine, as the trans takes much longer to get up to temperature.

You use the line where the solid coating on the dipstick stops. The smears and drips above it mean nothing.
 

·
1000 Post Club Member
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
My advice would be to fill it only to the bottom of the fill hatching when cold, then run it to get it good and hot! then measure it and fill to the full line. I can't tell you how many times mechanics have filled these things full cold and then they end up overfilled when hot. If you put too much in, don't freak. Just go to Lowe's and buy some 3/8" clear tubing and run down the dipstick tube and suck out by siphoning what is over. You can put it in a clean and dry water bottle (clear) and you will know exactly how much you are getting out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
25,147 Posts
You can drive your vehicle for an hour in below freezing temperatures and the transmission fluid tempertaure won't get up to Chrysler's definition for hot (can't comfortably touch/hold the fluid with your fingers). It feels no warmer than luke warm water.
After 5 to 10 minutes of driving in the cold, it will be warm enough for the torque convertor to lock up. On mine, for example, 2000 rpm should correspond to 100 kmph. When cold, it corresponds to 80 kmph for over 6 minutes.
Probably best to check the transmission when cold and use the cold readings on the dip stick. There's quite a gap on the dip stick between the cold and hot readings. What does that correspond to in volume, I wonder.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,109 Posts
I would say around half a quart at the most.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Folks!

Thanks everyone for your advice. Got it up to luke warm feeling and filled it to mid-cold range and will recheck it after a good long drive and once the cold weather breaks here.

Chris
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top