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whatever company made the replacement parts they rebuilt it with might call for a specific fluid

i also think that if the transmission starts its life using a fluid it should keep that type of fluid, it's why it's so important to not use anything but ATF+4 in these original transmissions

it would be just as important to me to only use the type of fluid that came with my remanufactured transmission, consistency is key to prevent damage


Yes, but how much testing did these parts guys do on shear, friction and longevity? Likely none so they depend on the oil companies to do a selling job on them. For universal transmission fluid there are many, many choices and then there's Amsoil, that likely (maybe) has (had) a superior base oil.

I doubt that they tag instructions on the dipstick tube, as to the fluid to use.

I think we should we should consult LEVY on this controversial topic. :)
 
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Ha. Jeepman mentioned German engineering.
My definition... Why use just 2 parts to do a job perfectly well, when you can use 12 will do the job almost as well.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #25
With the 2021 Grand Caravan/ Voyager, forget about ATF+4 for the 9 speed transmission.

Under normal operating conditions, the fluid installed at the factory will provide satisfactory lubrication for the life of the vehicle. Routine fluid and filter changes are not required. However, change the fluid and filter if the fluid becomes contaminated (with water, etc.), or if the transmission is disassembled for any reason.
Bet the factory have been reading my posts regarding never change ATF. 🤣
On page 427 of my PDF owner’s manual (2006 Caravan Grand Caravan) it clearly states that under normal operating conditions no transmission fluid change is necessary.
See Image below
59097

On page 451 of the manual under SCHEDULE B it clearly states that you only need to change the transmission fluid only if you use the van as taxi, police or delivery or trailer towing. See the little symbol
59098

On page 455 under SCHEDULE B once again the manual states that changing the fluid is only recommended if you use the van as taxi, police or delivery or trailer towing. As marked by the little symbol.

59101


Furthermore I understand that LEVY does a lot of towing and never changes his trans fluid and his transmissions outlast the transmissions of people who carelessly change their fluid unnecessarily, contaminate and or change the chemical compounds and ruin the gearbox. I believe LEVY and I believe all the post here from people that did unnecessarily change their fluids and ruin the tranny by contamination and or by changing the chemical compounds.
 
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Yes, the 4th Generations didn't specify a fluid/filter change during normal service. However, the 5th Generations do have a fluid/filter change interval for normal service.
 

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On page 427 of my PDF owner’s manual (2006 Caravan Grand Caravan) it clearly states that under normal operating conditions no transmission fluid change is necessary.
See Image below
View attachment 59097
On page 451 of the manual under SCHEDULE B it clearly states that you only need to change the transmission fluid only if you use the van as taxi, police or delivery or trailer towing. See the little symbol
View attachment 59098
On page 455 under SCHEDULE B once again the manual states that changing the fluid is only recommended if you use the van as taxi, police or delivery or trailer towing. As marked by the little symbol.

View attachment 59101

Furthermore I understand that LEVY does a lot of towing and never changes his trans fluid and his transmissions outlast the transmissions of people who carelessly change their fluid unnecessarily, contaminate and or change the chemical compounds and ruin the gearbox. I believe LEVY and I believe all the post here from people that did unnecessarily change their fluids and ruin the tranny by contamination and or by changing the chemical compounds.
if you use the van as taxi, police or delivery or trailer towing. <~ ~ ~ Or drive like that regularly...

aarongriffin, judging by your gunked up transmission cooler before replacement, I imagine you have already had a fluid change, likely three times over.
 

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Well, almost... When the leak got worse (i.e. just before cooler replacement) I think I went through about 3-4 bottles of fluid (yes, certified fluid, don't worry y'all). :D

Other than that to the topic, I'll just repeat myself:

...when a manufacturer recommends some interval how often something should be changed, the interval does not mean "Change it this often so everything lasts as long as it can", it's more like "If you change it this often, the car will last long enough that you won't get mad at Chrysler and might buy again" (I guess another translation of that would be "You won't never need to shell out monies for transmission fluid change because it's there for lifetime! yay" which the kind of math regular car buyers like to do.)
...
Of course, anyone can do what they believe is best, which for me is periodical change of all fluids (sometimes at interval shorter that what the manufacturer recommends).
 

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How about chopped up snakes? :)
I am leaning more towards a plant based diet these days (so en vogue) that I would consider a fists of asparagus over snakes...
 

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I am leaning more towards a plant based diet these days (so en vogue) that I would consider a fists of asparagus over snakes...
Asparagus oil over "snake oil"? You are thinking outside the gearbox. :)
 

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1996 Caravan 2.4L 3 speed - I have an in-line trans filter with a capacity of about a quart. From time to time I change it out and have been refilling with this Amsoil product.
I am noticing a bit of a clunkier feel when shifting into Reverse. And from Neutral to Forward or Reverse. Nothing that I'm worried about but I'll switch back to refilling with ATF-4.
 

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Bet the factory have been reading my posts regarding never change ATF. 🤣
The definition of "Life" is the lawyers operative word- considering that FCA/Chrysler is making money selling new vehicles- So how long of a "life" do you suppose they plan for each transmission using original fluids?
If regular fluid changes, increased the life of a tranny , I can see a perverse reason (new car sales) why they wouldn't want people to do that.
Has anyone ever wondered, if transmissions fail sooner up north, than in a warm climate? I had never pondered what happens to a tranny when condensation in the fluid freezes--
 

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The definition of "Life" is the lawyers operative word- considering that FCA/Chrysler is making money selling new vehicles- So how long of a "life" do you suppose they plan for each transmission using original fluids?
If regular fluid changes, increased the life of a tranny , I can see a perverse reason (new car sales) why they wouldn't want people to do that.
Has anyone ever wondered, if transmissions fail sooner up north, than in a warm climate? I had never pondered what happens to a tranny when condensation in the fluid freezes--
As far as lubrication goes, the base oils are good for life, the additive package, maybe not so much. Manual transmissions, differentials, don't normally require a fluid change. The manual transmission on my Jeep has lifetime fluid but I noticed a difference in shifting when I did the one and only fluid change to date. Water getting into the differentials, through condensation or whatever, can be a concern, so changing that is not a bad thing. The automatic transmissions are pretty much closed in except for venting, plus they have a filter, so lifetime could be 15 years, maybe more. The frictional components in the additive package, are the wear factor.
 

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When people talk about older cars they remember through rose-colored glasses, they tend to forget a few facts.

1. Modern vehicles typically have twice the horsepower of "old" cars, if not more.
2. "Old" transmissions like the Powerglide, Turbo 350 or 400, or Torqueflite 727 tended to be much simpler and often overbuilt to fit a whole range of vehicles from small to large.
3. "Old" cars simply didn't get driven nearly as much, or as fast, or with the heavier loads common now. Typical cars in the 50's were scrapped long before 100k. Typical cars in the 60's-70's era were scrapped long before 200k. I can state this from extensive audits of scrapyards I conducted in the past. It's easy to make the claim "old" cars lasted longer when they were used half as much, and much more gently. Back in the day it was rare for me to drive much more than 60mph, even on long trips, these days people are flashing their lights behind you when you're doing 80.
 

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The definition of "Life" is the lawyers operative word- considering that FCA/Chrysler is making money selling new vehicles- So how long of a "life" do you suppose they plan for each transmission using original fluids?
If regular fluid changes, increased the life of a tranny , I can see a perverse reason (new car sales) why they wouldn't want people to do that.
Has anyone ever wondered, if transmissions fail sooner up north, than in a warm climate? I had never pondered what happens to a tranny when condensation in the fluid freezes--
I live in the "north", and I've never had a transmission fail due to "condensation". Never heard of such a thing. I have never found water in a transmission. Transmissions can be sluggish when very cold, but that's why we warm cars up before driving them.
 

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The definition of "Life" is the lawyers operative word- considering that FCA/Chrysler is making money selling new vehicles- So how long of a "life" do you suppose they plan for each transmission using original fluids?
If regular fluid changes, increased the life of a tranny , I can see a perverse reason (new car sales) why they wouldn't want people to do that.
Has anyone ever wondered, if transmissions fail sooner up north, than in a warm climate? I had never pondered what happens to a tranny when condensation in the fluid freezes--
Chrysler makes a lot of money selling ATF+4 fluid, regardless who make that fluid. Much more than fixing failed transmissions, so it would be a better deal to ask vehicle owners to change ATF often. It had to be another reason for Chrysler recommend not to change ATF.

Very few changes vehicle just for a failed transmission.

And, I never heard of condensation either.

From the link you posted:

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The Effect of Cold Weather on Your Transmission

Water: Water in the transmission is never a good thing. Actually, it’s terrible and can cause a massive repair bill. If water is in it when cold, it will freeze at 32 degrees Fahrenheit. When it freezes, it expands, and that can cause damage to the case and valve body in the transmission by creating cracks. If those cracks appear, the transmission cannot be rebuilt.

This issue tends to be a major problem on certain Nissan vehicles holding an RE5 transmission. The transmission itself runs well. However, radiator fluid can find its way into the transmission, causing substantial damaged to a vehicle that often requires rebuilding the transmission with a new valve body, changing out the radiator and reprogramming the transmission control module.

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If engine coolant mix with ATF, it should not freeze because you should have antifreeze in your cooling system, not plain water.

Find a better source for your claims.
 
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