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I just purchased a 2012 Chrysler Town and Country Touring - L and it's in very good condition. It appears to have had rust proofing done previously. I would like to have it rust proofed but there are so many different kinds available, Krown, Corrosion Free, Fluid Film. Rust Check, etc. etc.

Just wondering what you use and why you prefer the one you use?

Advice would be appreciated.
 

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Krown. It will drip oil for weeks after you have it sprayed. Takes a year before your driveway will come back to normal. They you get it sprayed again.
 

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Agree on Krown. Park the van in the neighbour's driveway for a few days after....:cool:
 
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Oilgard if in Ontario,the best around.
Krown never got into the nooks and crannies on my last visit .
Oil gard take of rear lights and gets in behind panels etc.
I got a half and half.
Meaning thinner oil in behind the panelling and thicker oil underneath.
Not to sure if they are in Toronto
I’m in Windsor Ontario 👍
 

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An address south of the Mason-Dixon. :ROFLMAO:

Jeepman swears by Fluid Film, but also says he does Krown. If I lived in the great rusty north, I'd probably have a drive in pool filled with used motor oil. Sure the exhaust would smoke like helI and the brakes would need cleaning, but it sure beats having to scrap a 5 year old car.
 

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Nothing aftermarket; just get an underbody wash frequently in the winter. My last two vehicles had 20+ yrs. in US Northern Great Plains winters, and bodies were still in good shape.

M
211006
 

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I just purchased a 2012 Chrysler Town and Country Touring - L and it's in very good condition. It appears to have had rust proofing done previously. I would like to have it rust proofed but there are so many different kinds available, Krown, Corrosion Free, Fluid Film. Rust Check, etc. etc.

Just wondering what you use and why you prefer the one you use?

Advice would be appreciated.
Rust Block is another one. All the products mentioned are good, although I prefer Fluid Film, when doing my own corrosion protection. The installation is the critical part. There's a local medium size auto repair shop here that does Krown and the person doing it has been at it for decades. He also trains others using the Krown process. When not doing that, he works as a Mechanic in the shop. Contrast that with some temporary worker that does the application. Who do you think does the better job?

Krown seems to be the more reliable for application, considering their training program and their 250 locations in Canada, the USA and Europe.

There's no well established shop locally using Fluid Film for me to consider. Nearest shop that I know of is about an hour away.

Corrosion Free is a good product but would one trust a Canadian Tire employee to do a top notch job?

Familiarize yourself with the process which includes inside door, rocker and other body panels. Besides protecting the hidden areas, it lubricates locks, protects electrical connections, etc. My engine bays are covered with corrosion protection. No electrical problems or dried out hoses here.

A good product stays soft, does not harden/harbor corrosion, repels moisture, penetrates, and creeps with time.

Here's a tutorial using the Fluid Film product.

If your vehicle has received corrosion protection, try to find out what was used and when. There should be rubber plugs in various areas to cover the holes drilled to apply the product. Check the top of the rocker panels and the lock striker area for the front doors.
 
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if I could get Fluid Film sprayed I would, but that's not available in Toronto so I go with Krown as the next best thing. Have used Krown on every car I've owned for years.
 

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A good product stays soft, does not harden/harbor corrosion, repels moisture, penetrates, and creeps with time.

Here's a tutorial using the Fluid Film product.

If your vehicle has received corrosion protection, try to find out what was used and when. There should be rubber plugs in various areas to cover the holes drilled to apply the product. Check the top of the rocker panels and the lock striker area for the front doors.
Delorean learned that the hard way.

Delorean coated their frames with some kind of epoxi (hard) product, thinking it would last forever.

Most Delorean frames by now look like this one:

Wood Natural material Trunk Automotive tire Driftwood
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Rust Block is another one. All the products mentioned are good, although I prefer Fluid Film, when doing my own corrosion protection. The installation is the critical part. There's a local medium size auto repair shop here that does Krown and the person doing it has been at it for decades. He also trains others using the Krown process. When not doing that, he works as a Mechanic in the shop. Contrast that with some temporary worker that does the application. Who do you think does the better job?

Krown seems to be the more reliable for application, considering their training program and their 250 locations in Canada, the USA and Europe.

There's no well established shop locally using Fluid Film for me to consider. Nearest shop that I know of is about an hour away.

Corrosion Free is a good product but would one trust a Canadian Tire employee to do a top notch job?

Familiarize yourself with the process which includes inside door, rocker and other body panels. Besides protecting the hidden areas, it lubricates locks, protects electrical connections, etc. My engine bays are covered with corrosion protection. No electrical problems or dried out hoses here.

A good product stays soft, does not harden/harbor corrosion, repels moisture, penetrates, and creeps with time.

Here's a tutorial using the Fluid Film product.

If your vehicle has received corrosion protection, try to find out what was used and when. There should be rubber plugs in various areas to cover the holes drilled to apply the product. Check the top of the rocker panels and the lock striker area for the front doors.
I am in Kitchener and Bustards Chrysler Jeep Ram dealership offers Corrosion Free. I agree with not having Canadian Tire do it, but do you think it would be safe to have Bustard's do it?

I have no way of finding out what rust proofing had been done in the past. The used car lot I am dealing with bought it from a Mazda dealership as a trade in and he had no info about the rust proofing. However the salesman use to own a Rust Check in Guelph and he said he figured the vehicle had been rust proofed with one of those lifetime type rust proofing.

I did find a place in Stratford that does Fluid Film. So of the two which would you recommend? Fluid Film or Corrosion Free.
 

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I am in Kitchener and Bustards Chrysler Jeep Ram dealership offers Corrosion Free. I agree with not having Canadian Tire do it, but do you think it would be safe to have Bustard's do it?

I have no way of finding out what rust proofing had been done in the past. The used car lot I am dealing with bought it from a Mazda dealership as a trade in and he had no info about the rust proofing. However the salesman use to own a Rust Check in Guelph and he said he figured the vehicle had been rust proofed with one of those lifetime type rust proofing.

I did find a place in Stratford that does Fluid Film. So of the two which would you recommend? Fluid Film or Corrosion Free.
Go for the Fluid Film but ask a few questions to get a feel for the quality of application. How long have they been doing Fluid Film? Do they do inside door, rocker and other panels? The experience of their applicator(s)? Are they an "authorized" Fluid Film applicator? Any warranty? Cost?

A Dealership applying Corrosion Free? Interesting, Dealerships usually half apply some supposed "lifetime" product at a high price and then have a third party warranty that gives the Customer the run around. Stay away from that expensive experience. Check them out though, as above, they may be legit.

Cost for Krown here, for the Van, is stated at $139.95 plus tax. They sometimes have $15.00 off specials, which aren't that hard to get. CAA discounts may apply as well.

FLUID FILM UNDERCOATING LOCATOR

CORROSION FREE - FIND YOUR LOCAL DEALER

KROWN LOCATIONS

Good Luck.
 

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Dealers do not do it in house. The sub it out to a specialty shop and mark up the price 25-40%.

If you are going to get it done, don't get it at a dealer.
 

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I have no way of finding out what rust proofing had been done in the past. The used car lot I am dealing with bought it from a Mazda dealership as a trade in and he had no info about the rust proofing. However the salesman use to own a Rust Check in Guelph and he said he figured the vehicle had been rust proofed with one of those lifetime type rust proofing.
Just look for the plastic plugs in the door s and door sills which cover holes drilled for application. If there are no plugs, at most it might have undercoating.
 

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Nothing aftermarket; just get an underbody wash frequently in the winter. My last two vehicles had 20+ yrs. in US Northern Great Plains winters, and bodies were still in good shape.

M
211006
Gets washed with every rain storm here, doesn't help much with the road salt. Doesn't washing just give the salt a fresh wet surface to work on the next outing? Dry is better. Those Gatlin guns, used in car washes, likely clean off the corrosion protection as well.
What about inside your door and hatch panels, rocker panels, and quarter panels? No salt gets in there? The underside of a vehicle is the lesser concern for corrosion protection.
 
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I read somewhere that washing your car in the winter is not good.better left alone till snow goes away lol.
Holy cow that vehicle would be in a right mess.
Jeepman I’ve got a couple of cans of fluid film.I guess it’ll do no harm if I give it a few blasts in the spring on top of the oilgard product? .
Just got it oiled last week 👍
 

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I read somewhere that washing your car in the winter is not good.better left alone till snow goes away lol.
Holy cow that vehicle would be in a right mess.
Jeepman I’ve got a couple of cans of fluid film.I guess it’ll do no harm if I give it a few blasts in the spring on top of the oilgard product? .
Just got it oiled last week 👍
If the vehicle was on a hoist, a thorough wash underneath is possible, but otherwise, pretty much hit and miss, likely more "miss" than "hit". It may make one feel better, but that's about the extent of it. Corrosion protection is a layer of protection from the salt and, if applied properly, will cover all the bases. You don't want to wash that off by over washing.

The recommendations about washing regularly during the winter don't seem to include corrosion protection in the discussion. I wish they did. Washing in the splash zone won't hurt though, but dry cold isn't bad either. Where's the science? :)

Applying your Fluid Film will be okay. I just applied Fluid Film over Krown in my rocker panels (through two drain holes per side), along the the outside of my rocker panels and across the backend yesterday, using an 8 gallon compressor and a spray wand. I Fluid Filmed my Jeep as well, the temperature was above 20C, sprayer worked great.

You can get a wand for your spray cans but it dumps product fast, so be fast. The wands will work on Rust Check cans as well.



There's another product called Woolwax which is similar to Fluid Film, but thicker, so they say. It's fairly new and I haven't heard much about it or seen it advertised locally. It's suppose to be less expensive, Fluid Film, in Canada, is way overpriced, Canadian Distributor is reportedly a pain. :)
 

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As someone who lives in the rust belt and daily drives a 300k mile 1994 van year round, the classic wash/good sealer before winter, followed by weekly washing (talking pull into the manual bay so you can spray underneath and blast everything out) to keep the salt off does perfectly fine.

That was my process on both my 90s vans and it's my process with my 2018. I figure if it worked to keep my 92 looking this good 29 years later despite being a daily driver in the rust belt, I must be doing something right:
Automotive parking light Car Wheel Tire Land vehicle
 

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What are you doing for inside door panels, quarter panels, rocker panels and rear hatch? What about up front cross members? How do you wash in those places? No salt getting in there?
Drier, colder air maybe?
The under body is not the major concern for rusting here. It's the inside hidden areas that are most concerning and no washing from outside is going to help that. Corrosion proofing will.

An old Corrosivity Map of North America
 
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